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Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900)


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Author Topic: Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900)  (Read 2734 times)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #195 on: July 12, 2021, 09:19:07 am »

I was mistaken (as was Gervase Hughes) in ascribing the overture to The Sorcerer (written for the 1884 revival) to Alfred Cellier - it was in fact concocted by Hamilton Clarke.

 Roll Eyes

I've emended the list. It's by far Clarke's best effort for The Savoy and greatly superior to his Mikado and Ruddigore overtures...

 Smiley

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #196 on: July 12, 2021, 10:24:56 am »

I was mistaken (as was Gervase Hughes) in ascribing the overture to The Sorcerer (written for the 1884 revival) to Alfred Cellier - it was in fact concocted by Hamilton Clarke.

 Roll Eyes

I've emended the list. It's by far Clarke's best effort for The Savoy and greatly superior to his Mikado and Ruddigore overtures...

 Smiley



I do agree with you. It is a shame that Sullivan didn't trouble to compose more of the overtures himself. In these Clarke and Cellier potpourris one misses the clever little development sections that are found in the overtures to Iolanthe and The Yeomen of the Guard. As you know, I yield to no-one in my admiration for Sullivan, but if only he'd spent less time at the gaming table or "dallying" with Fanny Ronalds, we might have had half-a-dozen more little treasures.
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #197 on: July 18, 2021, 10:55:07 pm »

Recommended reading on the partnership that dominated Sullivan's career:

David Eden: Gilbert and Sullivan - the creative conflict (1986)

Gayden Wren: A most ingenious paradox - the art of Gilbert and Sullivan (2001)

Michael Ainger: Gilbert and Sullivan - a dual biography (2002)

Eden raises many controversial issues about Gilbert's personality (which could today be classed as patently autistic) and deals sympathetically with Sullivan's "other" music away from the stage, Wren gives fascinating analysis of the "thematic" basis of each work and Ainger is a generally sound and balanced chronology.

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #198 on: July 19, 2021, 08:10:11 am »

Recommended reading on the partnership that dominated Sullivan's career:

David Eden: Gilbert and Sullivan - the creative conflict (1986)

Gayden Wren: A most ingenious paradox - the art of Gilbert and Sullivan (2001)

Michael Ainger: Gilbert and Sullivan - a dual biography (2002)

Eden raises many controversial issues about Gilbert's personality (which could today be classed as patently autistic) and deals sympathetically with Sullivan's "other" music away from the stage, Wren gives fascinating analysis of the "thematic" basis of each work and Ainger is a generally sound and balanced chronology.

 Smiley
I thank you! Gilbert undoubtedly wrote some very witty (and sometimes sensitive) lyrics and dialogue, and did revolutionise the operatic stage in such ways as use of the chorus and fidelity in costume and scenery (vide the accuracy of the rigging in HMS Pinafore) but he was undoubtedly odd in others: his generally irascible nature, his insistence on trying to get Sullivan to set the 'lozenge plot', and his obsessions with fading middle-aged ladies and with character substitutions as hinges of his plots. Sullivan, however, was just a genius!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #199 on: August 07, 2021, 07:41:06 am »

Slightly tangential, but...

Mystery local buyer hopes to restore Thames site to the very model of its Gilbert and Sullivan days



https://www.theguardian.com/money/2021/aug/05/doyly-carte-island-complete-with-crumbling-mansion-sold-for-3m

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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #200 on: August 07, 2021, 09:40:02 am »

Slightly tangential, but...

Mystery local buyer hopes to restore Thames site to the very model of its Gilbert and Sullivan days



https://www.theguardian.com/money/2021/aug/05/doyly-carte-island-complete-with-crumbling-mansion-sold-for-3m

 Smiley

Thank you for sharing. It's nice to know that it's been purchased by 'a local couple' who 'have committed to doing it up to its former glory' rather than by some ghastly international consortium.
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« Reply #201 on: August 07, 2021, 01:59:47 pm »

You should try to get to know them. Then maybe we will be invited!  Grin
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #202 on: August 07, 2021, 03:11:20 pm »

You should try to get to know them. Then maybe we will be invited!  Grin

Ooh, yes! Afternoon tea and scones, maybe?

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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #203 on: August 07, 2021, 04:04:41 pm »

You should try to get to know them. Then maybe we will be invited!  Grin

Ooh, yes! Afternoon tea and scones, maybe?

Do I espy clotted cream? Better get me table spoon ready...

 Grin

...I'll bet Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900) was partial do a goodly dollop (or maybe trollop)...

 Wink
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #204 on: August 07, 2021, 04:08:00 pm »

You should try to get to know them. Then maybe we will be invited!  Grin

Ooh, yes! Afternoon tea and scones, maybe?

Do I espy clotted cream? Better get me table spoon ready...

 Grin

Yeah. No gay Sally Lunns, though! Grin
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #205 on: August 07, 2021, 04:10:10 pm »

You should try to get to know them. Then maybe we will be invited!  Grin

Ooh, yes! Afternoon tea and scones, maybe?

Do I espy clotted cream? Better get me table spoon ready...

 Grin

...I'll bet Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900) was partial do a goodly dollop (or maybe trollop)...

 Wink

Or probably both!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #206 on: August 07, 2021, 04:54:07 pm »

Yeah. No gay Sally Lunns, though! Grin

Sullivan certainly sampled the occasional (f)rollicking bun(s)...



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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #207 on: August 07, 2021, 05:11:24 pm »

Yeah. No gay Sally Lunns, though! Grin

Sullivan certainly sampled the occasional (f)rollicking bun(s)...


 Grin Aye, that he did!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #208 on: August 07, 2021, 05:27:38 pm »

Yeah. No gay Sally Lunns, though! Grin

Sullivan certainly sampled the occasional (f)rollicking bun(s)...


 Grin Aye, that he did!

I don't think any of his eminent contemporaries (Mackenzie, Parry, Cowen, Stanford) were partial to a dalliance in the shrubbery...



...tick that diary entry!

 Cheesy
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #209 on: August 07, 2021, 05:34:54 pm »

Yeah. No gay Sally Lunns, though! Grin

Sullivan certainly sampled the occasional (f)rollicking bun(s)...


 Grin Aye, that he did!

I don't think any of his eminent contemporaries (Mackenzie, Parry, Cowen, Stanford) were partial to a dalliance in the shrubbery...

 Cheesy

Or if they did they were remarkably discreet about it! Wink
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