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British and Irish Music


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Author Topic: British and Irish Music  (Read 34544 times)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #495 on: February 12, 2021, 08:39:10 am »

Thanks to the generosity of Latvian the following broadcasts of music by Arnold Bax (1883-1953) are now in the archive:

Roscatha (1910)++++
Kensington SO/ Leslie Head (br. 1977)

Spring Fire (1913)++++
BBC SO/ Norman Del Mar (br. 8/10/1983)

Sinfonietta (1932)++++
BBC Welsh O/ Vernon Handley (br. 23/12/1983)

Cello Concerto (1932)++++
William Pleeth, cello/ BBC SO/ Maurice Miles

Symphony No.5 (1932)++++
BBC Northern O/ Maurice Handford (br. 15/5/1967)

Symphony No.6 (1935)++++
New Philharmonia O/ Stanford Robinson (br. 11/9/1967)

Overture to Adventure (1936)++++
BBC CO/ Vernon Handley (br. 10/11/1970)

London Pageant (1937)++++
LPO/ Vernon Handley (br. 14/11/1983)

Coronation March (1953)++++
BBC SO/ Basil Cameron (br. 19/9/1953)


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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #496 on: February 12, 2021, 01:02:00 pm »

Excellent! A treasure trove,indeed! Thank you,Latvian (and Albion!) Smiley
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #497 on: February 13, 2021, 09:05:26 am »

I have uploaded the thirteen excellent interval talks by David Mackie which were broadcast as an integral part of the 1989 BBC series of the complete Gilbert and Sullivan operas.

They have been combined into a single mp3 file.

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #498 on: February 13, 2021, 08:36:59 pm »

After much dithering I have finally completed work on the 1973 broadcast of Havergal Brian's one-act opera Agamemnon (1957).



Over the years I have received three separate transcriptions from Dundonnel, MVS and Latvian (thanks to all), each quite different: one contained the introductory announcement with Malcolm MacDonald's detailed description, one contained the introductory announcement without it, one contained the closing credits, one was mono, one was stereo, one was low in volume, one was higher in volume, etc.

I have now done as much as I can to integrate these three sets of files into one presentation, editing out blips and trying to match up the volume as best I can. Hopefully it's acceptable until a more professional product comes along...

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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #499 on: February 14, 2021, 05:23:01 pm »

Although the thirteen wonderful Havergal Brian part-songs were already in the archive (donated by Latvian), his recent post has prompted me to do something practical with them: these are all now in a single mp3 file entitled Brian - Part-songs (1905-1925) presented in the same sequence as the original BMS cassette.

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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« Reply #500 on: February 15, 2021, 01:57:55 am »

Oops! I couldn't remember whether I had uploaded them previously and they didn't turn up in a quick search...

Anyway, I hope they prove enjoyable!
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #501 on: February 15, 2021, 06:51:22 am »

Oops! I couldn't remember whether I had uploaded them previously and they didn't turn up in a quick search...

Anyway, I hope they prove enjoyable!

They're fantastic, and well-performed in the recording.

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #502 on: February 15, 2021, 09:25:29 am »

In 2013, the Proms unexpectedly gave some long-overdue prominence to Granville Bantock (1868-1946) with five performances - not even a significant anniversary (unless 145 counts for something). I was able to attend the Jurowski and Oramo concerts.

 Wink

I've finally got round to completing and uploading the set of broadcasts with the gorgeous comedy overture, The Pierrot of the Minute...

The Witch of Atlas (1902)
LPO/ Vladimir Jurowski (br. 30/8/2013)

Sapphic Poem (1906)
Raphael Wallfisch, cello/ BBC NOW/ Jac van Steen (br. 24/7/2013)

The Pierrot of the Minute, comedy overture (1908)
BBC CO/ Barry Wordsworth (br. 31/7/2013)

Hamabdil (1919)
Raphael Wallfisch, cello/ BBC NOW/ Jac van Steen (br. 24/7/2013)

Celtic Symphony (1940)
BBC SO/ Sakari Oramo (br. 21/8/2013)


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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #503 on: February 16, 2021, 06:04:24 am »

Since its establishment on 17th December 2010, the archive has now served 104,642 downloads...



...please increase this rather modest number by exploring!

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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #504 on: February 16, 2021, 08:45:18 am »

Thank you Latvian for donating this important broadcast to the archive:

Parry - Job (1892)
Lesley Rooke, sop (Shepherd Boy); John Michinson, ten (Satan); John Carol Case, bar (Job); Benjamin Luxon, bar (Narrator)
BBC Northern Singers/ BBC Northern SO/ Adrian Boult
(br. 29/12/1967)


This wonderful performance conducted by one of Parry's staunchest advocates makes a far stronger case for the work than does the somewhat anaemic Hyperion recording: it gives greater credibility to Job's contemporary popularity. I much prefer a soprano in the role of the Shepherd Boy as in this performance to the treble used by Hyperion (Parry marked it soprano in the score). Adrian Boult (1889-1983) knew Parry personally and his interpretation is informed by a life-time devoted to British music.

I have done the work on this and edited out 21 seconds of blank gaps between what must have originally been tape change-overs to re-create the seamless structure intended by Parry.

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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #505 on: February 17, 2021, 03:08:41 pm »

I have finally got round to five interesting works generously uploaded some time ago by Latvian:

Lloyd Moore (b.1968)
Diabolus in Musica (2007)

Michael Langemann (b.1983)
Five Movements for Orchestra (2010)

Ian Vine (b. 1974)
Violet (2001)
Alazarin Sun (2006)

Gavin Higgins (b. 1983)
Dancing at the Edge of Hell (2010)

BBC Symphony Orchestra
Andre de Ridder, conductor [live, Mar. 30, 2010]


As usual, I have converted the files from FLAC to MP3 (192kbps) and I hope that this will encourage members to have a listen.

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #506 on: February 17, 2021, 10:24:11 pm »

I have been working on improving the quality of my recordings of

Stanford - Te Deum, Op.66 (1898)

Coleridge-Taylor - Five Choral Ballads, Op.54 (1904-05)


and reduced the original FM hiss.

With all such tinkering, it's swings and roundabouts - some things you gain, some things you lose. To think, I used to spend hours doing this sort of thing with Dundonnel...

 Roll Eyes

Anyway, the newer versions are now in the archive, and hopefully may at least suffice until better transcriptions come along - I surely can't have been the only person in the world who recorded the Stanford on Boxing Day 1999...

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #507 on: February 17, 2021, 11:22:15 pm »

I have been working on improving the quality of my recordings of

Stanford - Te Deum, Op.66 (1898)

Coleridge-Taylor - Five Choral Ballads, Op.54 (1904-05)


and reduced the original FM hiss.

With all such tinkering, it's swings and roundabouts - some things you gain, some things you lose. To think, I used to spend hours doing this sort of thing with Dundonnel...

 Roll Eyes

Anyway, the newer versions are now in the archive, and hopefully may at least suffice until better transcriptions come along - I surely can't have been the only person in the world who recorded the Stanford on Boxing Day 1999...

 Smiley

Thank you,John. As out Aussie cousins say, "Yer blood's worth bottling!"

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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #508 on: February 18, 2021, 12:06:55 am »

I have been working on improving the quality of my recordings of

Stanford - Te Deum, Op.66 (1898)

Coleridge-Taylor - Five Choral Ballads, Op.54 (1904-05)


and reduced the original FM hiss.

With all such tinkering, it's swings and roundabouts - some things you gain, some things you lose. To think, I used to spend hours doing this sort of thing with Dundonnel...

 Roll Eyes

Anyway, the newer versions are now in the archive, and hopefully may at least suffice until better transcriptions come along - I surely can't have been the only person in the world who recorded the Stanford on Boxing Day 1999...

 Smiley

Thank you,John. As out Aussie cousins say, "Yer blood's worth bottling!"

 Grin

Cheers, Lionel. I hope you like the results! I was on my feet at the end of the Stanford at Leeds Town Hall back in November 1999, as were many others. I had three friends singing in the Leeds Philharmonic Chorus (they didn't much like Harry Christophers, but I think he did a pretty decent job in repertoire which was way-outside his comfort zone)...

 Grin

Unfortunately, when dealing with FM hiss the thing that suffers most loss is the strings because of the similarity in frequency - in general vocal contributions and brass are pretty much unaffected...

 Smiley
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #509 on: February 19, 2021, 06:30:10 am »

Just added:

Hoddinott - Lizard, Concerto for Orchestra, Op.181 (2003)
BBC NOW/ Jac van Steen (24/1/2009, br. 18/2/2021)


This is from the second concert given at the newly-opened Hoddinott Hall in Cardiff.

"More poetry with Alun Hoddinott’s Lizard, of 2003. In 1995 Hoddinott wrote a set of four songs under the title Tymhorau (Seasons), setting texts by Gwyn Thomas, accomplished poet in both languages of Wales. The text he set for summer, was Thomas’s heat-filled poem which observes and evokes the sudden movements (and equally sudden stillnesses) of a lizard seen, in fierce sunlight, upon an ancient wall in Provence. Responding to a later commission from the BBC National Orchestra of Wales (in 2003), Hoddinott produced an extended (the piece lasts almost thirty minutes) orchestral response to the same poem. It would be wrong to think of the piece as straightforwardly programmatic – apart from anything else the twenty one short lines of Thomas’s poem alone would hardly fuel a piece of such length. But Hoddinott has clearly responded both to the poem’s contrast between suddenness and stillness and to Thomas’s use of musical metaphor within his text:

            It’s a lizard
            Come out
            To warm its blood in the sun.
            Small, mottled, stock-still
            With skin like tissue paper
            Respirating energy.
            Then a pizzicato
            Across the wall, across its sunlight:
            Another stop,
            Respires again.
            Then cranks on
            As in an old film.


Hoddinott’s score alternates faster and slower sections, in a relatively loose A-B-A-B-A structure and is built around two essential motifs, a pattern of triplets which ascends to a motif of fast repeated notes and, on the other hand, a group of five rhythmically pronounced semiquavers. At times one can ‘hear’ images from Thomas’s poem very clearly: some of the orchestral textures seeming to evoke, with some vividness the sensory juxtapositions of “sunlight, a lizard, a wall / An old, old wall” and some of the changes of tempo evocative of the abruptness of the lizard’s stoppings and startings. At other times, Hoddinott seems more concerned to explore the purely musical possibilities of his material, and the references to Thomas’s poem seem to (largely) disappear. The explicitly programmatic and the more ‘abstract’ elements aren’t perhaps always fully integrated, but this is certainly a very accomplished score and van Steen and his orchestra were certainly persuasive advocates for it, responsive to Hoddinott’s vivid contrasts of colour and sonority." (Seen and Heard International, Musicweb, January 2009)
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