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A party game for the Christmas season


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Author Topic: A party game for the Christmas season  (Read 2138 times)
Gauk
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« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2015, 09:03:50 am »

Many symphonies have a part for organ without being concertante roles, and I think the snare drum in Nielsen 5 is no more significant than the two sets of timps in Nielsen 4. So delete Nielsen and Khachacturian, and there really is a defined common thread - to which of course some of the others mentioned like Prokofiev could be added.
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northern
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« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2015, 11:06:07 am »

Not sure what you want to do with Panufnik's fourth Symphony (sinfonia concertante) for flute harp and small string orchestra and seventh 'Metasinfonia', for organ timpani and strings.
Leon Orthel's Symphony No.4 for Piano and Orch. is a definite inclusion. Great work amongst a great set of symphonies-but I always forget about him!!
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Patrick Murtha
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« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2015, 11:44:03 am »

Not sure what you want to do with Panufnik's fourth Symphony (sinfonia concertante) for flute harp and small string orchestra and seventh 'Metasinfonia', for organ timpani and strings.
Leon Orthel's Symphony No.4 for Piano and Orch. is a definite inclusion. Great work amongst a great set of symphonies-but I always forget about him!!

I hadn't branched into works where there are two or more solo instruments featured prominently, but they certainly exist.
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Gauk
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« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2015, 10:33:15 am »

Here is another one:

Rossini
Dvorak
Honegger
Rosenberg
Nyman

Who else should be on this list? There is one very prominent absentee!
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Gauk
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« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2015, 09:27:01 pm »

If this is proving too hard, I would give the following clue, that the connection in one case hinges on a very minor work, and in another, in knowing something about a very popular work - something that is perhaps not common knowledge.

Also, Britten can be added to the list (but not for a major work).
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Patrick Murtha
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« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2015, 09:39:39 pm »

If this is proving too hard, I would give the following clue, that the connection in one case hinges on a very minor work, and in another, in knowing something about a very popular work - something that is perhaps not common knowledge.

Also, Britten can be added to the list (but not for a major work).

I hadn't really given this any consideration because I've been so busy. But I believe the answer is - harmonium!

Rossini - Petite Messe Solenelle
Dvorak - Bagatelles for String Trio and Harmonium
Honegger - Le Roi David
Rosenberg - Huh
Nyman - several pieces, I think
Britten - Rejoice in the Lamb
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Gauk
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« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2015, 09:56:17 pm »

If this is proving too hard, I would give the following clue, that the connection in one case hinges on a very minor work, and in another, in knowing something about a very popular work - something that is perhaps not common knowledge.

Also, Britten can be added to the list (but not for a major work).

I hadn't really given this any consideration because I've been so busy. But I believe the answer is - harmonium!

Rossini - Petite Messe Solenelle
Dvorak - Bagatelles for String Trio and Harmonium
Honegger - Le Roi David
Rosenberg - Huh
Nyman - several pieces, I think
Britten - Rejoice in the Lamb

Clever! - in which case the next name might be Tchaikovsky - but not the answer I'm looking for, and would not fit part of the clue.
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Gauk
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« Reply #22 on: December 23, 2015, 04:33:39 pm »

I realise I never gave the answer to this.

They all wrote music about trains.

Rossini - Un Petit Train de Plaisir
Dvorak - Symphony No 9 (finale)
Honegger - Pacific 231
Rosenberg - The Railway Fugue
Nyman - Musique de Grande Vitesse

The obvious missing one was Villa-Lobos - The Little Train of the Caipira

The Britten was the Music for the Night Mail film.

There is also a piano etude by Alkan (Op. 27), and I'm sure plenty of others more obscure.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #23 on: April 26, 2016, 12:34:17 am »

I realise I never gave the answer to this.

They all wrote music about trains.

Rossini - Un Petit Train de Plaisir
Dvorak - Symphony No 9 (finale)
Honegger - Pacific 231
Rosenberg - The Railway Fugue
Nyman - Musique de Grande Vitesse

The obvious missing one was Villa-Lobos - The Little Train of the Caipira

The Britten was the Music for the Night Mail film.

There is also a piano etude by Alkan (Op. 27), and I'm sure plenty of others more obscure.
\
Blue Train Ballet by Milhaud??
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #24 on: April 26, 2016, 12:38:54 am »

Also some pieces about the Orient Express by Richard Rodnet Bennett and Phillip Sparke..
I know...picky picky
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #25 on: April 27, 2016, 09:56:38 am »

There's also Alkan's Le Chemin de Fer
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autoharp
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« Reply #26 on: April 27, 2016, 12:34:12 pm »

it's a popular subject

http://www.philpacey.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/musrail.html#1840

One of my favourites is this (unknown composer) from a 1920s German orchestra

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ahinton
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« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2016, 02:55:43 pm »

I was just about to mention Ives' Celestial Railroad and that Alkan's Chemin de fer had already been referred to before NMcG did so when I saw this astonishing list!

I think that even this omits mention of Joseph Kosma's song Les feuilles mortes (better known as Autumn Leaves) but perhaps that's because the excuse of them being on the line hadn't been thought of at the time when it was composed. Carter's CatÚnaires is missing from it, too - which is a shame, because we know what points mean, don;tg we?!...

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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #28 on: April 27, 2016, 04:27:39 pm »

Well, and since the finest manifestation of music is opera...  Grin

... Krenek's operatic romp Jonny Spielt Auf  ends with a scene at the station, where Daniello, the violin virtuoso, perishes under the wheels of a loco... the two young lovers are reunited... and then the station clock-face opens to reveal Jonny and his Jazz-Band (with Jonny playing Daniello's priceless violin) to play the show out, complete with train whistles and other station sounds Smiley

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ahinton
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« Reply #29 on: April 27, 2016, 05:19:10 pm »

Well, and since the finest manifestation of music is opera...  Grin

... Krenek's operatic romp Jonny Spielt Auf  ends with a scene at the station, where Daniello, the violin virtuoso, perishes under the wheels of a loco... the two young lovers are reunited... and then the station clock-face opens to reveal Jonny and his Jazz-Band (with Jonny playing Daniello's priceless violin) to play the show out, complete with train whistles and other station sounds Smiley

Hah! I'd forgotten that (not having heard that work in years). What an underappreciated composer Krenek is! More prolific than most and in a bewildering array of styles, he's relatively well represented on diss (and there's a far amount of his work on the ubiquitous YouTube) but all too rarely heard in the concert hall or opera house. The first three of his five symphonies, written when he was aged 20-22, are an especially remarkable early achievement (and all available to listen to on YT).

OK, let's railroad back to the topic!

Bach: Sleepers Wake
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