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British and Irish Music


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Author Topic: British and Irish Music  (Read 37288 times)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #585 on: September 16, 2021, 02:31:19 pm »

Even in the best-regulated families (or on the best-moderated forums, it seems).  Cheesy

Go on, smile for the camera...



...say "Gruyère". Oh, just don't bother.

BAH!!!

 Grin When you see things like that it makes you wonder how come photography 'took off', doesn't it?

Indeed, it's family-friendly fun, fun, fun all round. Worra bloody miserable lot, eh? Couldn't raise a laugh if y'applied Ken Dodd's ticklin' stick (oo-er, missus).

 Cheesy

British and Irish Music?



Mere idling methinks.
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #586 on: September 16, 2021, 02:41:44 pm »

Even in the best-regulated families (or on the best-moderated forums, it seems).  Cheesy

Go on, smile for the camera...



...say "Gruyère". Oh, just don't bother.

BAH!!!

 Grin When you see things like that it makes you wonder how come photography 'took off', doesn't it?

Indeed, it's family-friendly fun, fun, fun all round. Worra bloody miserable lot, eh? Couldn't raise a laugh if y'applied Ken Dodd's ticklin' stick (oo-er, missus).

Mere idling methinks.

Maybe someone should have broken out the nitrous oxide.  Wink


British and Irish Music?

Mere idling methinks.

Well, the step-father of Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was a railway worker, so we're not really off track!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #587 on: September 16, 2021, 02:50:48 pm »

Well, the step-father of Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was a railway worker, so we're not really off track!

By the sainted fillet of St Margaret of Antioch...



...mayo or tartar optional.
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #588 on: September 16, 2021, 03:37:21 pm »

Well, the step-father of Samuel Coleridge-Taylor was a railway worker, so we're not really off track!

By the sainted fillet of St Margaret of Antioch...



...mayo or tartar optional.

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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #589 on: September 16, 2021, 03:56:32 pm »

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #590 on: September 16, 2021, 04:27:55 pm »



No.  Cheesy
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #591 on: September 16, 2021, 04:45:35 pm »

No.  Cheesy

Somehow, I suspected as much.

 Wink
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #592 on: September 16, 2021, 05:43:32 pm »


You can call me a cynic if you like.  Wink
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #593 on: September 17, 2021, 01:40:58 am »

I have added an MP3 to BIMA of

Frederic Cliffe (1857-1931)

Symphony No.1 in C minor, Op.1 (1889)
AOIDE SO/ Gerd Müller-Lorenz (31/10/2019)


A wonderful score and an excellent performance. The acoustic is preferable to the swimming-bath Sterling CD recording.

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #594 on: September 17, 2021, 09:38:56 am »

I have added an MP3 to BIMA of

Frederic Cliffe (1857-1931)

Symphony No.1 in C minor, Op.1 (1889)
AOIDE SO/ Gerd Müller-Lorenz (31/10/2019)


A wonderful score and an excellent performance. The acoustic is preferable to the swimming-bath Sterling CD recording.

 Smiley

Thank you very much, John. I can't understand why anybody found the venue in which the Stirling CD was recorded was actually suitable for recording, or why the producer and engineer didn't try to tame the reverberation in some way. It's verging on the absurd. I shall look forward to hearing this version.
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #595 on: September 17, 2021, 09:52:50 am »

I have added an MP3 to BIMA of

Frederic Cliffe (1857-1931)

Symphony No.1 in C minor, Op.1 (1889)
AOIDE SO/ Gerd Müller-Lorenz (31/10/2019)


A wonderful score and an excellent performance. The acoustic is preferable to the swimming-bath Sterling CD recording.

 Smiley

Thank you very much, John. I can't understand why anybody found the venue in which the Sterling CD was recorded was actually suitable for recording, or why the producer and engineer didn't try to tame the reverberation in some way. It's verging on the absurd. I shall look forward to hearing this version.

Obviously St Johannes Church in Malmo is one to avoid.

 Tongue
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #596 on: September 17, 2021, 10:18:25 am »

I have added an MP3 to BIMA of

Frederic Cliffe (1857-1931)

Symphony No.1 in C minor, Op.1 (1889)
AOIDE SO/ Gerd Müller-Lorenz (31/10/2019)


A wonderful score and an excellent performance. The acoustic is preferable to the swimming-bath Sterling CD recording.

 Smiley

Thank you very much, John. I can't understand why anybody found the venue in which the Sterling CD was recorded was actually suitable for recording, or why the producer and engineer didn't try to tame the reverberation in some way. It's verging on the absurd. I shall look forward to hearing this version.

Obviously St Johannes Church in Malmo is one to avoid.

 Tongue

Oh, so that's where it was recorded. I do have the CD but with my bad back I couldn't be bothered to clamber over a piano and a television to retrieve it from the shelf!  Grin
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #597 on: September 17, 2021, 04:46:44 pm »

I have added an MP3 to BIMA of

Frederic Cliffe (1857-1931)

Symphony No.1 in C minor, Op.1 (1889)
AOIDE SO/ Gerd Müller-Lorenz (31/10/2019)


A wonderful score and an excellent performance. The acoustic is preferable to the swimming-bath Sterling CD recording.

 Smiley

Thank you very much, John. I can't understand why anybody found the venue in which the Sterling CD was recorded was actually suitable for recording, or why the producer and engineer didn't try to tame the reverberation in some way. It's verging on the absurd. I shall look forward to hearing this version.

Obviously St Johannes Church in Malmo is one to avoid.

 Tongue

Oh, so that's where it was recorded. I do have the CD but with my bad back I couldn't be bothered to clamber over a piano and a television to retrieve it from the shelf!  Grin



First violins, use a little more bow please! Don't mind the gurgling tuba in the background.

 Roll Eyes
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #598 on: September 17, 2021, 05:08:00 pm »




First violins, use a little more bow please! Don't mind the gurgling tuba in the background.

 Roll Eyes

Ah, wonderful! The Esther Williams Aquatic Symphony Orchestra in rehearsal...
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calyptorhynchus
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« Reply #599 on: September 20, 2021, 11:54:31 pm »

I have uploaded a link to my MIDI transcription of Simpson's Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano to Downloads.

This work was written in 1967, the year before the well-known Quintet for Clarinet and Strings. It is completely different from that work, although like the later work it has enormous energy and passages of serious beauty.

When I was transcribing it I listened to it section by section as I completed each section and I interpreted it as a work of extreme musical energy like the Symphony No.5. However on listening to it all the way through I revised my opinion, because I had missed the fun and good humour of the piece. In my interpretation now the work is a sort of written-down improvisation between the piano on the one hand and the clarinet in A and cello on the other. I say this because the clarinet and cello usually play together in unison or close imitation (the cello often playing high in its register) whereas the piano part is more different in its material. I imagined Simpson imagining a clarinettist and a cellist who are very good friends and understand each other very well meeting up for the first time with a pianist who is a little more jazzy and outgoing than they are and the Trio is the result of their first improvisations together.

The piece begins with a slow, mysterious introduction in Eflat minor, where it sounds as though the players are testing their tuning. Suddenly an Allegro non troppo section begins led by the piano. The first stretch of fast music is a little bit tentative and is full of figurations that are played with and then quickly dropped. The music isn’t particularly dissonant, but it is modulating constantly (Simpson, as usual, uses no key signatures, and every bar is full of accidentals, throughout the piece).

Quite soon the music drops away in volume and tempo and a slower section ♩= 72 begins. This is seriously beautiful, but doesn’t last long, almost as though the musicians have suddenly discovered the profundity of their music-making and are a little embarrassed about it. It fades away, there is a pause, and then an Allegro molto e furioso section begins. This is faster than the first fast section and two-in-a-bar, not triple time. Its energy is incredible (in some bars every note has an accent and sfs and sffs abound). But I don’t hear any anger (despite the furioso) or angst, perhaps occasionally the clarinet sounds a little irritated with the piano, and the cello sounds as if it is straining to keep up, high on the fingerboard.

The music again is full of figurations and patterns that are tried out and then dropped, and picked up again at a later stage in different combinations. There are quieter passages, but the music carries on and on (this last section is in fact the same length as the first fast section but has more notes and sounds more substantial) until quite suddenly the players seem to realise that it’s time to stop. The music just seems to end mid-flow, with a quick concluding few bars where the clarinet plays a sustained f# fading to niente, seemingly the note where proceedings had got up to, but the pianist (remembering they began in Eflat minor) realises that the clarinet note can be reinterpreted as a gflat and so plays a quiet chord of Eflat minor to round the session off.

00.00 Largo Molto
00.54 Allegro non troppo
08.55 ♩= 72
14.08 Allegro molto e furioso (tt 22.00)

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