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Victorian and Edwardian British Artists


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Author Topic: Victorian and Edwardian British Artists  (Read 515 times)
cilgwyn
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« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2021, 05:33:19 pm »

The painting of the bat,is marvelous! They all are! All the more interesting,since I've been struggling to write a novel about the Welsh branch of the Fair Family (Tylwyth Teg) for a number of years!! Roll Eyes Sad
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« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2021, 12:32:33 pm »

Similar in interests to Fitzgerald, if a tad more unstable, was Richard Dadd (1817-1886): probably suffering from paranoid-schizophrenia he murdered his father in 1843 and spent the last forty-three years of his life in the Bethlehem ("Bedlam") and Broadmoor hospitals, where he was encouraged to paint...

https://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2015/07/dangerous-mind-richard-dadd





"Come unto these yellow sands" (1842)



The Halt in the Desert (c.1845)



The Flight out of Egypt (1849-1850)



Sir Alexander Morison (1852)



Contradiction - Oberon and Titania (1858)



Bacchanalian Scene (1862)



The Fairy Feller's Masterstroke (1864)

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
cilgwyn
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« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2021, 12:58:23 pm »

I suppose the most well known "fairy painter. The sad,lurid story obviously creates interest! I think there has been the odd radio & tv program about him? Looking at the fairy painting here,I don't think he was the best one?! But they have a certain intensity about them. To my knowledge,The Fairy Feller's Masterstroke,is the most famous and reproduced,of all? If fairies really,did exist,I think they'd look like the ones in that painting? (More Arthur Machen than Charles Perrault! Shocked)
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2021, 10:19:59 pm »

Hi, folks. Tonight let's remember the exquisite art of the imposingly-named Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale (1871-1945)...





The Gilded Apple (1899)



The Pale Complexion of True Love and the Red Glow of Scorn and Proud Disdain (As You Like It) (1899)



The Cunning Skill to Break a Heart (1900)



The Deceitfulness of Riches (1901)



The Duenna (1901)



In Spring time, the only pretty ring time (As You Like It) (1901)



The Little Foot Page (1905)



The Lover's World (1905)



Is She Not Pure Gold, My Mistress (1908)



Love and the Scarecrow (1908)



June is Dead (1908)



Merlin and Vivien (1910-11)

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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2021, 09:53:01 am »

Marvellous, thank you!
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« Reply #20 on: February 21, 2021, 11:34:33 am »

Quote
Similar in interests to Fitzgerald, if a tad more unstable, was Richard Dadd (1817-1886): probably suffering from paranoid-schizophrenia he murdered his father in 1843 and spent the last forty-three years of his life in the Bethlehem ("Bedlam") and Broadmoor hospitals, where he was encouraged to paint...

Thanks for these -- lovely! This is a name totally unfamiliar to me. The style of the last painting reminds me Arthur Rackham. Is there any connection?
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« Reply #21 on: February 21, 2021, 01:03:16 pm »

Thanks for these -- lovely! This is a name totally unfamiliar to me.

Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale was principally known as an illustrator. Eleanor Fortescue Brickdale's Golden Book of Famous Women (1919) is simply gorgeous, besides being a literary gold-mine...

https://archive.org/details/eleanorfortesque00fort/mode/2up

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« Reply #22 on: February 21, 2021, 05:30:46 pm »

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Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale was principally known as an illustrator. Eleanor Fortescue Brickdale's Golden Book of Famous Women (1919) is simply gorgeous...

This is lovely, and also an unfamiliar name, but actually I was referring to the other painter, Richard Dadd.
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #23 on: February 21, 2021, 06:24:38 pm »

Quote
Similar in interests to Fitzgerald, if a tad more unstable, was Richard Dadd (1817-1886): probably suffering from paranoid-schizophrenia he murdered his father in 1843 and spent the last forty-three years of his life in the Bethlehem ("Bedlam") and Broadmoor hospitals, where he was encouraged to paint...

Thanks for these -- lovely! This is a name totally unfamiliar to me. The style of the last painting reminds me Arthur Rackham. Is there any connection?
Quote
Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale was principally known as an illustrator. Eleanor Fortescue Brickdale's Golden Book of Famous Women (1919) is simply gorgeous...

This is lovely, and also an unfamiliar name, but actually I was referring to the other painter, Richard Dadd.

Oops, sorry Maris! Nope, no direct connection between Dadd and Rackham, but I know exactly what you mean...

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2021, 10:44:45 pm »

Tonight, it's John Roddam Spencer Stanhope (1829-1908)...





Thoughts of the Past (1859)



Robin of Modern Times (1860)



Juliet and the Nurse (1863)



The Wine Press (1864)



The Gentle Music of a Bygone Day (1873)



Love and the Maiden (1877)



The Expulsion from Eden (c.1877)



The Waters of Lethe by the Plains of Elysium (1880)



The Shulamite (c.1882)



Charon and Psyche (c.1883)



Pine Woods (c.1885)



Flora and the Zephyrs (1889)



"Why Seek Ye the Living Among the Dead?" (1896)



The Temptation of Eve (1896)
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« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2021, 01:32:23 am »

Not to everybody's taste, and sometimes accused of lapsing into a static and repetitive style, nevertheless Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898) is a key figure in mid-to-late Victorian art...





The Beguiling of Merlin (1873-74)



The Golden Stairs (1876-80)



The Tree of Forgiveness (1881-81)



King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid (1883)



The Depths of the Sea (1886)



The Tower of Brass (1888)



The Legend of Briar Rose I: The Briar Wood (1885-90)



The Legend of Briar Rose II: The Council Chamber (1885-90)



The Legend of Briar Rose III: The Garden Court (1885-90)



The Legend of Briar Rose IV: The Rose Bower (1885-90)



The Fall of Lucifer (1894)



The Last Sleep of Arthur in Avalon (c.1881-98)
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #26 on: March 11, 2021, 07:56:07 am »

Thank you. Burne-Jones's stuff looks pretty good to me. All right, I can see just from the pictures you have shown us that he does tend to repeat certain tropes but all artists, in whichever medium, tend to have 'fingerprints' that identify them. Think of Vivaldi concertos, for example. Put a brush in the hand of the critic and see if he can do any better than Mr Burne-Jones...
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #27 on: March 19, 2021, 01:35:49 am »

Something for the night-owls (here in the UK, at least): an outstanding proto-symbolist landscape artist, Samuel Palmer (1805-1881). His best work pre-dates the Victorian era...





Early Morning (1825)



A Hilly Scene (1828)



Coming from Evening Church (1830)



A Cornfield by Moonlight with the Evening Star (1830)



Garden at Shoreham (1830)



The Magic Apple Tree (c.1830)



Moonlight, a Landscape with Sheep (1833)



The Weald of Kent (1833-34)
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JP
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« Reply #28 on: March 19, 2021, 09:37:49 am »

What a fascinating and beautiful set of pictures. I wonder if there is the influence of William Blake in there somewhere? Although otherwise, the style comes across as very individual to my very non-specialist eyes.

I was trying to recall where I had heard the name Samuel Palmer before and then I remembered that one of his paintings had inspired an orchestral piece of the same name - "The Valley of Vision" by Philip Sawyers.
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #29 on: March 20, 2021, 08:10:47 am »

I wonder if there is the influence of William Blake in there somewhere?

Yes, there's definitely inspiration from Blake in Palmer's work...

http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/c/corners-of-paradise/

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

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