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Another birthday!


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Author Topic: Another birthday!  (Read 2917 times)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #210 on: August 12, 2021, 03:18:58 pm »


Nice try, still think the Secretary of State for Transport should be held accountable...

...caught napping, eh?

Some hope!
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #211 on: August 12, 2021, 03:24:56 pm »


Nice try, still think the Secretary of State for Transport should be held accountable...

...caught napping, eh?

Some hope!

I feared as much, let wagons roll (and roll over with alacrity)...

 Cheesy
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #212 on: August 13, 2021, 06:39:00 am »

Christoph Nichelmann (1717), Edwin Grasse (1884), Francisco Escudero (1913), Friedrich Burchard Beneken (1760), Gustav Lange (1830), Hayato Matsuo (1965), Heino Jürisalu (1930), Henri Woollett (1864), John Cacavas (1930), John Ireland (1879), Károly Thern (1817), Koji Kondo (1960); Lee Roy Abernathy (1913), Leonid Nikolayev (1878), Leonid Polovinkin (1894), Oskar Sigmund (1919), Paul Blumenthal (1843), Paul W. Allen (1947), Randal Corsen (1972), Salomon Jadassohn (1831), Sarah Hopkins (1958), Stephen Whittington (1953)

Uh-oh, Friday 13th...



...but who's been luckiest in the recording studios?
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #213 on: August 14, 2021, 06:57:09 am »

Adolfo Abalos (1914), Armas Järnefelt (1869), Bjřrn Kruse (1946), Brant Karrick (1960), Brian Fennelly (1937), Cyro Pereira (1929), Doug Wagner (1952), Edmund Meisel (1894), Gregory Short (1938), Hermann Immerthal (1809), James Horner (1953), Jan Koetsier (1911), Johann Georg Störl (1675), Joseph Pehrson (1950), Kaikhosru Shapurji Sorabji (1892), Karel Miry (1823), László Melis (1953), Leone Sinigaglia (1868), Leopold Hofmann (1738), Louis Moyse (1912), Max Wagenknecht (1857), Pierre Schaeffer (1910), Rodolfo Ledesma (1954), Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810), Terry Adams (1948), William Flanagan (1923)

And the band played on...

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #214 on: August 14, 2021, 09:34:55 am »

Adolfo Abalos (1914), Armas Järnefelt (1869), Bjřrn Kruse (1946), Brant Karrick (1960), Brian Fennelly (1937), Cyro Pereira (1929), Doug Wagner (1952), Edmund Meisel (1894), Gregory Short (1938), Hermann Immerthal (1809), James Horner (1953), Jan Koetsier (1911), Johann Georg Störl (1675), Joseph Pehrson (1950), Kaikhosru Shapurji Sorabji (1892), Karel Miry (1823), László Melis (1953), Leone Sinigaglia (1868), Leopold Hofmann (1738), Louis Moyse (1912), Max Wagenknecht (1857), Pierre Schaeffer (1910), Rodolfo Ledesma (1954), Samuel Sebastian Wesley (1810), Terry Adams (1948), William Flanagan (1923)

And the band played on...



Ah-ha! You set a trap for the unwary: the music for that film about The Titanic, A Night to Remember was composed by the excellent William Alwyn; James Horner did the 1997 film Titanic.
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #215 on: August 14, 2021, 09:42:42 am »

Ah-ha! You set a trap for the unwary: the music for that film about The Titanic, A Night to Remember was composed by the excellent William Alwyn; James Horner did the 1997 film Titanic.

Mmmmm, cheese, lovely cheese...



...which pretty much sums up James Cameron's talking-picture.

 Wink

Near, far, wherever you are
I believe that the heart does go on.
Once more you open the door
And you're here in my heart
And my heart will go on and on and on and on and on...


The spirit of William McGonnagall clearly lingered on and on and on and on and on as well

 Tongue

a bit like the bloody film. I'd double-lock the door meself, turn off the lights and hide under the table.


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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #216 on: August 14, 2021, 10:29:28 am »

Ah-ha! You set a trap for the unwary: the music for that film about The Titanic, A Night to Remember was composed by the excellent William Alwyn; James Horner did the 1997 film Titanic.

Mmmmm, cheese, lovely cheese...

...which pretty much sums up James Cameron's talking-picture.

 Wink

Near, far, wherever you are
I believe that the heart does go on.
Once more you open the door
And you're here in my heart
And my heart will go on and on and on and on and on...


The spirit of William McGonnagall clearly lingered on and on and on and on and on as well

 Tongue

a bit like the bloody film. I'd double-lock the door meself, turn off the lights and hide under the table.


Aye, that it did!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #217 on: August 14, 2021, 10:43:01 am »

Ah-ha! You set a trap for the unwary: the music for that film about The Titanic, A Night to Remember was composed by the excellent William Alwyn; James Horner did the 1997 film Titanic.

Mmmmm, cheese, lovely cheese...

...which pretty much sums up James Cameron's talking-picture.

 Wink

Near, far, wherever you are
I believe that the heart does go on.
Once more you open the door
And you're here in my heart
And my heart will go on and on and on and on and on...


The spirit of William McGonnagall clearly lingered on and on and on and on and on as well

 Tongue

a bit like the bloody film. I'd double-lock the door meself, turn off the lights and hide under the table.


Aye, that it did!

Dump the first-half tedium of the Winslet-Di Caprio canoodling and cut straight to the crash-bang-scrape...oh, and ignore any dotty old biddies chuckin' tat into the Atlantic (worra litter lout, eh?).

 Roll Eyes
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #218 on: August 14, 2021, 12:02:16 pm »


Dump the first-half tedium of the Winslet-Di Caprio canoodling and cut straight to the crash-bang-scrape...oh, and ignore any dotty old biddies chuckin' tat into the Atlantic (worra litter lout, eh?).

 Roll Eyes

I have to admit that I've never seen the thing and I've no desire to do so. I'm not much for films except for films noirs, with proper stars such as Joan Crawford, Barbara Stanwyck, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Fred MacMurray, Claude Rains et al. They generally had scores by the Hollywood great too!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #219 on: August 14, 2021, 12:41:41 pm »


Dump the first-half tedium of the Winslet-Di Caprio canoodling and cut straight to the crash-bang-scrape...oh, and ignore any dotty old biddies chuckin' tat into the Atlantic (worra litter lout, eh?).

 Roll Eyes

I have to admit that I've never seen the thing and I've no desire to do so. I'm not much for films except for films noirs, with proper stars such as Joan Crawford, Barbara Stanwyck, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Fred MacMurray, Claude Rains et al. They generally had scores by the Hollywood great too!

I prefer my fillums 1920s style: Stroheim, Lubitsch, Stiller, Sjostrom, Murnau, Lang, Pabst, Walsh, Ingram, Gance, Asquith, Eisenstein, etc. Silent cinema (which was never silent) at its brilliant best.

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #220 on: August 14, 2021, 12:46:22 pm »


Dump the first-half tedium of the Winslet-Di Caprio canoodling and cut straight to the crash-bang-scrape...oh, and ignore any dotty old biddies chuckin' tat into the Atlantic (worra litter lout, eh?).

 Roll Eyes

I have to admit that I've never seen the thing and I've no desire to do so. I'm not much for films except for films noirs, with proper stars such as Joan Crawford, Barbara Stanwyck, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Fred MacMurray, Claude Rains et al. They generally had scores by the Hollywood great too!

I prefer my fillums 1920s style: Stroheim, Lubitsch, Stiller, Sjostrom, Murnau, Lang, Pabst, Walsh, Ingram, Gance, Asquith, Eisenstein, etc. Silent cinema (which was never silent) at its brilliant best.

 Smiley

Blimey, and I thought I lived in the past! Seriously, though, the films you are interested in count as an art form and so I can understand the appeal (especially the gothic style of Murnau).
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #221 on: August 14, 2021, 12:58:15 pm »


Dump the first-half tedium of the Winslet-Di Caprio canoodling and cut straight to the crash-bang-scrape...oh, and ignore any dotty old biddies chuckin' tat into the Atlantic (worra litter lout, eh?).

 Roll Eyes

I have to admit that I've never seen the thing and I've no desire to do so. I'm not much for films except for films noirs, with proper stars such as Joan Crawford, Barbara Stanwyck, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Fred MacMurray, Claude Rains et al. They generally had scores by the Hollywood great too!

I prefer my fillums 1920s style: Stroheim, Lubitsch, Stiller, Sjostrom, Murnau, Lang, Pabst, Walsh, Ingram, Gance, Asquith, Eisenstein, etc. Silent cinema (which was never silent) at its brilliant best.

 Smiley

Blimey, and I thought I lived in the past! Seriously, though, the films you are interested in count as an art form and so I can understand the appeal (especially the gothic style of Murnau).

Indeed they are! I would recommend Silent Magic by Ivan Butler (Columbus Books, 1987) for an enthusiast's view (he saw them first-hand when they were mesmerising nitrate prints)...

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #222 on: August 14, 2021, 01:08:39 pm »



Indeed they are! I would recommend Silent Magic by Ivan Butler (Columbus Books, 1987) for an enthusiast's view (he saw them first-hand when they were mesmerising nitrate prints)...

 Smiley

...most of which have probably spontaneously combutsed by now. Good job they managed to preserve and copy the majority of them before that happened.
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #223 on: August 14, 2021, 01:34:04 pm »



Indeed they are! I would recommend Silent Magic by Ivan Butler (Columbus Books, 1987) for an enthusiast's view (he saw them first-hand when they were mesmerising nitrate prints)...

 Smiley

...most of which have probably spontaneously combusted by now. Good job they managed to preserve and copy the majority of them before that happened.

Alas, many key titles by major directors are lost or survive incomplete: seen as ephemera in their day, curatorship was in its infancy. No doubt I'm a Celebrity will be preserved into the after-life and beyond, worra pile o' crap.

Likewise, so much art and music has been lost due to carelessness, the horrors of war and wanton destruction.

 Angry
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #224 on: August 14, 2021, 01:37:25 pm »



Indeed they are! I would recommend Silent Magic by Ivan Butler (Columbus Books, 1987) for an enthusiast's view (he saw them first-hand when they were mesmerising nitrate prints)...

 Smiley

...most of which have probably spontaneously combusted by now. Good job they managed to preserve and copy the majority of them before that happened.

Alas, many key titles by major directors are lost or survive incomplete: seen as ephemera in their day, curatorship was in its infancy. No doubt I'm a Celebrity will be preserved into the after-life and beyond, worra pile o' crap.

Likewise, so much art and music has been lost due to carelessness, the horrors of war and wanton destruction.

 Angry

As if I were not already feeling down in the mouth (and everywhere else)... Sad
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