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Victorian and Edwardian British Artists


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Author Topic: Victorian and Edwardian British Artists  (Read 515 times)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« on: February 07, 2021, 03:01:50 am »

Lord Frederick Leighton (1830-1896):





Cimabue's Celebrated Madonna (1853-1855)



May Sartoris (c.1860)



Dante in Exile (c.1864)



Orpheus and Euridice (1864)



Mrs James Guthrie (c.1864-1866)



Daedalus and Icarus (c.1869)



Hercules Wrestling with Death for the Body of Alcestis (1869-1871)



The Daphnephoria (c.1874-1876)



Cymon and Iphigenia (c.1882-1884)



The Return of Persephone (c.1891)



The Garden of the Hesperides (c.1892)



"And the sea gave up the dead which were in it" (1891-1892)



Flaming June (c.1895)



Perseus, on Pegasus, Hastening to the Rescue of Andromeda (c.1896)

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« Last Edit: July 02, 2021, 07:27:33 am by Albion » Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2021, 03:03:50 am »

Something for the weekend, Sir? Well, that well might be a selection of the best by Sir Edward Poynter (1836-1919). Sometimes referred to as "The Poor Man's Leighton", he was prone to lapse into the "chocolate box" style and, like Alma-Tadema, was susceptible to the charge of blatant titillation but some of his work is worth a gander (Hyperion thought so too when re-packaging Vernon Handley's Bantock recordings)...



Orpheus and Eurydice  (1862)



Faithful Unto Death (1865)



Israel in Egypt (1867)



The Catapult (1868)



Andromeda (1869)



The Prodigal's Return (1869)



The Festival (1875)



The Golden Age (1875)



A Visit to Aesculapius (1880)



The Ides of March (1883)



King Solomon's Visit to the Queen of Sheba (1884-1890)



The Cave of the Storm Nymphs (1903)

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2021, 03:05:58 am »

If Edward Poynter got your blood-pressure up and caused an attack of the vapours, here's something a little different - the "genre painter" par excellence William Powell Frith (1819-1909), best known for his trilogy of vast social canvas included below*. The depiction of the Private View at the Royal Academy (which took place the day before the annual exhibition opened to the public) includes Leighton (centre with back turned), Oscar Wilde (with his note-book in from of the boy in green) and Millais (extreme right in the top hat)...



Life at the Seaside (Ramsgate Sands) (1856)*



Derby Day (1858)*



The Crossing Sweeper (1858)



The Railway Station (1862)*



The Marriage of the Prince of Wales 10 March 1863 (1865)



English Archers, Nineteenth Century (The Fair Toxophilites) (1873)



A Private View, The Royal Academy 1881 (1883)

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Albion
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2021, 03:07:27 am »

Oh well, I've got nothing else to do (lol) so here is a personal selection from one of the absolute giants - George Frederic Watts (1817-1904). Stanford's splendid Symphony No.6, Op.94 is dedicated "In honour of the life-work of a great artist: George Frederick Watts":



The Wounded Heron (1837)



Mary Augusta, Lady Holland (c.1843-1844)



Jane 'Jeanie' Elizabeth Hughes (1857-1858)



Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (c.1863-1864)



"Choosing" (Ellen Terry) (1864)



Orpheus and Euridice (1869)



William Morris (1870)



Miss Virginia Julia Dalrymple (1872)



Endymion (c.1872)



Paolo and Francesca (1872-1875)



Freshwater Farm Buildings (1875)



The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: The Rider on the Black Horse (c.1878)



The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: The Rider on the Pale Horse (c.1878)



Time, Death and Judgement (1868-1884)



Helen Euphrosyne Ionides (1881)



Cardinal Manning (1882)



The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: The Rider on the Red Horse (c.1882)



The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: The Rider on the White Horse (c.1874-1883)



Love and Death (1877-1887)



Sunset on the Alps (1888)



Sympathy (1892)



Neptune's Horses (1892)



Love Steering the Boat of Humanity (1899-1901)



The Sower of the Systems (1902)



A Parasite (1903)



Lilian (1904)

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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2021, 08:19:21 pm »

Well, folks, "Tonight's the Night" for Evelyn de Morgan (1855-1919). Let's hear it for "The English Botticelli" (lol)...

https://www.demorgan.org.uk/discover/the-collection/



Sleep and Night (1878)



The Kingdom of Heaven Suffereth Violence and the Violent take it by Force (1878)



Dawn - Aurora Triumphans (1886)



Gloria in Excelsis (1893)



Flora (1894)



Boreas and Orietyia (1896)



Earthbound (1897)



An Angel Piping to the Souls in Hell (1897)



The Red Cross (1914-1916)



The Field of the Slain (1919)

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« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2021, 04:18:30 pm »

Let's start the week with one of the finest - John Everett Millais (1829-1896). One-time pioneering Pre-Raphaelite, later a pillar of the Establishment and criticised for "selling-out" to commercialism. He headed the Royal Academy as successor to Leighton in 1896, but died after only a couple of months in his new post...



Lorenzo and Isabella (1848-1849)



Christ in the House of His Parents (1849-1850)



Ophelia (1851-1852)



A Huguenot, on St. Bartholomew's Day, Refusing to Shield Himself from Danger by Wearing the Roman Catholic Badge (1852)



The Order of Release, 1746 (1852-1853)



John Ruskin (1854)



The Blind Girl (1854-1856)



Autumn Leaves (1855-1856)



The Black Brunswicker (1860)



The Rescue (1855-1862)



The Enemy Sowing Tares (1865)



A Souvenir of Velasquez (1868)



Chill October (1870)



Winter Fuel (1873)



Louise Jopling (1879)



Alfred Tennyson (1881)



Sir Arthur Seymour Sullivan (1888)



Dew-drenched Furze (1889-1890)



Glen Birnam (1890-1891)

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2021, 05:35:42 pm »

Thanks,Albion! I like some of the paintings from this period! And some that have been new,to me!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2021, 06:57:10 pm »

Thanks,Albion! I like some of the paintings from this period! And some that have been new,to me!

Sir, you are most welcome!

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I just thought that perhaps it might be nice to have something to look at of a night other than Coronation Street or the eternally-depressing news-headlines...

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2021, 10:03:47 am »

Thanks,Albion! I like some of the paintings from this period! And some that have been new,to me!

Sir, you are most welcome!

 Smiley

I just thought that perhaps it might be nice to have something to look at of a night other than Coronation Street or the eternally-depressing news-headlines...

 Wink
I agree with cilgwyn. These paintings are so atmospheric, especially Ophelia. And they are somehow so evocative of their era.

While I am still in thrall to the news headlines (albeint on the web, rather than on the television) I haven't watched Coronation Street since Ena Sharples left...
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2021, 10:35:58 pm »

Well, I suppose it's time for some Alma-Tad aka the Dutch-born Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912)...





Phidias Showing the Frieze of the Parthenon to his Friends (1868)



Pottery Painting (1871)



The Vintage Festival (1871)



The Parting Kiss (1882)



The Roses of Heliogabalus (1888)



A Dedication to Bacchus (1889)



Spring (1894)



The Colosseum (1896)



The Baths at Caracalla (1899)



Silver Favourites (1903)



The Finding of Moses (1904)

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« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2021, 10:27:42 am »

Thank you, John. Another wonderful collection. Alma-Tadema's use of light is breathtaking. I have to look at the pictures for quite a long while, otherwise I tend to be left just with a feeling of amazment at the technnical tour de force which each represents but with an under-appreciation of the beauties that result. These picures really are exquisite. The man was certainly a genius.
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« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2021, 01:53:10 pm »

They are marvellous! Stupendous,actually! Imagine having one on your wall at home?!! Grin The damp would be a bit of a problem here,though!! Sad Roll Eyes Mind you! If I could afford one,I wouldn't be living in this dump,would?!! Roll Eyes Grin
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« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2021, 02:43:36 pm »

They are marvellous! Stupendous,actually! Imagine having one on your wall at home?!! Grin The damp would be a bit of a problem here,though!! Sad Roll Eyes Mind you! If I could afford one,I wouldn't be living in this dump,would?!! Roll Eyes Grin
You got that right! I see this on Wikipedia:

In 1960, the Newman Gallery firstly tried to sell, then give away (without success) one of his most celebrated works, The Finding of Moses (1904). The initial purchaser had paid 5,250 for it on its completion, and subsequent sales were for 861 in 1935, 265 in 1942, and it was "bought in" at 252 in 1960 (having failed to meet its reserve), but when the same picture was auctioned at Christies in New York in May 1995, it sold for 1.75 million. On 4 November 2010 it was sold for $35,922,500 to an undisclosed bidder at Sotheby's New York, a new record both for an Alma-Tadema work and for a Victorian painting. On 5 May 2011 his The Meeting of Antony and Cleopatra: 41 BC was sold at the same auction house for $29.2 million.

Phew! Seems it'a all a question of timing.  Wink
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2021, 03:35:01 pm »

Today it's John Anster Fitzgerald (1832-1906), the Victorian fairy painter (a genre all by itself) par excellence: working mainly in waterolour, his painstaking pictures took such a long time to complete that they are often difficult to date...



Fairies in a Bird's Nest (Mazmorra Maldita)



Cock Robin



Who Killed Cock Robin?



Fairy hordes attacking a bat



The Chase of the White Mouse



The stuff that dreams are made of



Cat Among the Fairies



The Artist's Dream



The Intruders



The Fledgling



Fairy Twilight

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2021, 03:47:36 pm »

'Exquisite' is the word. One can see where Arthur Rackham drew his inspiration.
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