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British and Irish Music


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Author Topic: British and Irish Music  (Read 35288 times)
BrianA
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« Reply #330 on: September 24, 2014, 03:47:29 am »

I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this question and if not I will cheerfully accept appropriate correction, but I have been listening to Samuel Sebastian Wesley's Symphony in C of ca.1834 as downloaded from the British And Irish music archive herein, a bit more than 11 minutes of unbroken music, all told.  But to my admittedly crude and untutored ear it sounds more like an opening movement from a longer multi-movement work than a self-contained symphony.  Can anybody better informed than I am tell me (a) am I right, or were British composers actually composing single movement symphonies in the 1830s, and (b) if by some chance I am right, is there an extant performance of the complete work somewhere?

Many thanks!

Brian
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Albion
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« Reply #331 on: September 24, 2014, 08:32:34 am »

Hi Brian. Yes, unusually for the period it is a single-movement symphony (or sinfonia) and was for a long time wrongly attributed to the elder Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
BrianA
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« Reply #332 on: September 25, 2014, 03:11:32 am »

Many thanks, Albion!  Since posting my question I also discovered at least one online source that suggests the existing single movement may have been intended as the first movement of a projected multi-movement symphony.  Be that as it may, I have the answer I was looking for, namely that the single movement available in the archive is indeed the symphony as it exists.

Brian
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« Reply #333 on: December 01, 2014, 03:33:34 pm »

The following works by Joseph Holbrooke (1878-1958) are now in the archive:

Violin Concerto, The Grasshopper, Op.59 (1909, rev. 1916, 1928)

Auld Lang Syne Variations, Op.60 (1904, rev. c.1918)


and will remain there until the CPO CD release (also to include The Raven, Op.25)

 Smiley

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
jowcol
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« Reply #334 on: February 10, 2015, 08:43:18 pm »

Music of Robin Orr


From the collection  of Karl Miller



Symphony in One Movement (No. 1- 1963)
Scottish National Orchestra
Alexander Gibson, conductor
EMI ASD 2279


Symphony No. 2 (1970)
BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Christopher Seeman, conductor
Usher Hall, Edinburgh
[May 10 1971]


Symphony No. 3 (1978)
BBC Welsh Symphony Orchestra
Norman del Mar, Conductor
Llandaff Cathedral
[14 June 1978]


Notes: 
Description of Symphony 1 by Tony Haywood:
The Robin Orr Symphony is also in a single movement, and also reminiscent of Sibelius, though the Sibelius of nature. It is the shortest of the three, and is a tightly controlled, concisely argued work. The melodic material does not have as much sheer personality as Sibelius, but is an attractive, well-orchestrated piece. Bird-like woodwind cries, horn calls and flashes of trumpet fanfare intersperse the rather sombre, brooding material (originally conceived as incidental music for a Cambridge production of Sophocles’ Oedipus). The Symphony was originally championed by Norman del Mar and the BBC Scottish Orchestra and notched up a number of performances.



Biography from:
http://www.scottishmusiccentre.com


Robin Orr was born in Scotland in 1909 where he lived until he was 25. After studying at the Royal College of Music, at Cambridge University (Organ Scholar at Pembroke College) and with Casella (in Italy) and Nadia Boulanger (in France), he moved to Cambridge, where he has spent most of his professional life. He was Organist and Director of Music at St John's College from 1938 to 1951, interrupted by war service in the RAFVR. From 1947 to 1956 he held a University Lectureship and was also a professor at the RCM. The next nine years were spent in Glasgow where he was the first full-time Professor of Music at the University and became the first Chairman of Scottish Opera, an appointment he held for 15 years. He was Professor of Music at Cambridge from 1965 to 1976 (now Emeritus). During that time he made himself responsible for the new Music Faculty buildings, including raising the necessary funds for a first-class concert hall. For many years he was a Trustee of the Carl Rosa Opera and was a director of Welsh National Opera from 1977 to 1982. He is a Mus. D. of Cambridge, an Honorary Fellow of St John's and Pembroke Colleges, Hon. Mus. D. of Glasgow and LLD of Dundee, and was made CBE in 1972. Since retirement from academic work, he spent much time with his wife in her native Switzerland. He was given Swiss nationality in 1995 and became a member of the Association Suisse des Musiciens in 1997.

Robin Orr's compositions include three commissioned operas: Full Circle (by Scottish Television for Scottish Opera in 1967, followed by four other separate productions); Hermiston (by Scottish Opera for the Edinburgh Festival in 1975); and On the Razzle (by the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in 1988). He has also written three symphonies that attracted the devoted support of Sir Alexander Gibson and Norman del Mar. The first, In One Movement, has been performed at the Edinburgh International Festival, the London BBC Proms and more than 60 other events worldwide; it was also recorded by HMV. The third, commissioned for the Llandaff Festival in 1978, was taken up in Scotland and had an English première in Cambridge conducted by Stephen Cleobury. The Sinfonietta Helvetica (BBC commission) was premièred in Glasgow (1991), recognising the 700th anniversary of the founding of the Swiss Confederation. Orr has written several works for voice and strings: From the Book of Philip Sparrow (Janet Baker with the SNO 1969 and ECO, 1971) and Journeys and Places (the University of Glasgow, 1971) performed in Cambridge in 1984 by Sally Burgess and the Endellion String Quartet with Chi-Chi-Nwanoku. The Endellion (with tenor and oboe) performed Four Romantic Songs (commissioned by Peter Pears in 1949).

Chamber and church music are an important part of his creative work. Songs of Zion (on texts from four of the Psalms) was commissioned for the St Asaph Festival in 1978 and first performed by Stephen Wilkinson with the BBC Northern Singers. It was performed at the Zurich June Festival in 1986 and subsequently recorded for Nimbus by George Guest and St John's College Choir. There have been a number of performances in Switzerland of the Rhapsody for Strings (1956), most notably by the Zurcher Kammerorchester and the Camerata Bern; the Rhapsody has also been performed many times in Britain, by the ECO, SNO and the City of London Sinfonia. In 1998 Robin's autobiography Musical Chairs was published by Thames Publishing. His latest work is a commission from the BBC for a piece to precede the Monteverdi Vespers, with the BBC Singers under Stephen Cleobury, premièred in Kings College Chapel on 6th August, 1999 and recorded as part of the Sounding the Millennium.


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All download links I have posted are for works, that, to  my knowledge, have never been commercially released in digital form.  Should you find I've been in error, please notify myself or an Administrator.  Please IM me if I've made any errors that require attention, as I may not read replies.
Dundonnell
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« Reply #335 on: March 04, 2015, 12:14:42 am »

The complete Daniel Jones massive Oratorio "St. Peter" !! Smiley Smiley Smiley

Thank you, thank you, Holger Smiley

My incomplete version can now be binned. Not in my wildest dreams etc etc etc......... Grin
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #336 on: March 15, 2015, 12:46:41 am »

Thanks to northern for the additions of the Priaulx Rainier Violin Concerto and the William Sweeney "Sunset Song".

Good to hear the late Sir Alexander Gibson with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra from the late 80s-albeit in a piece I find somewhat anonymous.

The Rainier Violin Concerto is, I am afraid, beyond me. I know that a number of performers and conductors found her music very difficult and I can understand why.

However-and this is important-without uploads of this kind we are unlikely to get the opportunity to exercise our judgment and such judgments will differ from one listener to another.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #337 on: April 13, 2015, 02:05:40 pm »

Just to draw attention to the need to update the Catalogue to reflect jowcol's addition of a second recording of the

Robin Orr Symphony No.2: BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra/Christopher Seaman (May 10 1971)

and the need to delete the recording of

John McCabe Symphony No.1 "Elegy": London Philharmonic Orchestra/John Snashall

which has recently been re-released on a Naxos cd
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fr8nks
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« Reply #338 on: April 19, 2015, 10:10:16 pm »

Many thanks to calyptorhynchus for David Matthews' Symphony No.8. I am just now getting a chance to listen to it and find it most enjoyable. Good job on both the recording and the sound.
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tapiola
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« Reply #339 on: April 19, 2015, 11:18:06 pm »

Indeed!  A marvelous symphony.  Thank you again calyptorhynchus!
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Albion
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« Reply #340 on: April 20, 2015, 10:11:07 am »

Just to draw attention to the need to update the Catalogue to reflect jowcol's addition of a second recording of the

Robin Orr Symphony No.2: BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra/Christopher Seaman (May 10 1971)

and the need to delete the recording of

John McCabe Symphony No.1 "Elegy": London Philharmonic Orchestra/John Snashall

which has recently been re-released on a Naxos cd

Many thanks to calyptorhynchus for David Matthews' Symphony No.8. I am just now getting a chance to listen to it and find it most enjoyable. Good job on both the recording and the sound.


Thanks Colin and calyptorhynchus.

I have added the Orr and Matthews Symphonies files to the archive, deleted the McCabe file and updated the catalogue to reflect these changes.

 Smiley
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #341 on: May 11, 2015, 10:03:30 am »

Many thanks for the addition of the Reizenstein Concerto for String Orchestra-at 24 minutes a substantial piece Smiley

I am, by the way, well aware of my lack of consistency in placing composers invariably in the country of their birth. I have treated both Hans Gal and Ego Wellesz as Austrian composers "in exile" but have decided that Reizenstein has become British by adoption. My only excuse is that both Egon Wellesz and Hans Gal were established figures in Austrian and German music in 1938 when they fled to the UK. Wellesz was 53 and Gal 48. Reizenstein on the other hand emigrated to the UK in 1934 at the age of 23 and made his entire career in Great Britain.
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Albion
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« Reply #342 on: May 12, 2015, 10:35:44 am »

The Reizenstein Concerto for  Strings has been added to the archive and catalogue.

 Smiley
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tapiola
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« Reply #343 on: May 12, 2015, 11:57:29 am »

Where does Seiber fit best?
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #344 on: May 12, 2015, 03:16:45 pm »

Where does Seiber fit best?

Seiber left Hungary in 1933 aged 28, settled in Britain and took British citizenship. All of his orchestral music was written after he came to the UK. Therefore-by my own self-decided criterion-Seiber is British Smiley  Nimbus clearly disagree since their recent release of three pieces for cello and orchestra, including Seiber's 'Tre pezzi', is under the heading of "Hungarian Concertos".
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