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United States Music


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Author Topic: United States Music  (Read 29598 times)
jowcol
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« Reply #120 on: October 11, 2013, 04:17:52 pm »

That is certainly an enormous amount of music, for which many thanks.

For those like me with limited bandwidth, can you recommend a good starting point? I don't believe I've ever knowingly heard a note of Hovhaness before.

His second symphony is in the first file-- it's his most famous.   

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kyjo
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« Reply #121 on: October 11, 2013, 04:32:25 pm »

Indeed, a huge thank you from me to both jowcol and Karl Miller! Smiley Re dyn's post, I woud recommend his Symphony no. 50 Mount St. Helens as a good starting point (along with no. 2). That last movement is something else!
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Schuylkill
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« Reply #122 on: October 11, 2013, 06:34:13 pm »

These are indeed wonderful. Several of these Hovhaness symphonies will be new to me, and I am hopeful that I will experience some of them in better sound - number 28 is a case in point. I am perplexed by the fist two movements of number 27 as well as all 26. They came through from MediaFire without issue but when I want to hear them there is no sound. My MAC tells me there is a there there but no sound. The remaining movements of 27 are fine, as are several others to which I have listened, including 29 whose premiere I attended. The date is May 6th, 1977. Has anyone else had problems? Tx from Schuylkill88.
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Holger
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« Reply #123 on: October 11, 2013, 07:12:08 pm »

These are indeed wonderful. Several of these Hovhaness symphonies will be new to me, and I am hopeful that I will experience some of them in better sound - number 28 is a case in point. I am perplexed by the fist two movements of number 27 as well as all 26. They came through from MediaFire without issue but when I want to hear them there is no sound. My MAC tells me there is a there there but no sound. The remaining movements of 27 are fine, as are several others to which I have listened, including 29 whose premiere I attended. The date is May 6th, 1977. Has anyone else had problems? Tx from Schuylkill88.

First, I wish to thank Karl and John a lot as well. I haven't focused too much on Hovhaness' music so far, but it is truly wonderful to get so many symphonies at once.

Now, I only played Nos. 1&67 so far, but in reaction to Schuylkill's alert I tried out the files in question as well and it is true that the same also holds for me: the first two movements of No. 27 and the complete No. 26 are actually not present, that is, there are mp3s with certain durations but nothing can be heard when playing them. Seems to be some kind of error.
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calyptorhynchus
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« Reply #124 on: October 12, 2013, 01:43:01 am »

Quote

Now, I only played Nos. 1&67 so far, but in reaction to Schuylkill's alert I tried out the files in question as well and it is true that the same also holds for me: the first two movements of No. 27 and the complete No. 26 are actually not present, that is, there are mp3s with certain durations but nothing can be heard when playing them. Seems to be some kind of error.

I have the same probes with the first two movements of 34 (last three are fine).

(And thanks for all this fine music!)
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jowcol
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« Reply #125 on: October 12, 2013, 04:11:54 pm »

Gentlemen--
Thanks for your observations-- I'll be looking into these, and re-rip or upload.  I know that one one of the discs in question, I had some odd behavior when I was ripping them. 

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gabriel
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« Reply #126 on: October 12, 2013, 11:32:42 pm »

Thanks a lot to Karl Miller and jowcol for your uploads of the Alan Hovhaness symphonies.
I am not an AH fan (although I´ve got thirty or more of his works), mainly of those contemplative works with almost no changes... but there are really beautiful moments too.
Thanks again for the effort!
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« Reply #127 on: October 13, 2013, 02:29:18 am »

Symphony No.13 is described on the file as subtitled "Visit to a Holy Mountain". I think that this is wrong. No.13 is entitled "Ardent Song". No.20 is correctly subtitled "Three Journeys to a Holy Mountain".

(In a project of such magnitude there were bound to be hiccups Grin)
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« Reply #128 on: October 14, 2013, 10:09:11 am »

If forced to choose, Nos. 6 and 2 are my absolute favorites..
His music is superb, but after a while you begin to feel it is all woven from the same cloth.
Not a bad thing, unless you are expecting big differences from work to work..
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Schuylkill
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« Reply #129 on: October 17, 2013, 02:02:15 am »

We are not quite out of the woods yet with respect to the errata for Hovhaness 26, alas. There are two 4th movements at 15:15 but no 3rd. Thanks for the remediation for 34!
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jowcol
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« Reply #130 on: October 17, 2013, 02:08:33 am »



I'll look into the missing movement.
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« Reply #131 on: October 17, 2013, 01:55:29 pm »

As I said in a former message, I am really grateful to Karl Miller and jowcol for their uploads of the Hovhaness symphonies. I did have an judgment of his contemplative music, based on the more than thirty of his works in my CDs. Listening to the new ones, I am convinced that 64 symphonies can be "compressed" in maybe three or four. My thinking is that If I liked listening to modal music, by far I´d prefer Fantasy/Tallis of RVW.
Surely a lot of you would not agree with me!! (Sorry for my poor English)

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jowcol
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« Reply #132 on: October 26, 2013, 07:19:53 pm »

i am suspecting that the remaining issue in Symphony 26 in the Hovhaness collection is that the "third" track was simply repeated twice.  I've not yet heard back from Karl, but unless someone knows the score, I can't be sure that there was a 4th movement.

Gabriel-- no need to apologize-- we all react differently to different music.  I LOVE modal music-- I have a lot of Hindustani classical, modal jazz, and blues in my collection.  I would say, in my opinion, that Hovhaness repeated himself a lot less than Steve Reich. (I LOVE a few of Reich's works, but I don't think one needs to learn his whole cataog.)
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jowcol
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« Reply #133 on: October 26, 2013, 07:20:35 pm »

Music of Don Gillis


From the collection of Karl Miller

All recordings are from broadcasts, personal collection, and LPs (as noted).  To my knowledge, none of these have been made commercially available in digital form.

Link is in the downloads section.


Volume 1

Adoration at Eventide for Strings
Salt Lake Community Orchestra of Westminster College

Bayou Song for Band
performers unknown

Cathedral Square for Orchestra
performers unknown

Dialogue for Trombone and Band
Lew Gillis, trombone, TCU Band
Don Gillis, conductor
Source LP: Austin Records WAM 33 6527


Frontiersman, a ballet for Band
Peformers unknown

Men of Music
US Army Band/Col. Sam Loboda, Cond.

Night Song for Orchestra
Performers unknown

Silhouettes for violin, cello, and piano
Daniel Gullet, violin; Naum Beditzky, cello; Joseph Kahn, piano

Sinfonia for Brass
Performers Unknown

Downbeat for Narrator and Band
Capt. Allen Crowell, narr.
US Army Band, Col. Samuel R. Loboda


Rhapsody for Harp and Orchestra
Edward Vito, harp
NBC Symphony Orchestra/Don Gillis


Variations on a Kitchen Sink for Kitchen Utensils and Band
Performers Unknown

Volume 2

Touchtone Concerto for 4 Touchtone Phones and Band
Performers Unknown

Streamliner for Brass Choir
Cincinnnatti Conservatory of Music, Brass/Choir
Ernest Glover, cond.


Quintet for Woodwinds No. 1
Interlochen Academy Faculty WW Quintet

Quintet for Woodwinds No. 2
Performers unknown

Quintet for Woodwinds No. 3 "Five Piece Combo"
Peformers Unknown

This is Our America for Chorus and Orchestra
US Army Band and Chorus
Col. Samuel Loboda, conductor



Overture, America's Gifted Youth
US Army Band and Chorus
Col. Samuel Loboda, conductor



Wikipedia Bio:

Don Gillis (composer)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Donald Eugene Gillis (June 17, 1912–January 10, 1978) was a US composer, conductor and teacher. The composition which has gained him most recognition is his orchestral Symphony No. 5½, A Symphony for Fun.
Contents



Biography

Don Gillis was born in Cameron, Missouri. His family moved to Fort Worth, Texas, and he studied at Texas Christian University, playing trombone and acting as assistant director of the university band. He graduated in 1935, and obtained a masters degree from North Texas State University in 1943.

He became production director for the radio station WBAP, later moving to NBC where he became producer for the NBC Symphony Orchestra during the tenure of its conductor Arturo Toscanini. He held several teaching posts at academic institutions in the southern United States during his career, and also helped to found the Symphony of the Air orchestra. Gillis produced several NBC radio programs, including "Serenade to America" and "NBC Concert Hour." After Toscanini retired in 1954 Gillis, serving as president of the Symphony Foundation of America, was instrumental in helping to form the Symphony of the Air, using members of the old NBC Symphony. Gillis also produced the radio program "Toscanini: The Man Behind the Legend," which ran for several years on NBC after the Italian conductor's death.

In 1973 he joined the faculty of the University of South Carolina where he founded, and was chairman of the Institute for Media Arts and was instrumental in establishing the Instructional Services Center. Dr. Gillis also served as USC's Composer-in-residence until his death.

He died in Columbia, South Carolina, on January 10, 1978. His papers and an extensive collection of recorded material are housed at the University of North Texas in Denton.

Music

Despite his administrative responsibilities, Gillis was a prolific composer, writing ten orchestral symphonies, tone poems like Portrait of a Frontier Town, piano concertos, rhapsodies for harp and orchestra, and six string quartets. He also composed a wide variety of band music. Gillis is best remembered as the composer of his Symphony No. 5½, A Symphony for Fun, originally performed by Arturo Toscanini and the NBC Symphony Orchestra during a September 21, 1947, broadcast concert that Gillis also produced; it was preserved on transcription discs but not commercially issued. Since 2005, his symphonies have been recorded on the Albany Records label.

Gillis sought to interpret contemporary American culture musically. His music drew upon popular material, particularly emphasizing jazz, which he considered a revitalizing element in American music. He assimilated popular influences in a simple and straightforward style aimed at communicating with his audiences through an emphasis on clear, accessible, melodic writing. Many of his works are best characterized as fun and full of humor.

UNT Website:


UNT Music Library Celebrates Don Gillis Centennial
By:
Music

“Nothing has been left out of here except a brief mention of the spawning habits of the lamprey eel and a recipe for fried grits.” – Don Gillis, The Unfinished Symphony Conductor (1967)

The UNT Music Library celebrates the 100th birthday of Don Gillis, a musician, composer, educator, and producer, and UNT alumnus (MM, 1941) who had some impact on nearly every major institution of higher education in North Texas, including Texas Christian University, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Southern Methodist University, Dallas Baptist University, and the University of North Texas.

Gillis was born in Cameron, Missouri on June 17, 1912. After moving to Texas in 1930, he studied composition with Don Mixson at Texas Christian University, and then worked as a band director at TCU, during which time he also played trombone in the staff orchestra for the Fort Worth radio station WBAP, directed a symphony at Polytechnic Baptist Church in Fort Worth, taught at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and Fort Worth Public Schools, and composed prolifically. Gillis’ early compositions established traits that endured throughout his career, with an emphasis on American and sacred themes, good-humored optimism, and the influence of American music, and particularly jazz.

The early 1940s were a period of rapid transition for Gillis, as he was awarded the first master's degree in music composition at UNT (then North Texas State Teachers College) in 1941 for his Symphony No. 1: An American Symphony, and quickly moved from being Director of Productions at WBAP (1941-43) to being a producer for NBC Radio in Chicago (1943), and a producer and script writer for the NBC Symphony Orchestra, directed by Arturo Toscanini in New York City, a year later. Gillis’ Symphony 5 ½: A Symphony for Fun (1947), premiered by Arthur Fiedler with the Boston Pops, and was one of few American works performed by Toscanini, who pronounced Gillis' name “Zhee-li.”

In 1965, Gillis discussed the genesis of that symphony, and his working relationship with Toscanini (Track 5). Later that year, he described Toscanini's high praise for Symphony No. 5 ½ (Track 10):

He had decided to become a conductor instead of a composer, but he said, "you know, I didn't have my 'C-major chord' like Beethoven. You can hear a Beethoven and immediately know it's Beethoven ... You have found your 'C-major chord'."

Upon Toscanini’s retirement in 1954, NBC disbanded its orchestra, but Gillis played a major role in reconstituting it as the Symphony of the Air, as president of its supervising organization, the Symphony Foundation of America. In its first season, Gillis accompanied the orchestra on a State Department-sponsored tour of Asia. After serving as the Sunday producer for NBC Radio's Monitor program in 1955-56 and as vice president of the Interlochen Music Camp in Michigan from 1958 through 1961, Gillis produced the series Toscanini: The Man Behind the Legend for NBC radio, presented by announcer Ben Grauer, from 1963-1967, including a special series for the centennial of Toscanini’s birth.

Gillis returned to Texas and served as chair of the music department of Southern Methodist University in Dallas from 1967 to 1968, and as the chair of the arts department and director of instructional media at Dallas Baptist College from 1968 until 1973. While at DBC, Gillis assisted significantly with the UNT (then NTSU) Music Library’s acquisition of the WBAP radio orchestra’s sheet music collection.

In April of 1974, Gillis was honored as a distinguished NT alumnus, and in September of the same year, announced plans to donate his collection of scores, papers, tapes, and photos to the Music Library.

In 1973, Gillis took the position of Chair of the Institute of Media Arts at the University of South Carolina, where he remained until his death in 1978.

A century after his birth, Gillis leaves behind a twin legacy for music in America, through his own compositions, and through his work with Toscanini. The Music Library is pleased to maintain his collection for the continued use of scholars and musician
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kyjo
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« Reply #134 on: October 26, 2013, 09:39:25 pm »

I know Colin will be thrilled with your recent Gillis upload, jowcol! Grin

I can enjoy Gillis' music, but I have to be in the right mood. As Colin so rightfully has pointed out, why are there five Diamond symphonies awaiting recording yet all of those of Gillis have been recorded?

BTW jowcol, no disrespect to your uploads! Keep up the good work! Smiley
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