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United States Music


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BrianA
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« Reply #90 on: April 26, 2013, 03:23:13 pm »

Many thanks to you, Jowcol, as well as the ubiquitous Mr Miller, for the Antheil, Blackwood, and Bolcolm selections, most especially the Blackwood, for whose music (as you've probably gathered by now) I've developed a bit of an obsession.  I really wish Cedille would record the middle three symphonies, but until then I'll happily depend on your generosity.  Any of Blackwood's microtonal works would be happily and gratefully received!
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jowcol
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« Reply #91 on: April 28, 2013, 05:27:09 pm »

Samuel Barber:  Symphony # 2

Minnesota Orchestra
Marin Alsop, Director
April 16, 1992

From the collection of Karl Miller
Personal recording of live performance.  Not commercially released to my knowledge.

 The second Symphony was probably one of the more controversial works in the Barber Catalog, as the composer himself wanted to withdraw the work from publication. 

Wikipedia Entry

Symphony No. 2 (Samuel Barber)

Symphony No. 2, op. 19 is a three-movement work for orchestra by American composer Samuel Barber. The 25-minute work was originally written in 1944. The work underwent many revisions and was finally published in 1950. The original manuscript was withdrawn by Barber in 1964. He ordered that G. Schirmer destroy the original manuscript and all scores in their library. The work remained unpublished for many years until 1984 when a set of parts turned up in a warehouse in England. Renewed interest in Barber's work led to a 1990 reprint of the 1950 edition.
•   
History
Composition
Samuel Barber began his composition career at the age of seven. He was accepted in the presitgious Curtis Institute of Music at age 14. He received critical acclaim for his early compositions including The School for Scandal and Adagio for Strings. His early success led to a commission from the United States Air Force in 1943 to write a "symphonic work about flyers". The request came soon after he joined the United States Army in 1942. Barber spent time at a U.S. Air Force base so that he could take part in flight training and battle simulations.[1] He was given four months to write the piece with the understanding that the army would receive all of the royalties forever.[2]

General Barton K. Yount approached Samuel Barber about the commission and asked him to include "modern devices" in the composition. Barber honored this request by using an electronic tone-generator built by Bell Telephone Laboratories in the second movement. This device was intended to represent the sound of a radio beam used to guide night flyers. The symphony was revised in 1947 to replace the electronic tone-generator with an E-flat clarinet.[3]

Premiere
Symphony No. 2 was premiered on March 3, 1944, by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Serge Koussevitzky conducted the premiere performance at Symphony Hall in Boston, MA.[4]

Revisions
Samuel Barber withdrew the symphony in 1964 and ordered the destruction of the score and parts. His explanation implied to some that his piece was war propaganda. He went on to say, "Times of cataclysm are rarely conducive to the creation of good music, especially when the composer tries to say too much. But the lyrical voice, expressing the dilemma of the individual, may still be of reverence." Barber initially thought that the symphony was one of his finest works. However, after twenty years with infrequent performances, he decided that the symphony was, in his words, "not a good work".[5]

A set of orchestral parts that somehow escaped destruction were found in an English G. Schirmer warehouse in 1984. The parts were returned to New York where they were used for a recording by the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra with Andrew Schenck conducting.[6] A renewed interest in the music of Samuel Barber led to a re-release of Barber's revised second symphony in 1990.[7] Samuel Barber also used material from the second movement of Symphony No. 2 to create the tone poem, Night Flight (1964). The single movement work incorporated themes from the second movement of Symphony No. 2, his opera, Anthony and Cleopatra (1966), and his orchestral work, Fadograph of a Yestern Scene (1971).[8]

Reception
The original release of Barber's Symphony No. 2 was widely criticized for various reasons. Several critics felt that the work was little more than war time propaganda. Many people complained about the inclusion of the electronic tone-generator in a symphonic work. Despite much criticism, the work also received many positive reviews. The work was generally viewed as Barber's most ambitious and contemporary work.[9] There was a great sense of tension and energy in the work that was palpable to audiences.[10]

Analysis
The thematic material of Symphony No. 2 is designed to emulate the sensation of flying. Barber was very clear that he did not view the symphony as program music.[11] However, in his program notes he mentions that the first movement was meant to capture the excitement of flying while the second movement was inspired by his night flights. The final movement begins with very fast string passages with no barlines to express the sensation of flight.[12] Samuel Barber uses tension and release throughout to create a greater sense of energy. His use of ostinatos, polytonality,[13] dissonance, and angular lines create a work that can be described as one of Barber's most progressive works.[14] Barber would later revise the work and state that the symphony has no programmatic intentions.[11]

Movement I
The first movement is in simple triple time and marked allegro ma non troppo. This movement, in sonata form, is the longest movement of the symphony lasting over twelve minutes. The movement opens with aggressive woodwind chords in seconds that move at the interval of a seventh. Then, the strings enter playing the initial theme that is based on the opening chords. Next, a second theme, based around sixteenth notes, leads into a lyrical theme from the oboe, which closes the exposition. The development begins with a contrapuntal passage that leads into a full orchestra statement based on the opening motif. The percussion section is used throughout to create diminution and augmentation of the theme.[15]

Movement II

The second movement is in 5/4 time and marked andante, un poco mosso. The slow movement features solos by the english horn, flute, and E-flat clarinet. The piece, which tries to emulate a flier at night, is based on a slow ostinato 5/4 rhythm that is first played by the muted cellos and basses. The english horn enters over the accompaniment to perform a "lonely" melody in 4/4 time.[12] The juxtaposition of time signatures creates an oscillating rhythmic counterpoint that helps propel the movement forward. The second movement is the shortest movement in the work, lasting around seven minutes.[15] The work was later revised and edited to stand alone as Night Flight, a tone poem for orchestra.[16]

Movement III
The third movement is in fast triple time and marked presto, senza battuta. The third movement is the most technical movement of the entire symphony. The final movement begins with a spiral figure for the strings in free rhythm that is interrupted by the brass section. This leads to a set of variations and a short fugue. The spiral section returns in the brass and also in the coda, which brings the work to an exciting finish. The final movement lasts approximately nine minutes.[17]

Notable recordings
Barber's Symphony No. 2 has been recorded by over a dozen orchestras. A 1951 recording of Symphony No. 2 is available by the New Symphony Orchestra with Samuel Barber conducting. The recording was released by Pavilion Records in 2001.[18] The original recording, performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, is available in Washington, D.C., at the Library of Congress.[19]


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« Reply #92 on: April 28, 2013, 05:38:38 pm »

Music of Adolf Bush


From the collection of Karl Miller

Note: Busch was born in Germany, and fled the fascist government, and ended up in the US.  Therefore I am posting him here.

1. Psalm No 6 for Chorus and Orchestra
Temple University Chorus, Robert Page Cond.
Philadelphia Orchestra
Eugene Ormandy, conductor
April 27, 1958.
Personal recording, not commercially released.

2. Intro
3.  Violin Concerto

Goffried Schneider, violin
Philharmonica Hungarica
Werner Andreas Albert, conductor
Radio broadcast.


Tilly Porter has written a two volume biography of Busch, as weill as the liner notes for a CD compilation of his work that you can view here:
http://www.eclassical.com/shop/art69/SYMP1109.pdf-277322.pdf

Wikipedia Bio:

Adolf Busch

 
 

Adolf Georg Wilhelm Busch (8 August 1891 – 9 June 1952) was a German-born violinist and composer.

Life and career
Busch was born in Siegen in Westphalia. He studied at the Cologne Conservatory with Willy Hess and Bram Eldering. His composition teacher was Fritz Steinbach but he also learned much from his future father-in-law Hugo Grüters in Bonn.

In 1912, Busch founded the Vienna Konzertverein Quartet, consisting of the principals from the Konzertverein orchestra, which made its debut at the 1913 Salzburg Festival. After World War I, he founded the Busch Quartet, which from the 1920–21 season included Gösta Andreasson, violin, Karl Doktor, viola, and Paul Grümmer, cello. The quartet was in existence with varying personnel until 1951.

The additional member of the circle was Rudolf Serkin, who became Busch's duo partner at 18 and eventually married Busch's daughter, Irene. The Busch Quartet and Serkin became the nucleus of the Busch Chamber Players, a forerunner of modern chamber orchestras.

In 1927, with the rise of Adolf Hitler, Busch decided he could not in good conscience stay in Germany, so he emigrated to Basel, Switzerland. (Busch was not Jewish and was popular in Germany, but firmly opposed Nazism from the beginning.) On 1 April 1933 he repudiated Germany altogether and in 1938 he boycotted Italy. On the outbreak of World War II, Busch emigrated from Basel to the United States, where he eventually settled in Vermont. There, he was one of the founders with Rudolf Serkin of the Marlboro Music School and Festival.

The Busch Quartet was particularly admired for its interpretations of Brahms, Schubert, and above all Beethoven. It made a series of recordings in the 1930s that included many of these composers' works for string quartet. In 1941, it set down three Beethoven quartets that it had not previously recorded, including Opus 130. The Busch Quartet never recorded the Grosse Fuge, Opus 133; an arrangement was recorded by the Busch Chamber Players, with Busch leading from the first violin desk.

Busch was a great soloist, as well as a chamber musician, and live recordings exist of him playing the Beethoven, Brahms, Dvorák and Busoni Concertos, as well as the Brahms Double Concerto. In the studio he recorded concertos and chamber orchestra performances of Bach and Mozart, and of the Concerti grossi, op.6 by Handel; his recordings of Bach's Brandenburg Concertos brought them to prominence[1] after many years of relative obscurity. He had a highly individual tone and great technique. Among his students were Stefi Geyer, Erica Morini and Yehudi Menuhin.

As a composer, Busch was influenced by Max Reger. He was among the first to compose a Concerto for Orchestra, in 1929. A number of his compositions have been recorded, including the Violin Concerto (A minor, opus 20, published 1922),[2] String Sextet (G major, opus 40), Quintet for Saxophone and String Quartet, and several large scale works for organ. Regarding the latter, Busch once remarked that if he could come back after his death he would like to return as an organist.

He was the son of the luthier Wilhelm Busch; brother of the conductor Fritz Busch, the cellist Hermann Busch, the pianist Heinrich Busch and the actor Willi Busch, and grandfather of the pianist Peter Serkin. An exhaustive two-volume biography of Busch by Tully Potter was published in 2010 by Toccata Press [3]


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« Reply #93 on: May 03, 2013, 03:28:06 am »

Jeremy Beck:  Sinfonietta for String Orchestra
 


From the collection of Karl Miller




Date,venue, orchestra not known.

Biography at composers site:
http://www.beckmusic.org/biography/


Interesting Essay by Beck and Responses on the current state of composition.
http://beckmusic.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Jeremy-Beck_Anything-Goes-Composition-at-the-Turn-of-the-Century-CMS-Newsletter-Jan-May-1999.pdf
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« Reply #94 on: May 04, 2013, 04:27:09 am »

Easley Blackwood: Symphony No. 2  just downloaded from YouTube.  Szell/Cleveland Orchestra I believe.
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« Reply #95 on: May 04, 2013, 07:44:21 am »

I think it is the premiere. 1960s sound unfortunately.
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jowcol
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« Reply #96 on: May 05, 2013, 01:09:34 am »

Music of John J. Becker


From the collection of Karl Miller

1. Intro with Evelyn Becker
2. Concertino for 2 flutes and Orchestra
3. Outro

University of Cincinnati Philharmonia
Leslie Wiley, Judy Ulbert, flutes
Robert Sader, cond.

4. Introduction
5. Psalm of Love  for Soprano and Piano

Elsa Charlston, sop;,  Andrea Swann, pf.
February, 1976

6. Intro
7.  Soundpiece No. 7 for two pianos
Frina Ashanna and Kenwin Bolt, pianos
8. Outro.


Radio broadcast recordings.



Wikipedia Bio:

John Joseph Becker (b. Henderson, Kentucky, January 22, 1886; d. Wilmette, Illinois, January 21, 1961) was an American composer of contemporary classical music. He is grouped together with Charles Ives, Carl Ruggles, Henry Cowell, and Wallingford Riegger as a member of the "American Five" composers of "ultra-modern" music.

The John J. Becker Papers are held by the Music Division of the New York Public Library.[1] Another collection, the Dr. John J. Becker (1886-1961) Papers, is held at the University of St. Thomas Libraries in Minnesota.[2]



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« Reply #97 on: May 05, 2013, 10:57:58 pm »

More Music of Easley Blackwood:

I ‘m offering up these recordings with an explanation and a caveat.  The original source of these recording were the ones that Karl Miller offered up on Symphony share back in 2010.  At this point, I edited some of the tracks for my mp3 player, and deleted the originals.  Now that rapidshare has deleted the posted files, I am offering up my versions, with the following warnings:

  • I lowered the quality from 192 kps to 128 kps.
  • I likely tweaked the EQ settings to be a bit more garish.  (I do 98% of my listening on ear buds or in the car, so I tend to exaggerate the ends of the spectrum.
  • I’ve increased the volume  in a non-linear way—the low-high range has been narrowed.
  • I’ve joined multiple movements into a single track”
  • I have also likely omitted some tracks.

In short, if Karl’s original versions are posted again, I will remove these, as I don’t want to taint the “gene pool” .  Nonetheless, this may appeal to some of you.  Particularly if your name is BrianA. 

I've included some duplications from my earlier post here-- the two concertos for oboe and flute here are not as trustworthy from this source  as those I've posted previously.

1. Symphony No.4
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Sir George Solti, conductor

2.Symphony No.2
Cleveland Orchestra
George Szell, conductor
[5 January 1961]

3. Concerto for Flute and Strings, Op.23
Robert Willoughby, soloist
"Dartmouth Festival Orchestra
 Mario di Boniventura, conductor
July 28, 1968

4.  Concerto for Oboe and Strings, Op.19

"Dartmouth Festival Orchestra
Mario di Boniventura, conductor
Soloist: Alfred Genovese
Some time between July 15 and 28th, 1968

5. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, Op.24
Blackwood, piano
Cleveland Orchestra
Louis Lane, conductor
[27 April 1972]

6. Symphonic Fantasy
Cleveland Orchestra
George Szell, conductor
[30 September 1966]


All sourced  from personal  recordings or radio broadcasts.  Originally form Karl Miller’s collection, but these are not the definitive releases.



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« Reply #98 on: May 07, 2013, 11:09:08 am »

Migrations (for Narrator and Orchestra) by Mario Abril


Text. By Lin C. Parker
The Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra
Robert Bernhardt, Conductor
Roland Carter, Narrator

Premiere Performance
Tivoli Theatre, Chattanooga, TN
Feb 20, 1997

From the collection of Karl Miller



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BrianA
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« Reply #99 on: May 07, 2013, 05:25:20 pm »

Jowcol, many thanks to you and Mr Miller for your latest installment of Blackwood, for which I have been waiting patiently but with eager anticipation!

Brian
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« Reply #100 on: August 05, 2013, 03:34:51 pm »

I have now fulfilled my repeated promises to upload music by Paul Creston. I've included every work of which I own a legally uploadable recording, including orchestra or large instrumental ensemble. I believe that even hardcore Creston fanatics will find something here that they have never heard before.

Also included in the uploads is a Paul Creston worklist I compiled a few years ago, including ALL his numbered and unnumbered works that I could find out about. The only titles not included in this list are unfinished works. I didn't include movement titles in the downloads listing of the individual recordings. If you consult the worklist, you should be able to find all the detail necessary.

In a project of this magnitude, there will inevitably be some glitches. Please let me know if anything needs to be fixed and I'll endeavor to do so.

Enjoy!
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« Reply #101 on: August 05, 2013, 04:05:07 pm »

Randall Thompson Symphony No. 3, Op. 48 "Three Mysteries" (1950):  BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
  George Lloyd, conductor [live, Dec. 6, 1990]
Fascinated to see this listed, because it confirms that I was actually AT that concert! (At the RNCM???) Over the years I had started to come to the conclusion that I must have imagined/dreamed it, because in retropsect it seems so improbable....(and also because, to be honest, I'd forgotten the music!). I have an idea that David Diamond either conducted/was present at the same concert, though in 2013 that also somehow seems equally unlikely...?
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« Reply #102 on: August 05, 2013, 04:33:08 pm »

Quote
Randall Thompson Symphony No. 3, Op. 48 "Three Mysteries" (1950):  BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
  George Lloyd, conductor [live, Dec. 6, 1990]
Fascinated to see this listed, because it confirms that I was actually AT that concert! (At the RNCM???) Over the years I had started to come to the conclusion that I must have imagined/dreamed it, because in retropsect it seems so improbable....(and also because, to be honest, I'd forgotten the music!). I have an idea that David Diamond either conducted/was present at the same concert, though in 2013 that also somehow seems equally unlikely...?

Randall Thompson?
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« Reply #103 on: August 05, 2013, 05:34:20 pm »

Er...Paul Creston. That's spellcheckers for you! (And like I said, it DOES all seem very vague now...)
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« Reply #104 on: August 07, 2013, 04:53:05 pm »

I have now fulfilled my repeated promises to upload music by Paul Creston. I've included every work of which I own a legally uploadable recording, including orchestra or large instrumental ensemble. I believe that even hardcore Creston fanatics will find something here that they have never heard before.

Also included in the uploads is a Paul Creston worklist I compiled a few years ago, including ALL his numbered and unnumbered works that I could find out about. The only titles not included in this list are unfinished works. I didn't include movement titles in the downloads listing of the individual recordings. If you consult the worklist, you should be able to find all the detail necessary.

In a project of this magnitude, there will inevitably be some glitches. Please let me know if anything needs to be fixed and I'll endeavor to do so.

From Schuylkill88: The soloist in the trombone Fantasy was the then principal of the Philadelphia Orchestra Glenn Dodson.

Enjoy!
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