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Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900)


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Author Topic: Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900)  (Read 2734 times)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2021, 10:18:32 am »

I've put the excerpts from The Martyr of Antioch into the archive, together with the 1972 BBC broadcast of The Zoo and two different files of excerpts from Ivanhoe.

One of these is the 1995 broadcast included in the "Britannia at the Opera" series conducted by Martyn Brabbins, but I can't identify the other performance. Can anyone help to pin it down for me?

 Huh

Meanwhile, I am in the process of upgrading the 1989 BBC broadcasts of the complete series of operas with Gilbert.

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #16 on: February 08, 2021, 01:53:00 am »









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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2021, 01:56:24 am »



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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2021, 02:52:26 am »

Thank you Albion  for breathing new life into this forum... I tried for a while then got busy with life and work....  good to see new life here !!!
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2021, 05:57:42 am »

I often wonder why Sullivan spent so much time at (and preparing for) the Leeds Festivals through the 1880s and 1890s. I guess he must simply have enjoyed being a performing musician in some sense, rather than just ploughing the composer's lonely furrow.

Sullivan was one of the finest and most prominent British conductors between 1875 and 1900, both nationally and internationally...



https://boydellandbrewer.com/9781783271450/conductors-in-britain-1870-1914/

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also, by some insomniac or other...

https://www.gsarchive.net/articles/sull_proms/index.html

https://www.gsarchive.net/articles/sull_glasgow/index.html

https://www.gsarchive.net/articles/sull_aquarium/index.html

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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #20 on: February 10, 2021, 12:22:02 pm »

Fascinating stuff, John, thank you.  I have now started to wonder whether The Rich Attorney's 'elderly, ugly daughter' (she who 'may very well pass for forty-three in the dusk, with a light behind her'), was inspired by Arthur Roberts's Royal Aquarium 'lady who was forty-three'. Or perhaps vice versa!

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« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2021, 01:19:12 pm »

I have now started to wonder whether The Rich Attorney's 'elderly, ugly daughter' (she who 'may very well pass for forty-three in the dusk, with a light behind her'), was inspired by Arthur Roberts's Royal Aquarium 'lady who was forty-three'. Or perhaps vice versa!

 Grin

Trial by Jury first performed 25 March 1875, the Royal Aquarium opening ceremony 22 January 1876...

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« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2021, 01:44:47 pm »

Quote
'She may very well pass for forty-three in the dusk, with a light behind her'

Yes,I always remember that line! Very droll! Very amusing! First heard,as a youngster,on an Lp,borrowed from the library. The,inimitable,John Reed. I think it would have been the 1975 Decca recording (Rec:74) as the library favoured some of the later ones (being,relatively,new releases then & the D'Oyly Carte still,thankfully,alive & kicking!) And,by the way,a successful quote! Grin

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« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2021, 03:17:31 pm »

I have now started to wonder whether The Rich Attorney's 'elderly, ugly daughter' (she who 'may very well pass for forty-three in the dusk, with a light behind her'), was inspired by Arthur Roberts's Royal Aquarium 'lady who was forty-three'. Or perhaps vice versa!

 Grin

Trial by Jury first performed 25 March 1875, the Royal Aquarium opening ceremony 22 January 1876...

 Wink
That answers that, then.

I had the pleasure of conducting Trial (amongst many other G&S operas) when I was MD of the Southend Operatic & Dramatic Society (SODS!) in the 1970s and 1980s, "A many years ago, When I was young and charming..."

(I never practised baby-farming, though, for the avoidance of doubt).

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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2021, 11:05:13 pm »

A parallel is, perhaps, Sullivan's splendid and pioneering "Cello Concerto" (1866) which was frequently referred to as a "Concertino" during his lifetime...

 Smiley

Thank the stars for Charles Mackerras's phenomenal memory in collaborating on the reconstruction (in 1986) of Sullivan's score based on his 1953 performance (before the score was burnt in the 1964 catastrophic Chappell & Co. warehouse fire)...

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That's quite uncanny, John. I was thinking about Mackerras and Sullivan's concerto only this morning. Its proportions are quite peculiar in that the first movement is only about three-and-a-half minutes long whereas the second and third are both twice that. It is, indeed, much more like a 'Concertino' or what our German friends would call a 'Konzertstück' (the title that Schumann originally gave to his cello concerto, oddly enough). The first movement is in the nature of an introduction to the rest of the piece, rather than a movement in its own right.

I really do think that Sullivan's piece for cello and orchestra (whatever you want to call it) works successfully in it's own terms of a glorious middle andante espressivo framed by introductory and resolutionary linked movements...



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« Reply #25 on: February 11, 2021, 08:56:40 am »

A parallel is, perhaps, Sullivan's splendid and pioneering "Cello Concerto" (1866) which was frequently referred to as a "Concertino" during his lifetime...

 Smiley

Thank the stars for Charles Mackerras's phenomenal memory in collaborating on the reconstruction (in 1986) of Sullivan's score based on his 1953 performance (before the score was burnt in the 1964 catastrophic Chappell & Co. warehouse fire)...

 Roll Eyes

That's quite uncanny, John. I was thinking about Mackerras and Sullivan's concerto only this morning. Its proportions are quite peculiar in that the first movement is only about three-and-a-half minutes long whereas the second and third are both twice that. It is, indeed, much more like a 'Concertino' or what our German friends would call a 'Konzertstück' (the title that Schumann originally gave to his cello concerto, oddly enough). The first movement is in the nature of an introduction to the rest of the piece, rather than a movement in its own right.

I really do think that Sullivan's piece for cello and orchestra (whatever you want to call it) works successfully in it's own terms of a glorious middle andante espressivo framed by introductory and resolutionary linked movements...



 Wink
Oh yes, I quite agree with you and I'm sure Will Smith will too, once he gets used to te idea! Sullivan's piece is quite lovely but as I am such a fan of his (with or without WSG) I always have to take a step back to think whether I'm judging a piece fairly or getting carried away by my general enthusiasm! 
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #26 on: February 20, 2021, 09:33:25 am »

For anyone interested in Sullivan's career as a conductor and his subsequent reputation, Anne Stanyon's 2017 doctoral thesis Sir Arthur Sullivan, the 1898 Leeds Festival and Beyond is indispensable. It meticulously charts Sullivan's contemporary reception, the genesis of The Beauty Stone and his effective removal from the post of conductor-in-chief by the Leeds Festival Committee in 1899, largely due to the machinations of Stanford. It also contains many fascinating contemporary cartoons.

See http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,7216.msg36853/topicseen.html#msg36853

A real page-turner!

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« Reply #27 on: February 20, 2021, 11:18:07 am »

For anyone interested in Sullivan's career as a conductor and his subsequent reputation, Anne Stanyon's 2017 doctoral thesis Sir Arthur Sullivan, the 1898 Leeds Festival and Beyond is indispensable. It meticulously charts Sullivan's contemporary reception, the genesis of The Beauty Stone and his effective removal from the post of conductor-in-chief by the Leeds Festival Committee in 1899, largely due to the machinations of Stanford. It also contains many fascinating contemporary cartoons.

It is available online at Academia.edu, but here is a copy -

http://www.mediafire.com/file/ml631fgj1iaxbwz/Stanyon%252C_Anne_-_Sir_Arthur_Sullivan%252C_the_1898_Leeds_Festival_and_Beyond_%2528PhD%252C_2017%2529.pdf/file

A real page-turner!

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Thank you, John. That's my weekend reading sorted.


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« Reply #28 on: February 21, 2021, 07:49:57 pm »

For anyone interested in Sullivan's career as a conductor and his subsequent reputation, Anne Stanyon's 2017 doctoral thesis Sir Arthur Sullivan, the 1898 Leeds Festival and Beyond is indispensable.


A real page-turner!

 Smiley

Having now turned (and read!) all its pages I can concur with that verdict. The aspect that most piqued my interest concerned his gifts as a conductor, which Anne Stanyon gives an insight into, rather than all the distasteful machinations employed in ousting him from the conductorship of the Leeds Festival

I have what I think is a pretty in-depth knowldge of dear old Sir Arthur's compositional output (and I love almost every bar of it) but I had no idea what a fine conductor he was. He was clearly able to bring all his towering musicianship to bear on the preperation of his (sometimes very original) interpretations. Equally, he was able to bring all his equability and charm to bear on his relations with choirs and orchestras, with the result that they gave of their best because they loved him. It's no mean feat to get the members of an orchestra to respect a conductor, but to get them to adore one, as the Leeds band clearly did Sullivan, is nothing short of remarkable. They must have admired his skill and knowledge, and they responded to his manner, not flambouyant or autocratic but genial and businesslike. He knew how best to utilise limited rehearsal time (a rare quality which bands always admire) within which he was able, through words and art of gesture, to convey exactly what he wanted.

Moreover, as far as the Leeds Fesitval was concerned, he proved to be a very able 'fixer' and administrator, and to have a shrewd head for business. It was only after he'd gone that they realised what they'd lost as the profits, which increased with every festival under his leadership, dwindled with every festival under Stanford's until they finally started actually losing money.

I didn't think I could admire Sullivan any more than I already did but it turns out that I can (despite the fact that he was pretty rude about Brahms's 3rd Symphony! Still, we all have our foibles). 
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« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2021, 08:03:04 pm »

Moreover, as far as the Leeds Fesitval was concerned, he proved to be a very able 'fixer' and administrator, and to have a shrewd head for business. It was only after he'd gone that they realised what they'd lost as the profits, which increased with every festival under his leadership, dwindled with every festival under Stanford's until they finally started actually losing money.



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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

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