The Art-Music Forum
September 17, 2021, 03:10:11 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: A place to discover and discuss a wide range of composers and music (both familiar and forgotten), recordings, broadcasts, books and art. Register, contribute and explore!
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

Your favourite ballet scores


Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Your favourite ballet scores  (Read 256 times)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« on: May 13, 2021, 08:54:02 pm »

For me it's a three-way tie between Delibes' Sylvia (1876), Tchaikovsky's Sleeping Beauty (1889, perf. 1890) and Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet (1935-38, rev. 1940). The first for its elegance and élan, the second for its symphonic technique, glittering orchestration and thrilling moments (e.g. the re-awakening of the court at the end of Act II) all set within the tight rigors of Petipa's precise choreographic demands, and the third simply because it is the most moving ballet that I've ever heard or seen.

I also adore the ballets of Glazunov, Khachaturian and Arthur Bliss, but the three above never fail to make me think "ain't ballet great?"

 Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

dhibbard
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 66
Offline Offline

Posts: 2364



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2021, 10:11:49 pm »

Tchaikovsky's Sleeping Beauty   is the one!!
« Last Edit: May 14, 2021, 09:37:12 am by Admin » Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2021, 10:27:37 pm »

Tchaikovsky's Sleeping Beauty   is the one!!

Yay!

From the original 1890 production -



My favourite recording is the Lanchbery/ Philharmonia (originally 3 LPs)



which was stupidly truncated by EMI for CD release (to squeeze it onto 2 CDs) but thankfully released in the US complete by Musical Heritage Society (532624Y). Seek it out! Although it took several years for me to get a copy from ebay...

 Roll Eyes
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1300


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2021, 10:54:38 pm »

I stand by to be pelted with rotten fruit by all balletomanes but dance in any form doesn't really float my boat. Of course, there's a lot of music from ballets that I like (Tchaikovsky, of course) but I couldn't say that I have a favourite score. Khachaturian wrote some lovely stuff (the Lullaby from Gayane, for example, is exquisite). But entire scores? Nah.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2021, 09:36:38 am by Admin » Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2021, 05:17:40 am »

I stand by to be pelted with rotten fruit by all balletomanes but dance in any form doesn't really float my boat.

How can you possibly resist the grace, refinement and delicacy of the terpsichorean arts? After all, "Lady Frederica" herself, no less, took to the (reinforced) stage of the Hove Tivoli...



...sadly, her syllabub-addiction was then at its zenith. Her death is recorded at the Brighton and Hove Registry Office as having been due to pneumonoultramicroscopicsilic ovolcanoconiosis.

 Shocked
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1300


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2021, 08:23:29 am »

I stand by to be pelted with rotten fruit by all balletomanes but dance in any form doesn't really float my boat.

How can you possibly resist the grace, refinement and delicacy of the terpsichorean arts? After all, "Lady Frederica" herself, no less, took to the (reinforced) stage of the Hove Tivoli...

...sadly, her syllabub-addiction was then at its zenith. Her death is recorded at the Brighton and Hove Registry Office as having been due to pneumonoultramicroscopicsilic ovolcanoconiosis.

 Shocked

As Florence was wont to say to Dougal in The Magic Roundabout, "Oh you!"

« Last Edit: May 14, 2021, 09:36:01 am by Admin » Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2021, 08:45:25 am »

As Florence was wont to say to Dougal in The Magic Roundabout, "Oh you!"

Florrie really hammered the LSD in the 60s...



..."magic bean"? Hmmm....

 Wink
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2021, 09:17:36 am »

Oh, did I forget to mention Sullivan's Victoria and Merrie England (1897)?

 Wink

Not strictly a ballet per se, but I'd also put in good words for Holst's ballet-music from The Perfect Fool and several other operatic extractions (Verdi, Ponchielli, Gounod, Saint-Saens, Massenet, etc.)...

 Cool
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1300


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2021, 09:36:15 am »

Oh, did I forget to mention Sullivan's Victoria and Merrie England (1897)?


And may I be so bold as to add Sullivan's L'Île Enchantée (1864), written as a divertissement at the end of Bellini's La Sonnambula at Covent Garden?
Report Spam   Logged
Admin
Administrator
Level 3
*****

Times thanked: 51
Offline Offline

Posts: 159


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2021, 09:38:16 am »

Note the change of title - there are just too many to whittle down to a single example!

 Smiley
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2021, 09:41:30 am »

Oh, did I forget to mention Sullivan's Victoria and Merrie England (1897)?


And may I be so bold as to add Sullivan's L'Île Enchantée (1864), written as a divertissement at the end of Bellini's La Sonnambula at Covent Garden?

You certainly may, Sir! It's due to be recorded by John Andrews for Dutton pretty soon (with three extra previously un-discovered sections), together with The Procession March (1863) and a new re-orchestration of the overture to The Sapphire Necklace (1863-64).

 Grin
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1300


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2021, 09:54:52 am »


...together with The Procession March (1863)...
 Grin

The Procession March? Where on earth did they find the score of that?
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2021, 10:19:33 am »


...together with The Procession March (1863)...
 Grin

The Procession March? Where on earth did they find the score of that?

Until very recently, only the military band arrangement was known to be extant. However, orchestral parts were recently re-discovered and will be utilised for the recording.

 Smiley

There are the military band arrangements of both The Procession March and The Danish March in the British and Irish Music Archive, written for Dirty Bertie and Alex's nuptials in 1863. The (excellent) recordings are from a long-deleted and now virtually impossible to find CD with The Band of the Royal Military School of Music, Kneller Hall, conducted by Frank Renton (Bandleader BNA5067, 1992).

 Cool
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1300


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2021, 10:43:22 am »


...together with The Procession March (1863)...
 Grin

The Procession March? Where on earth did they find the score of that?

Until very recently, only the military band arrangement was known to be extant. However, orchestral parts were recently re-discovered and will be utilised for the recording.

 Smiley

There are the military band arrangements of both The Procession March and The Danish March in the British and Irish Music Archive, written for Dirty Bertie and Alex's nuptials in 1863. The (excellent) recordings are from a long-deleted and now virtually impossible to find CD with The Band of the Royal Military School of Music, Kneller Hall, conducted by Frank Renton (Bandleader BNA5067, 1992).

 Cool
Thanks. I have a recording of The Danish March on an LP by that same band, but conducted by Lt. Col. George Evans (Bandleader BND1003, 1982, I think). I will now go fertling around in the archive for the band arrangement of The Procession March.  Smiley
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1854


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2021, 10:57:25 am »

I will now go fertling around in the archive for the band arrangement of The Procession March.  Smiley



Mmmmm, sniffed out a bit of Sullivan somewhere...

 Shocked
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum


Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy