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Aaron Jay Kernis: Symphony of Meditations (Symphony no. 3)


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Author Topic: Aaron Jay Kernis: Symphony of Meditations (Symphony no. 3)  (Read 192 times)
BrianA
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« on: February 26, 2021, 06:20:14 am »

Has anybody have access to on online/uploadable/downloadable performance of the above?

Thanks in advance!

Brian
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Albion
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« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2021, 06:24:23 am »

Has anybody have access to on online/uploadable/downloadable performance of the above?

Thanks in advance!

Brian

Only one movement I'm afraid, but here it is...

https://soundcloud.com/the-knights/aaron-jay-kernis-symphony-of-meditations-mvt2

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2021, 08:53:09 am »

I rate Kernis. I have a three CDs of his music, including one of Truls Mørk playing his delicious Cello Concerto, Colored Field, and this:



which is also attractive. With any luck, this type of stuff will be the music of the future rather than all that Boulez-school do-do.
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relm1
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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2021, 01:05:15 am »

All his music is very fine, dynamic, and very well conceived.  If you like Christopher Rouse or Lowell Liebermann, you'll find much to enjoy with Kernis.  His Symphonies No. 2 and 4 are also commercially available.
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jonah
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2021, 07:55:07 pm »

Kernis is yet another underrated US composer of symphonies, along with Harris, Creston, Piston, Adler, Bolcom, Rouse et al.
Whilst there are recordings of some symphonies by these composers, there is no comprehensive coverage of their works, let alone complete symphony sets in most cases.  Even ignoring the present Covid-related problems of recording and performing, there seems little interest within most US orchestras to promote their own symphonic legacies, so potential audiences are missing out on a glorious selection of music deserving of multiple hearings.
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relm1
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2021, 01:19:37 am »

Kernis is yet another underrated US composer of symphonies, along with Harris, Creston, Piston, Adler, Bolcom, Rouse et al.
Whilst there are recordings of some symphonies by these composers, there is no comprehensive coverage of their works, let alone complete symphony sets in most cases.  Even ignoring the present Covid-related problems of recording and performing, there seems little interest within most US orchestras to promote their own symphonic legacies, so potential audiences are missing out on a glorious selection of music deserving of multiple hearings.

George Rochberg is also fantastic.  His Symphony No. 6 reminds me of Shostakovitch, Malcolm Arnold, and Bernard Herrmann.  A great cross sample of styles.  His symphonies are epic too, with no. 1 being 65 minutes.  American symphonies are excellent actually because it is a melting pot of ethnicity.  Sort of like how Mahler incorporated pastorals, beer tunes and funeral marches of his bohemian youth in his symphonies, the same was the case with American symphonies with jazz, french, Russian, film, etc., into tragic history.
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2021, 04:27:53 pm »

Kernis is yet another underrated US composer of symphonies, along with Harris, Creston, Piston, Adler, Bolcom, Rouse et al.
Whilst there are recordings of some symphonies by these composers, there is no comprehensive coverage of their works, let alone complete symphony sets in most cases.  Even ignoring the present Covid-related problems of recording and performing, there seems little interest within most US orchestras to promote their own symphonic legacies, so potential audiences are missing out on a glorious selection of music deserving of multiple hearings.

George Rochberg is also fantastic.  His Symphony No. 6 reminds me of Shostakovitch, Malcolm Arnold, and Bernard Herrmann.  A great cross sample of styles.  His symphonies are epic too, with no. 1 being 65 minutes.  American symphonies are excellent actually because it is a melting pot of ethnicity.  Sort of like how Mahler incorporated pastorals, beer tunes and funeral marches of his bohemian youth in his symphonies, the same was the case with American symphonies with jazz, french, Russian, film, etc., into tragic history.
I haven't heard his Rochberg's symphonies,but I read various reviews,most of them enthusiastic! He certainly sounds intriguing. (I'm not familiar with,Kernis). I like allot of American symphonies.Antheil and Mennin & Hanson are three others I like (and Schuman). Mention of Arnold reminds me of Morton Gould's impressive third symphony,which also assimilates popular music,very successfully & interestingly,I think!
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