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Coleridge-Taylor: Songs


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Author Topic: Coleridge-Taylor: Songs  (Read 266 times)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2021, 07:18:02 pm »

Haven't had chicken nuggets for years!!

Yum, nice with mushy peas 'n' wedges. Ah what gourmet delights await!




Do you know, can you get boil-in-the-bag Crap?
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2021, 07:42:56 pm »

Do you know, can you get boil-in-the-bag Crap?

How's about "Bag-in-the-boil"?

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2021, 09:37:33 pm »

Do you know, can you get boil-in-the-bag Crap?

How's about "Bag-in-the-boil"?



 Grin

When shall we three meet again?
In thunder, lightning, or the jacuzzi?


Hang on a minute... It was Sullivan wot wrote incidental music for Macbeth, not

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

Ta-dah!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2021, 01:28:02 am »

When shall we three meet again?
In thunder, lightning, or the jacuzzi?


Hang on a minute... It was Sullivan wot wrote incidental music for Macbeth, not

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

Ta-dah!

Daintily done.

 Cheesy
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2021, 10:09:29 am »

When shall we three meet again?
In thunder, lightning, or the jacuzzi?


Hang on a minute... It was Sullivan wot wrote incidental music for Macbeth, not

Samuel Coleridge-Taylor

Ta-dah!

Daintily done.

 Cheesy
Thank you, kind sir. For such a fat man I can be surprisingly light on my feet!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2021, 08:18:41 am »

A generally positive review, with some reservations - http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2021/Sep/Coleridge-Taylor-songs-ORC100164.htm

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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2021, 09:42:31 am »


Yes, it is. I only part company with him seriously on his reaction to Big Lady Moon, which he finds 'stubbornly anodyne' and I find 'exquisite' (especially in the version by Felicity Palmer that he refrs to). Still, that's a matter of taste, of course.
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2021, 10:07:22 am »


Yes, it is. I only part company with him seriously on his reaction to Big Lady Moon, which he finds 'stubbornly anodyne' and I find 'exquisite' (especially in the version by Felicity Palmer that he refrs to). Still, that's a matter of taste, of course.

Do you think the recital gives a good overview of S C-T's song output, or could the selection have been different? We need a disc of his part-songs - several are in BIMA:

Dead in the Sierras, Op.67 No.2 (1905); Drake’s Drum (1906); Sea Drift, Op.69 (1908); O Mariners, Out of the Sunlight (1910); The Lee Shore (1911); The Sea Shell (1911); The Evening Star (1911)

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2021, 12:27:56 pm »


Yes, it is. I only part company with him seriously on his reaction to Big Lady Moon, which he finds 'stubbornly anodyne' and I find 'exquisite' (especially in the version by Felicity Palmer that he refrs to). Still, that's a matter of taste, of course.

Do you think the recital gives a good overview of S C-T's song output, or could the selection have been different? We need a disc of his part-songs - several are in BIMA:

Dead in the Sierras, Op.67 No.2 (1905); Drake’s Drum (1906); Sea Drift, Op.69 (1908); O Mariners, Out of the Sunlight (1910); The Lee Shore (1911); The Sea Shell (1911); The Evening Star (1911)

 Smiley

Actually, I do. It's clear that Jonathan Woolf is not terribly in sympathy with what he describes variously as 'dutiful Victoriana' or 'British balladry', whereas some of us are prepared to admit that we are comfortable with both. SC-T wasn't the first or last composer to write what he knew would be popular with his public in order to put food on the table and I think it's ungracious to chastise him and others for doing it. As Mr Woolf confirms, SC-T could produce more profound utterances when the mood took him.

As to the part songs, I entirely agree that we could do with a CD of them, as many are remarkably fine. In my opinion, the best of the lost is Summer is Gone (1911) which crops up occasionally on recordings: notably, this one



which contains all manner of other delights by Sullivan, Stanford, Elgar, Parry, George MacFarren, Robert Pearsall et al,

and on this:

https://www.discogs.com/Lumen-Valo-Gravity/release/18776962 which is a stunning recording by this Finnish group with, again, many other lovely part-songs by Finzi, RVW and so on.
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Albion
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« Reply #24 on: September 12, 2021, 12:40:11 pm »

Actually, I do. It's clear that Jonathan Woolf is not terribly in sympathy with what he describes variously as 'dutiful Victoriana' or 'British balladry', whereas some of us are prepared to admit that we are comfortable with both.

Indeed, if the latest Sullivan songs discs on Chandos had been called "Ballads" it would have no doubt drawn derogatory comments and immediately put the deadening touch of the aspidistra and antimacassar on it. As it is, The Harmonious Echo has been very positively received. Title and marketing are so important when it comes to cloth-eared critics...

 Roll Eyes

...perhaps they may not have even noticed that the quote is from the much-maligned The Lost Chord.
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

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