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British and Irish Music


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Author Topic: British and Irish Music  (Read 34971 times)
Albion
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« Reply #480 on: November 18, 2019, 01:25:18 pm »

If Naxos is savvy (they've already released performances from Wexford festivals) they may have earmarked this for release (perhaps?)...

Besides Much Ado and The Critic I'd also love to hear the earlier The Canterbury Pilgrims (1884). To say that Stanford could not write love duets (as many have said), the act 2 example in The Veiled Prophet sounds like the real thing to me...

 Wink
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #481 on: November 18, 2019, 05:00:45 pm »

Besides the Stanford, there are many operas which I would love to hear complete including Macfarren's She Stoops to Conquer (1864), Arthur Goring Thomas's Esmeralda (1883), Mackenzie's Colomba (1883) and The Cricket on the Hearth (1902), MacCunn's Jeanie Deans (1894) and Boughton's Alkestis (1922). Unfortunately Cowen's Thorgrim (1890) and Harold (1895) are presently hors de combat due to the lack of orchestral scores and parts...

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #482 on: November 18, 2019, 05:15:08 pm »


On a previous post I included the following paragraph:

Perhaps the recent Northern Opera Group's performance of Stanford's Much Ado About Nothing [see: http://www.northernoperagroup.co.uk/much-ado-about-nothing/4594599648 ] might make it to, at least, a privately available CD.  One can only hope. More than a hour of excerpts from this opera (5 in total), from an earlier 2016 performance accompanied by piano, can be accessed from: https://soundcloud.com/northernoperagroup/sets/much-ado-about-nothing-by-charles-villiers-stanford
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #483 on: March 26, 2020, 09:50:53 pm »

Just to let interested members know that the British and Irish Music Archive is still alive and well and welcomes any relevant non-commercial broadcast recordings in good sound that you may think fit for preservation. In the meantime, I wish all members well and, above all, stay safe and enjoy the great resources that technology now affords us...

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #484 on: March 27, 2020, 01:19:21 pm »

I can thoroughly recommend the Northern Opera Much Ado. Only piano accompaniment but magnificent. I hope we can expect a full recording of the work one day. Jeanie Deans of course exists in substantial extracts on Hyperion. I would love to hear some Goring Thomas or Mackenzie operas though.
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #485 on: March 28, 2020, 10:50:50 pm »

I can thoroughly recommend the Northern Opera Much Ado. Only piano accompaniment but magnificent. I hope we can expect a full recording of the work one day. Jeanie Deans of course exists in substantial extracts on Hyperion. I would love to hear some Goring Thomas or Mackenzie operas though.

On a previous post I included the following paragraph:

Perhaps the recent Northern Opera Group's performance of Stanford's Much Ado About Nothing [see: http://www.northernoperagroup.co.uk/much-ado-about-nothing/4594599648 ] might make it to, at least, a privately available CD.  One can only hope. More than a hour of excerpts from this opera (5 in total), from an earlier 2016 performance accompanied by piano, can be accessed from: https://soundcloud.com/northernoperagroup/sets/much-ado-about-nothing-by-charles-villiers-stanford

Many thanks for alerting me and hopefully many others to these extracts from an excellent performance. Although without orchestra it is a rare privilege to hear such skill and commitment dedicated to neglected British opera. I would also echo the wish for some Mackenzie (especially Colomba, 1883, and The Cricket on the Hearth, 1901) and Goring Thomas' Esmeralda, 1883. Excellent!

 Grin
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #486 on: March 31, 2020, 02:23:48 am »

The Joubert Requiem, - great.  Thank you.  Before I get to the piece myself, how would you evaluate it?
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« Reply #487 on: March 31, 2020, 11:42:07 am »

The Joubert Requiem, - great.  Thank you.  Before I get to the piece myself, how would you evaluate it?

Greg, I am sorry, I haven‘t listened to the requiem myself yet.
I did upload this recent BBC broadcast just because Joubert is one of the better known composers of his generation and held in high esteem by members of this board. We have some of his works in Albion‘s archive but not this one yet.

My first acquaintance with Joubert was via a BBC broadcast of the first symphony. The dramatic thrust impressed me but I couldn‘t quite figure out wether Joubert‘s music had a strong enough personality on its own. The piece still convinces me though.
In his later music there is a tendency to rely too much on sequence. This is especially annoying in his songs. (A CD was released by Toccata Classics.) Sequencing a phrase is a technique to emphasize a statement. However, by making too much use of it the good intention is in danger to become thwarted.
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« Reply #488 on: March 31, 2020, 03:39:48 pm »

The Joubert Requiem, - great.  Thank you.  Before I get to the piece myself, how would you evaluate it?

I loved it.  Very RVW to me.  It's lovely, lyrical, concise (around 45 minutes) and dramatic.
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #489 on: April 10, 2020, 10:59:07 am »

There is an mp3 in the archive of yesterday's BBC broadcast of Cipriani Potter's Symphony No.1 in G minor (1819-26) given by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Howard Griffiths. Seven of Potter's nine extant symphonies can now be heard in either commercial recordings or non-commercial BBC broadcasts:

a. commercial recordings

F major (1826), E flat major (1828), G minor (1832) - the first on Classico (2005), the latter two on Unicorn-Kanchana (1989)

b. BBC broadcasts

G minor (1819/ 26), C minor (1826), C minor (1834), D major (1834) [those in F major (1826), E flat major (1828) and G minor (1832) were also broadcast in 1995]


leaving those in B flat major (1821) and D major (1833) unrecorded.

The best readily available sources for information on Potter's symphonies remain A. Peter Brown's The Symphonic Repertoire Volume III Part B (2008) and Jurgen Schaarwachter's Two Centuries of British Symphonism: From the beginnings to 1945 Volume I (2015).
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #490 on: April 13, 2020, 10:31:28 am »

The many items "recently" donated by generous members are now in the archive and the catalogue is up to date again: these include broadcasts of works by Sally Beamish, James MacMillan, Huw Watkins, James Dillon and John Joubert. Many thanks.

Please could members with an interest keep an eye on the radio listings for anything of import. Afternoon on 3 is often a happy hunting ground...

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #491 on: November 11, 2020, 11:20:33 am »

Sicmu has placed the following download on the British and Irish Music board:

Robin Milford - Symphony No.2, Op.34 (1933) BBC Concert Orchestra conducted by Martin Yates

in a performance from the 2019 English Music Festival.

Many thanks!

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #492 on: January 30, 2021, 11:08:38 am »

Hi PJ. Many thanks for supplying the recording of Susan Spain-Dunk's The Farmer's Boy Overture. I'll pop a copy in the archive as well.

 Smiley

I must apologise - I got a message saying the upload wasn't activated. I've now done so and it can be downloaded.

https://www.mediafire.com/file/qjkskjgblyqup3l/Spain-Dunk.zip/file

P
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #493 on: February 06, 2021, 12:39:29 am »

Please could members let me know of any composers listed who are sadly no longer with us (several were born in the 1920s and 1930s)

Well, it comes to us all...




Alas, several of the composers included in the archive have left us since I last properly maintained the catalogue, which I have now amended:

2012 - Gareth Walters
2013 - Stephen Dodgson, John Tavener
2014 - Arthur Butterworth, Antony Hopkins, Patric Standford
2015 - Mervyn Burtch, John McCabe, Ronald Stevenson, Ernest Tomlinson
2016 - Peter Maxwell Davies
2017 - Derek Bourgeois, John Maxwell Geddes, Malcolm Lipkin
2018 - Donald Hunt
2019 - Herbert Chappell, Anthony Hedges
2020 - Gerard Schurmann


but the good news is that Francis Jackson is still with us at the age of 103, and that the music of the composers listed above can still be heard...

 Smiley
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #494 on: February 06, 2021, 01:16:38 pm »

Britannia at the Opera

I have finally got round to sorting out these broadcasts from the wonderful 1995 BBC Radio 3 series which presented excerpts from the following:

1. William Vincent Wallace - Maritana (1845)*
2. Edward Loder - Raymond and Agnes (1855)
3. Julius Benedict - The Lily of Killarney (1862)
4. Arthur Sullivan - Ivanhoe (1891)*
5. Hamish MacCunn - Jeanie Deans (1894)*
6. Charles Villiers Stanford - The Travelling Companion (1916)
7. Cyril Scott - The Alchemist (1917)
8. Joseph Holbrooke - Bronwen (1920)
9. Arthur Bliss - The Olympians (1948)
10. Arthur Benjamin - A Tale of Two Cities (1950)


All of these are now presented as single files as opposed to split items as previously and those marked * include the original narration by Roderick Dunnett.

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

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