The Art-Music Forum
September 29, 2021, 02:27:47 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: A place to discover and discuss a wide range of composers and music (both familiar and forgotten), recordings, broadcasts, books and art. Register, contribute and explore!
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

Napoleon's 200th


Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Napoleon's 200th  (Read 272 times)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1325


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2021, 11:25:01 am »


Uh-oh, more thread-derailment ahead, methinks...

 Wink

I seem to be good at that!



 Grin Grin Grin

How kind. Thank you!
 Grin
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2021, 11:47:56 am »


Uh-oh, more thread-derailment ahead, methinks...

 Wink

I seem to be good at that!

Perhaps we should start the AMF Party in a bid to get proper subsidy for the arts...

A noble idea but I fear we'd be on a fool's errand.



I've already outlined a ministerial cabinet...

 Wink

Ah, Secretary of State for Transport! After all, you couldn't do a worse job than Grant Shapps...

 Grin
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1325


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2021, 11:55:40 am »


Ah, Secretary of State for Transport! After all, you couldn't do a worse job than Grant Shapps...

 Grin

Gee, thanks! Undecided
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2021, 02:39:08 pm »

In opera, perhaps?

I recall reading that the theatrical works of Mehul, Cherubini etc. during the Napoleonic period were an influence on Weber - and thence on Romantic opera in general.

And, staying in France, Spontini's works during Napoleon's reign surely set the stage (sorry!) for the French grand operas to come.

I love the whole concept of mid-nineteenth century French Grand Opera, replete with extensive ballets, sumptuous scenery, unlikely plots and casts of thousands as epitomised by Meyerbeer, Herold, Halévy, Gounod, etc. And I relish the fact that Verdi frequently popped ballets into his operas (even Otello, added in 1894 for the Palais Garnier) just to suit Parisian taste...



...ooh la la!

 Wink

Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2021, 10:41:24 am »

It's always puzzled me as to why there was no strong tradition of purely orchestral works in France until Berlioz came along (choral and operatic yes, of course). Perhaps there was and I'm just totally unaware of it...

 Huh
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1325


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2021, 11:11:50 am »

It's always puzzled me as to why there was no strong tradition of purely orchestral works in France until Berlioz came along (choral and operatic yes, of course). Perhaps there was and I'm just totally unaware of it...

 Huh
I'm just consulting my copy of A History of Western Music by Donald J. Grout (required reading in my university days); he writes:

"Paris became an important centre of composition and publication toward the middle of the eighteenth century; a consideable number of German and other foreign composers lived there. Works of the French School included symphonies and, particularly after 1770, a form known as the symphonie concertante, that is, a symphonic work employing two or more solo instruments in addition to the regular orchestra. One of the most noted composers of symphonies in France was a Belgian, François-Joseph Gossec (1734-1829), who came to Paris in 1751 and who afterwards succeeded Rameau as conductor of La Poupelinière's orchestra. Gossec published his first symphonies in 1754.... Among the many composers of symphonies concertantes was Giovanni Giuseppe Cambini (1746-1825), an Italian living at Paris; and a large number of native French composers also participated in the extraordinary flowering of this type of composition in the last quarter of the eighteenth century."


One of those composers of symphonies concertantes not named by Grout was, of course, Joseph Bo(u)logne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges (1745-1799). Gossec wrote a large number of symphonies; enough, it seems to have absolved other French composers of the responsibility of bothering to do so!
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2021, 11:16:04 am »

Thanks, Lionel. It still seems as though Berlioz was the truly pioneering figure in so many ways...

 Grin
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1325


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: May 07, 2021, 11:18:59 am »

Thanks, Lionel. It seems as though Berlioz was a truly pioneering figure in so many ways...

 Grin

Indeed he was. I shouldn't have known all that stuff without consulting old Grout!
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2021, 11:33:48 am »

Thanks, Lionel. It seems as though Berlioz was a truly pioneering figure in so many ways...

 Grin

Indeed he was. I shouldn't have known all that stuff without consulting old Grout!

Grout was still a standard text when I was at University in the 1980s. I doubt he is now.

 Sad

Do students have to read actual books these days? Turning a page must be such an alien concept to many of them...

 Roll Eyes
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1325


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2021, 11:38:35 am »

Thanks, Lionel. It seems as though Berlioz was a truly pioneering figure in so many ways...

 Grin

Indeed he was. I shouldn't have known all that stuff without consulting old Grout!

Grout was still a standard text when I was at University in the 1980s. I doubt he is now.

 Sad

Do students have to read actual books these days? Turning a page must be such an alien concept to many of them...

 Roll Eyes

I can hear them asking, "Book? What's a book?"
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2021, 11:40:10 am »

I can hear them asking, "Book? What's a book?"

Ask Alexa!

 Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes

 Cheesy
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1325


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2021, 11:43:47 am »

I can hear them asking, "Book? What's a book?"

Ask Alexa!

 Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes

 Cheesy
Roll Eyes Sad
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: May 07, 2021, 11:50:56 am »


Do you think if we ask her very nicely she'd email CPO regarding recording Potter and Holbrooke (and Cowen)?

 Huh
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 83
Offline Offline

Posts: 1325


View Profile
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2021, 11:58:02 am »


Do you think if we ask her very nicely, she'd email CPO regarding recording Potter and Holbrooke (and Cowen)?

 Huh
Somehow, I think she'd be confused by such a request. I just replaced Grout in his appointed place on my shelf between William Lovelock's The Examination Fugue and Owen Swindale's Polyphonic Composition. What a walk down Memory Lane that was...
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 77
Offline Offline

Posts: 1880


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: May 07, 2021, 12:03:01 pm »

William Lovelock's The Examination Fugue and Owen Swindale's Polyphonic Composition.

Hmm, not familiar with either of these rib-ticklers. Are there pretty pictures to look at - I do so struggle with words...

 Wink
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum


Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy