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Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900)


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Author Topic: Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900)  (Read 2850 times)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #180 on: May 25, 2021, 07:17:10 am »


the CD of old Art's part songs has arrived.

I shall dip in once office hours are over.  Grin

Somehow, I think you'll love it!


I'm sure I shall!  Grin

Well?



I do counsel that your playtime... Good old Basil Hood 'n' Edward German, eh?



 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #181 on: May 25, 2021, 08:41:38 am »


the CD of old Art's part songs has arrived.

I shall dip in once office hours are over.  Grin

Somehow, I think you'll love it!


I'm sure I shall!  Grin

Well?


Listening before the office opens! Thank you for the suggestion that I should get this lovely CD. The performances are sensitive: crisp and bright in the jollier numbers and with a fine, sustained legato when appropriate. Good production values too. I need say nothing about the music, of course, other than it's sublime!
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patmos.beje
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« Reply #182 on: May 27, 2021, 07:33:36 pm »

 
Prior to 2019 Sullivan was a composer I had little interest in.  I always had The Mikado and H.M.S. Pinafore on my portable music players and I did buy The Golden Legend when Hyperion released it, but I was not fond of it.

I tried for years to find the ‘Sullivan’ choral piece that is performed, in extracts, in the 1951 Robert Donat film The Magic Box.  I only learned, a couple of years ago, the piece was in fact by William Alwyn, in the style of Sullivan!  This is mentioned in a biography on Alwyn which I found in Google books.  The biography, if I remember correctly, says Alwyn played Sullivan in the film but elsewhere Muir Mathieson is credited with the role.  ‘Sullivan’ conducts the piece hence my conclusion that it was by Sullivan.

However, at the beginning of 2019, seeing The Light of the World CD enthused about on this site, I purchased it along with a couple of other Dutton CDs of Sullivan’s orchestral music.  This led to me exploring all the operettas and stage works.

I keep a list of CDs and Digital downloads I purchase every year.  I see that in 2019 I purchased 33 CDs and downloads.  The first 19 were Sullivan CDs!  There were another 2 Sullivan CD purchases and a lot of Sullivan's music I acquired from elsewhere.

The highlights for me, in such rich pickings, were probably Patience, Iolantha, The Yeomen of the Guard and The Martyr of Antioch.  I also purchased and read, and greatly enjoyed, Arthur Jacobs excellent biography of Sullivan.  If someone had said to me, prior to 2019, that Sullivan was a composer that I would be enthusiastic about, I would not have believed it.

I see above there is the Vanity Fair print of Sullivan from 14 March 1874.  Carried along by my enthusiasm, I purchased this in 2019 to go along with Vanity Fair prints of Mascagni, Mackenzie, Joachim, Sarasate and Kubelik which, framed, adorn my hall wall along with a note Mascagni wrote to the wife of the publisher of the UK version of his opera I Rantzau after it’s sole Covent Garden performance in 1893.  I acquired the Sullivan print on eBay for the modest price of £25.  I subsequently purchased, on eBay later in 2019, the much rarer Vanity Fair print of Gilbert from May 1881 for £250!  A bargain compared to the £700 plus a US seller was offering it for!

So Sullivan was categorically the composer of the year for me in 2019 Smiley Grin Wink
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« Reply #183 on: May 27, 2021, 08:05:30 pm »

Let me offer a very enthusiastic welcome to you as the latest convert to the music of Sullivan! I don't doubt that Albion will want to add a word of two as well. As someone who's been a fan for upwards of 60 years, I can tell you that once you are hooked, you can never escape the charm and power of Suillivan's music! Grin
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« Reply #184 on: May 27, 2021, 08:07:51 pm »

Let me offer a very enthusiastic welcome to you as the latest convert to the music of Sullivan! I don't doubt that Albion will want to add a word of two as well. As someone who's been a fan for upwards of 60 years, I can tell you that once you are hooked, you can never escape the charm and power of Suillivan's music! Grin

Yes I am hooked, after spending most of my life unenthusiastic. Cheesy Grin
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Albion
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« Reply #185 on: May 27, 2021, 08:27:23 pm »

Let me offer a very enthusiastic welcome to you as the latest convert to the music of Sullivan! I don't doubt that Albion will want to add a word of two as well. As someone who's been a fan for upwards of 60 years, I can tell you that once you are hooked, you can never escape the charm and power of Suillivan's music! Grin

Yes I am hooked, after spending most of my life unenthusiastic. Cheesy Grin

Bless you! Sometimes it takes bods like Lionel to act as evangelists. I have been introduced to such wonders over the years through fellow-enthusiasts for all manner of composers. That's what these forums are for - not for dry-as-dust musicological navel-gazing...

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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #186 on: May 27, 2021, 09:46:48 pm »

Let me offer a very enthusiastic welcome to you as the latest convert to the music of Sullivan! I don't doubt that Albion will want to add a word of two as well. As someone who's been a fan for upwards of 60 years, I can tell you that once you are hooked, you can never escape the charm and power of Suillivan's music! Grin

Yes I am hooked, after spending most of my life unenthusiastic. Cheesy Grin

Which only goes to prove that it's never too late for a Damascene conversion! Grin
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #187 on: May 27, 2021, 09:55:13 pm »


Sometimes it takes bods like Lionel to act as evangelists.


Thank you, kind sir. Or, of course, bods like Albion!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #188 on: June 05, 2021, 04:55:09 pm »



The only recording of Sullivan's

Ode On the opening of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 1886


Ode for the occasion of the laying the foundation stone of the Imperial Institite (1887)

The latter is one of the composer's finest "occasional" works and fully deserves a more sympathetic reorchestratration and recording.
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« Reply #189 on: June 05, 2021, 05:58:40 pm »



The only recording of Sullivan's

Ode On the opening of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 1886


Ode for the occasion of the laying the foundation stone of the Imperial Institite (1887)

The latter is one of the composer's finest "occasional" works and fully deserves a more sympathetic reorchestratration and recording.

Who knows? Maybe one of these days... Undecided
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Albion
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« Reply #190 on: July 06, 2021, 11:59:21 am »

The Sir Arthur Sullivan Society has generously made a large number of its previous magazines available online:

https://sullivansociety.org.uk/works-library/?v=79cba1185463#magazine

These cover issues numbers 1 (May 1977) to 86 (Winter 2014/15).

 Smiley
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #191 on: July 06, 2021, 12:05:16 pm »

The Sir Arthur Sullivan Society has generously made a large number of its previous magazines available online:

https://sullivansociety.org.uk/works-library/?v=79cba1185463#magazine

These cover issues numbers 1 (May 1977) to 86 (Winter 2014/15).

 Smiley
What trove of treasures! Thank you for the alert.
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #192 on: July 07, 2021, 12:01:04 pm »

Those with a penchant for tickling the ivories may wile away many an idle hour delighting their neighbours with dance arrangements from Sullivan's operas (those written with Gilbert) -

https://www.gsarchive.net/articles/arrangements/scores.html

I uploaded these to the Gilbert and Sullivan Archive years ago.

 Smiley

I also have the arrangements from: Alfred Cellier's Doris and The Mountebanks; Solomon's The Nautch Girl and The Vicar of Bray; Osmond Carr's His Excellency; Ernest Ford's Jane Annie; Sullivan's Haddon Hall, The Chieftain, Victoria and Merrie England, The Rose of Persia and The Emerald Isle; and Edward German's Merrie England, A Princess of Kensington and Tom Jones. Unfortunately I no longer have the technological capacity to scan and upload...

 Roll Eyes
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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« Reply #193 on: July 11, 2021, 09:08:47 am »

Personally, I'd love to see Hamilton Clark's name on a CD. As the "arranger" of the overtures to The Mikado and Ruddigore (original 1887 version, not the 1921 Geoffrey Toye revamp which now customarily precedes the opera), I think he had more than a modicum of ability. His overtures to Hamlet and The Merchant of Venice would need to be re-orchestrated, but at least piano duet arrangements give you more to play with, as 'twere.

 Wink

For those unaware of the originators of Sullivan's operatic overtures, here's a summary:

The Sapphire Necklace (1863-64) - Sullivan
Cox and Box (1866-67) - Sullivan
The Contrabandista (1867) - no overture, but an introduction by Sullivan
Thespis (1871) - Sullivan (lost)
Trial by Jury (1875) - no overture
The Zoo (1875) - no overture
The Sorcerer (1877) - introduction originally based on Sullivan's incidental music to Henry VIII (1877), overture concocted by Hamilton Clarke (1840-1912) for the 1884 revival
HMS Pinafore (1878) - Alfred Cellier (1844-91)
The Pirates of Penzance (1879-80) - Alfred Cellier
Patience (1881) - Eugen d'Albert (1864-1932)
Iolanthe (1882) - Sullivan
Princess Ida (1883-84) - no overture, but an introduction by Sullivan
The Mikado (1884-85) - Hamilton Clarke
Ruddigore (1886-87) - Hamilton Clarke, replaced with a new overture by Geoffrey Toye (1889-1942) for the 1921 revival
The Yeomen of the Guard (1888) - Sullivan
The Gondoliers (1889) - Sullivan
Ivanhoe (1890-91) - no overture
Haddon Hall (1892) - no overture, but an introduction (with chorus behind the scenes) by Sullivan
Utopia Limited (1893) - no overture, but an introduction by Sullivan (unpublished and lost, based on the Act II Drawing-Room Music)
The Chieftain (1894) - no overture, but an introduction by Sullivan
The Grand Duke (1895-96) - Sullivan
The Beauty Stone (1897-98) - no overture, but an introduction by Sullivan
The Rose of Persia (1899) - no overture, but an introduction by Sullivan
The Emerald Isle (1900) - no overture, but an introduction by Edward German (1862-1936) composed in 1901 following Sullivan's death


 Smiley

Well - DID Sullivan in fact write the rather disappointing overture to The Gondoliers or was it Alfred Cellier? See page 13 of

https://sullivansociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Magazine-62.pdf

 Undecided
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #194 on: July 11, 2021, 09:40:51 am »


Well - DID Sullivan in fact write the rather disappointing overture to The Gondoliers or was it Alfred Cellier? See page 13 of

https://sullivansociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Magazine-62.pdf

 Undecided

Curiouser and curiouser! I quote Gervase Hughes from The Music of Arthur Sullivan (Macmillan, 1960) page 140: "one is still left with a feeling of regret that the splendid opening [of the Gondoliers Overture] has never fulfilled its promise, and would gladly acquit Sullivan of being anything more than being an accessory before the fact. But a note in his diary five days prior to the production reads: 'After dinner wrote, arranged and scored the overture, finishing at 3 A.M.' (He adds that Gilbert dropped in at 11.15 pm, to discuss some final details; could this visit have put him off his stroke?)"

Leaving aside the notion that Sullivan decided to dump what he had written and contact Alfred Cellier to help, as described in the magazine article, one of those accounts must be 'mis-remembered'.
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