The Art-Music and Linguistics Forum
August 09, 2022, 05:42:53 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Here you may discover hundreds of little-known composers, hear thousands of long-forgotten compositions, contribute your own rare recordings, and discuss the Arts and Linguistics in an erudite and decorous atmosphere full of freedom and delight.
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

What are you currently listening to?


Pages: 1 ... 219 220 [221] 222 223 ... 239   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 75453 times)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 90
Offline Offline

Posts: 1882


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3300 on: December 19, 2021, 12:03:15 am »

Neglect can happen to a big name,it seems! Hindemith seems to be costing me a bit of money,currently! :( I should never have played that Hindemith cassette,should I?! ::) ;D But,listening to this,and some of the music here,I really can't see why anyone would regard his music as "dry"! This music is full of interesting orchestration and always absorbing. I am impressed by both these symphonies. At times beautiful. At others,thrilling,majestic! Always approachable!

Hindemith seems to get a bit of a bad press. His music is well worth investigating and Chandos did some wonderful discs with Tortellier and the BBC PO. Another composer drowned in the twentieth-century deluge of repertoire...

 ::)
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
cilgwyn
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 49
Offline Offline

Posts: 1942



View Profile
« Reply #3301 on: December 20, 2021, 03:51:44 am »

Schreker: The Birthday of the Infanta

   

Not the most inspiring artwork,but  never mind! What a lovely,magical score! :) And,that goes for everything on this cd! Another  chocolate box of delights! Yum! :) :) :) :) :)
Report Spam   Logged
cilgwyn
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 49
Offline Offline

Posts: 1942



View Profile
« Reply #3302 on: December 20, 2021, 04:31:40 am »

Neglect can happen to a big name,it seems! Hindemith seems to be costing me a bit of money,currently! :( I should never have played that Hindemith cassette,should I?! ::) ;D But,listening to this,and some of the music here,I really can't see why anyone would regard his music as "dry"! This music is full of interesting orchestration and always absorbing. I am impressed by both these symphonies. At times beautiful. At others,thrilling,majestic! Always approachable!

Hindemith seems to get a bit of a bad press. His music is well worth investigating and Chandos did some wonderful discs with Tortellier and the BBC PO. Another composer drowned in the twentieth-century deluge of repertoire...

 ::)
Allot of this music is,actually new to me! So far,it has no resemblance to what I might expect from the "bad press"! You start to wonder whether these people have actually really listened to his music?!! Hindemith's scoring is very far from "grey" or "dry"! It is often colourful and not lacking in humour! Most importantly,what I am hearing is consistently inventive and very absorbing! I have read more than once the suggestion that the reason for Daniel Jones' neglect is that "his music falls between two stools; too progressive for traditionalists yet too conventional for the avant-garde"*. When I was looking at reviews at recordings of Hindemith I have seen this cited (but perhaps,not in those exact words!) as a possible reason (or at least one of them) for Hindemith's relative neglect! Albeit,not to the extent of Jones! Of course,Daniel Jones never having been regarded as a major figure,in the way that Hindemith was. Nevertheless,it is true to say that Hindemith's fall from favour has been quite spectacular.


* https://www.walesartsreview.org/daniel-jones-symphonies-nos-3-and-5/
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 90
Offline Offline

Posts: 1882


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3303 on: December 20, 2021, 11:34:11 am »

Schreker: The Birthday of the Infanta

Not the most inspiring artwork,but  never mind! What a lovely,magical score! :) And,that goes for everything on this cd! Another  chocolate box of delights! Yum! :) :) :) :) :)

You know how much I enjoy Schreker's music! Lovely stuff...

 :)
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
cilgwyn
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 49
Offline Offline

Posts: 1942



View Profile
« Reply #3304 on: December 21, 2021, 01:16:58 am »

This 2 cd set arrived on Monday!



I love hearing composer's conducting their own music! Some of these recordings are mono. Some of them are in very good stereo,. And,particularly,good for the era (50's). (Produced by Walter Legge ,no less!) Just increase the bass a little. These are all fascinating recordings,some dating back to the 1930's. There is also a nice,informative,booklet,with quite allot of photo's of the great man,himself. Nice caricature on the front,too! A great set!
Report Spam   Logged
cilgwyn
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 49
Offline Offline

Posts: 1942



View Profile
« Reply #3305 on: December 21, 2021, 04:37:37 pm »



I tend to agree with LIonel when it comes to Italian opera. The odd aria,sung by a favourite singer,aside. Usually,of a bygone era! And La Rondine,is rather nice! (Puccini's one attempt at the operetta,genre). Rossini's best comedies are much more fun than sobbing clown's,though;and,along with the popular overtures,they're fulll of jolly ensemble's and tunes. This one has the kind of vintage cast,from days gone by,that draws me to a recording;and in glorious mono! The plot is another reason to like this opera. Bawdy shenanigans with men dressing up as Nuns (to get near ladies)! Sounds fun! :o
Report Spam   Logged
jimmatt
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 7
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


View Profile
« Reply #3306 on: December 22, 2021, 04:37:54 pm »

I am listening to Berlioz' Requiem, in particular the Sanctus. This is my favorite version with Charles Munch and the sublime tenor Leopold Simoneau. Though not particularly religious nor death-obsessed, I love requiems because it seems they are some of the high points of their composers output. I also love Cherubini, Verdi and the German Requiem by Brahms, Faure and Mariana Bottini and many more. The flute above the tenor in Berlioz is so beautiful as to be almost unearthly and I wonder when they take a breath. So, I guess, heathen or not I am responding to music in which the composers are trying to express what is "beyond" and it is very uplifting. Sorry I don't have a musicological discourse to offer, my inner feelings being soothed and gentled for the moment are enough for me.
Report Spam   Logged
jimmatt
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 7
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


View Profile
« Reply #3307 on: December 22, 2021, 06:29:36 pm »

I am listening to Berlioz' Requiem, in particular the Sanctus. This is my favorite version with Charles Munch and the sublime tenor Leopold Simoneau. Though not particularly religious nor death-obsessed, I love requiems because it seems they are some of the high points of their composers output. I also love Cherubini, Verdi and the German Requiem by Brahms, Faure and Mariana Bottini and many more. The flute above the tenor in Berlioz is so beautiful as to be almost unearthly and I wonder when they take a breath. So, I guess, heathen or not I am responding to music in which the composers are trying to express what is "beyond" and it is very uplifting. Sorry I don't have a musicological discourse to offer, my inner feelings being soothed and gentled for the moment are enough for me.
Report Spam   Logged
cilgwyn
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 49
Offline Offline

Posts: 1942



View Profile
« Reply #3308 on: December 23, 2021, 06:58:36 am »



A Doctor Speaks!

"As a Gp I often see patient's who are suffering from an overdose of a certain composer. After listening to piles of cd's of a particular composer they begin to suffer,obsessively,from tunes that go round and round in their head. They will begin to act strangely,even to the degree of conducting the cd's with their hands or a household object,like a toothbrush or frying spatula. This can,potentially,be very serious if hot,cooking oil is involved. They will hum portion's of the score,while they are at work,or on a bus or train,which can,potentially,lead to violent confrontation's with other passenger's or even a hospital admission. Only this week I had a consultation over the phone with a patient who was suffering from an overdose of Rossini operas. The busy ensemble's and overall,cheerful mood of the Rossini scores,in particular,La Cerentola,Il Barbiere di Siviglia,Le Comte Ory and L'Italiana in Algeri were getting on top of him,and he required something less upbeat and with a greater degree of depth,in order to calm him down. My recommendation as an experienced Gp was a large dose of Kammermusik to take as and when required. The Kammermusik prescribed is illustrated in the accompanying photograph;and this would be my top recommendation for an overdose of Rossin operas. If no Chailly Kammermusik is available,I would recommend Abbado as a suitable alternative". 
Report Spam   Logged
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 87
Offline Offline

Posts: 1274


View Profile
« Reply #3309 on: December 23, 2021, 08:28:53 am »

I love requiems because it seems they are some of the high points of their composers output.

Yes, Jim, very true. They are, aren't they?! If only Mozart had... Oh well, no point in going there.
Report Spam   Logged
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 87
Offline Offline

Posts: 1274


View Profile
« Reply #3310 on: December 23, 2021, 08:30:35 am »



A Doctor Speaks!

"As a Gp I often see patient's who are suffering from an overdose of a certain composer. After listening to piles of cd's of a particular composer they begin to suffer,obsessively,from tunes that go round and round in their head. They will begin to act strangely,even to the degree of conducting the cd's with their hands or a household object,like a toothbrush or frying spatula. This can,potentially,be very serious if hot,cooking oil is involved. They will hum portion's of the score,while they are at work,or on a bus or train,which can,potentially,lead to violent confrontation's with other passenger's or even a hospital admission. Only this week I had a consultation over the phone with a patient who was suffering from an overdose of Rossini operas. The busy ensemble's and overall,cheerful mood of the Rossini scores,in particular,La Cerentola,Il Barbiere di Siviglia,Le Comte Ory and L'Italiana in Algeri were getting on top of him,and he required something less upbeat and with a greater degree of depth,in order to calm him down. My recommendation as an experienced Gp was a large dose of Kammermusik to take as and when required. The Kammermusik prescribed is illustrated in the accompanying photograph;and this would be my top recommendation for an overdose of Rossin operas. If no Chailly Kammermusik is available,I would recommend Abbado as a suitable alternative". 

 ;D ;D Make sure you don't take more than the prescribed dose! I can't imagine what that might do to one.
Report Spam   Logged
jimmatt
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 7
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


View Profile
« Reply #3311 on: December 23, 2021, 03:20:01 pm »

I can imagine it, I have suffered from music overdose for many years, oh, when will it stop? Never, I think.
Report Spam   Logged
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 87
Offline Offline

Posts: 1274


View Profile
« Reply #3312 on: December 24, 2021, 04:22:30 pm »

I can imagine it, I have suffered from music overdose for many years, oh, when will it stop? Never, I think.

I'm sure you're right, Jim.

This Christmas gift today:



They may be a 'regional' orchestra, but the BBC NOW band did a splendid job on this most glorious of symphonies. Anybody who thinks that only English conductors understand how to do Elgar would be proved wrong by this Japanese maestro's most majestic interpretation.
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 90
Offline Offline

Posts: 1882


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3313 on: December 25, 2021, 03:30:25 pm »



Throughout his six-disc Bantock survey for Hyperion Vernon Handley was exemplary, except when it came to the Overture to a Greek Tragedy (1911), one of the composer's loveliest orchestral scores, and fittingly dedicated to Sibelius. As a performance it's a bloody disaster with the central allegro taken at half-speed. Don't bother with it, seek out Nicholas Braithwaite's rendition on Lyrita for a bit of the old "Whey-hey!"



...PS. Buy the Hyperion boxed set anyway to provide yourself with hours and hours of lovely Bantock. Just sayin', like...

 ;)
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 90
Offline Offline

Posts: 1882


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3314 on: December 25, 2021, 03:42:33 pm »

his most glorious of symphonies. Anybody who thinks that only English conductors understand how to do Elgar would be proved wrong by this Japanese maestro's most majestic interpretation.


Y'ain't kiddin'. I regard Elgar's two completed symphonies as towering works in the repertoire: thematic genius, harmonic genius, orchestral genius, structural genius, thrills and spills aplenty - what's not to love? I also greatly admire Anthony Payne's realisation of the third symphony and find it incredibly moving. My personal favourites are James Judd and the Halle in No.1 (IMP PDC 2019) and Edward Downes with the BBC PO in No. 2 (Naxos 8.550635), but there are now, thankfully, so many recordings of these wonderful scores...

 :)
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

Pages: 1 ... 219 220 [221] 222 223 ... 239   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum


Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy