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Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875-1912)


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Author Topic: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875-1912)  (Read 1570 times)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #45 on: May 05, 2021, 08:57:35 am »

No, it's the Méditation from Massenet's ThighsCheesy Roll Eyes

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #46 on: May 05, 2021, 10:12:26 am »

No, it's the Méditation from Massenet's ThighsCheesy Roll Eyes

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Sorry, that was awful.
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #47 on: May 06, 2021, 03:17:29 pm »

There is so much more of Coleridge-Taylor's music still to explore: major choral works such as Meg Blane, The Atonement, Kubla Khan and A Tale of Old Japan. I would especially be interested in hearing his incidental music beyond Othello (1911), particularly those scores which he wrote for plays by Stephen Phillips (1864-1915)...



...Herod (1900), Ulysses (1901-02), Nero (1906) and Faust (1908). Unfortunately, much of the material (as happens so often with incidental music) appears to be lost.

 Angry

But what was published looks very promising.

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« Reply #48 on: May 06, 2021, 03:37:43 pm »

There is so much more of Coleridge-Taylor's music still to explore: major choral works such as Meg Blane, The Atonement, Kubla Khan and A Tale of Old Japan. I would especially be interested in hearing his incidental music beyond Othello (1911), particularly those scores which he wrote for plays by Stephen Phillips (1864-1915)...



...Herod (1900), Ulysses (1901-02), Nero (1906) and Faust (1908).

 Smiley

Unfortunately, much of the material (as happens so often with incidental music) appears to be lost.

 Angry


Some of it was published but I don't know whether, in each case, it was in a form which has survived publishers' clear-outs. An orchestral suite from Herod was published by Augener & Co. and a song 'Sleep, sleep O King'  by Enoch. Of Ulysses, three numbers were issued by Novello; of Nero, a suite was again published by Novello and of Faust, a suite was published by Boosey & Co. The MS of Faust is in the British Library but it appears incompete.

It doesn't cetainly doesn't augur well for any revivals. Somebody with more fire left in their belly than I have might undertake some sleuthing around the libraries for any surviving performance materials.
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« Reply #49 on: May 06, 2021, 03:53:44 pm »

Some of it was published but I don't know whether, in each case, it was in a form which has survived publishers' clear-outs. An orchestral suite from Herod was published by Augener & Co. and a song 'Sleep, sleep O King'  by Enoch. Of Ulysses, three numbers were issued by Novello; of Nero, a suite was again published by Novello and of Faust, a suite was published by Booset & Co. The MS of Faust is in the British Library but it appears incompete.

As with comparably high-profile incidental music by such major figures as Sullivan, German and Mackenzie, it is highly unlikely that anything else will come to light beyond what was published.

Theatres generally held onto scores and parts which were subsequently lost or destroyed. I presume this also happened to Sullivan's 1897 Alhambra ballet Victoria and Merrie England, luckily published in piano score and since re-orchestrated.

 Undecided

Fortunately, many of Coleridge-Taylor's scores are now safely housed at the RCM -

https://www.rcm.ac.uk/media/Samuel%20Coleridge-Taylor.pdf

- as Lionel well-knows!!!

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« Reply #50 on: May 06, 2021, 04:20:21 pm »

As with comparably high-profile incidental music by such major figures as Sullivan, German and Mackenzie, it is highly unlikely that anything else will come to light, unfortunately

Sadly, you are probably correcct in that assumption


I presume this also happened to Sullivan's 1897 Alhambra ballet Victoria and Merrie England, luckily published in piano score and since re-orchestrated.


I think I recall reading that the MS of Victoria and Merrie England was destroyed in that fire at Chapell's but I could be wrong.


Luckily, many of Coleridge-Taylor's scores are safely housed at the RCM... as Lionel well-knows!
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I certainly do!

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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #51 on: May 06, 2021, 04:30:43 pm »



I presume this also happened to Sullivan's 1897 Alhambra ballet Victoria and Merrie England, luckily published in piano score and since re-orchestrated.


I think I recall reading that the MS of Victoria and Merrie England was destroyed in that fire at Chapell's but I could be wrong.

It was published by Metzler, so it must have vanished long before the towering inferno that was the Chappell tragedy.

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The whole score was published for solo piano and three suites were also drawn from the ballet: the first survives in its original orchestral form and has been recorded a couple of times, but all three were published as piano duets (dedication copies from Sullivan to Mrs Ronalds are in the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York).

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« Reply #52 on: May 06, 2021, 04:49:22 pm »



I presume this also happened to Sullivan's 1897 Alhambra ballet Victoria and Merrie England, luckily published in piano score and since re-orchestrated.


I think I recall reading that the MS of Victoria and Merrie England was destroyed in that fire at Chapell's but I could be wrong.

It was published by Metzler, so it must have vanished long before the towering inferno that was the Chappell tragedy.

 Shocked

The whole score was published for solo piano and three suites were also drawn from the ballet: the first survives in its original orchestral form and has been recorded a couple of times, but all three were published as piano duets (dedication copies from Sullivan to Mrs Ronalds are in the Pierpont Morgan Library, New York).

 Smiley
Looks like I was wrong, then. It wasn't the first time and, unless I die in the next few minutes, it probably won't be the last!
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« Reply #53 on: May 06, 2021, 05:08:30 pm »

unless I die in the next few minutes, it probably won't be the last!
 Grin

Watch out for that fish-bone!

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Boil-in-the-bag is much the safer option (lovely sauce too) and simpler to "cook" (i.e. boil-in-the bag, lol). I'm sure Coleridge-Taylor would have loved it...

 Cheesy
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« Reply #54 on: May 06, 2021, 05:22:59 pm »

unless I die in the next few minutes, it probably won't be the last!
 Grin

Watch out for that fish-bone!

 Shocked

Boil-in-the-bag is much the safer option (lovely sauce too) and simpler to "cook" (i.e. boil-in-the bag, lol). I'm sure Coleridge-Taylor would have loved it...

 Cheesy
Thanks for the tip!
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« Reply #55 on: May 06, 2021, 05:31:32 pm »

Thanks for the tip!

Yep, I'm AMF's own Fanny Cradock...



 Cheesy

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« Reply #56 on: May 06, 2021, 05:52:03 pm »

Thanks for the tip!

Yep, I'm AMF's own Fanny Cradock...



 Cheesy


What a dreadful thought. You are not in the least like that fearsome old boiler!
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« Reply #57 on: May 06, 2021, 06:01:28 pm »

What a dreadful thought. You are not in the least like that fearsome old boiler-

in-the-bag.



Yum-yum...

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« Reply #58 on: May 06, 2021, 06:04:21 pm »

What a dreadful thought. You are not in the least like that fearsome old boiler-

in-the-bag.



Yum-yum...

 Grin
Looks delightful! Fortunately, I'm not allowed to do any of the cooking around here as my culinary skills do not come up to the standard required...  Embarrassed
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« Reply #59 on: May 06, 2021, 06:32:03 pm »

Looks delightful! Fortunately, I'm not allowed to do any of the cooking around here as my culinary skills do not come up to the standard required...  Embarrassed

Coleridge-Taylor had the same problem - Jessie could be a dragon in the kitchen...



...but her dumplings were much admired.

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Damn, are we back on topic again?

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