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Nikolay Myaskovsky A Composer and His Times


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M. Yaskovsky
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« on: August 23, 2021, 01:52:12 pm »

New book by Patrick Zuk on Nikolay Myaskovsky available at https://boydellandbrewer.com/9781783275755/nikolay-myaskovsky/

Zuk's account depicts the composer and his milieu against the backdrop of his turbulenttimes, examining his involvement with Soviet musical institutions and his relationships with Prokofiev, Shostakovich, and other notable musicians. The portrait is far removed from Cold War clichés of the regimented Soviet artist or sentimental stereotypes of persecuted genius. Myaskovsky emerges as a man who displayed remarkable courage and integrity in the face of many pressures. The book also brings into focus the distinctive nature of Myaskovsky's creative achievement and affirms his stature as a leading symphonist of the era.
 
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dhibbard
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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2021, 05:31:33 pm »

I think that David Hollingsworth would be interested in this book.   He is a member of this forum.
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2021, 10:10:18 pm »

I wish I knew where to start with Myaskovsky. I have versions of the Cello Concerto by both Mstislav Rostropovich and Truls Mørk, although I really love the Violin Concerto too and have a Melodiya LP of it with Grigori Feigin and Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra conducted by Alexander Dmitriev. However, where to start with all those symphonies? And thirteen string quartets, is it? Maybe I'm too old and should give up on the idea but I've always loved Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Glazunov and hordes of otther Russian composers of the romantic era and so I'm sure I'm missing out by not investigating Myaskovsky's symphonies. Any suggestions as to which ines to start with, folks?
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christopher
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« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2021, 12:43:58 pm »

Without question number 21 - above and beyond the most atmospheric of all of them.  Chills down the spine.

I love the Gould - and the Ormandy -
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2021, 12:48:16 pm »

Without question number 21 - above and beyond the most atmospheric of all of them.  Chills down the spine.


Thank you very much, Christopher. I shall take up that suggestion. Smiley
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M. Yaskovsky
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« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2021, 02:07:50 pm »

The 21st is an excellent introduction. You could consider the 6th, which is, with or without choral end, a stunner. Take Jarvi with the Gothenburg forces. The 27th needs attention too. The 17th is worth your time: composed at the height of the Great Terror, its idiom seems a little more extroverted than usual, Rachmaninov crossed with Khachaturian perhaps. The epic slow movement will be a must for listeners with a sweet tooth! No 22, called a 'symphonic ballad' is my favourite. Try Svetlanov's readings.
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2021, 02:13:36 pm »

The 21st is an excellent introduction. You could consider the 6th, which is, with or without choral end, a stunner. Take Jarvi with the Gothenburg forces. The 27th needs attention too. The 17th is worth your time: composed at the height of the Great Terror, its idiom seems a little more extroverted than usual, Rachmaninov crossed with Khachaturian perhaps. The epic slow movement will be a must for listeners with a sweet tooth! No 22, called a 'symphonic ballad' is my favourite. Try Svetlanov's readings.

Thank you kindly. That seems like enough to get me started. I do have a sweet tooth!
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Jeff
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« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2021, 11:51:07 pm »

No 6 is my choice too.
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2021, 07:59:10 am »

No 6 is my choice too.

Thank you, Jeff. That'll be next, then!
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rkhenderson
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« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2021, 12:46:01 pm »

I'd also recommend these two very beautiful movements arranged for strings from Myaskovsky symphony no. 19 (originally for wind):

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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2021, 01:44:38 pm »

I'd also recommend these two very beautiful movements arranged for strings from Myaskovsky symphony no. 19 (originally for wind):



Thank you for taking the trouble to point me in the right direction!
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Jeff
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« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2021, 07:00:58 am »

The cello sonatas are lovely too,very wistful.
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2021, 10:34:09 am »

The cello sonatas are lovely too,very wistful.

Agreed; as well as recordings of Rostropovich playing the second with Alexander Dedyukhin, I have Pavel Gomziakov (cello) and Andrei Korobeinikov (piano) playing both of them.
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