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What are you currently listening to?


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Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 64350 times)
dhibbard
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« Reply #2970 on: September 12, 2021, 05:38:39 am »



wonderful set   but having issues with the CDs.. seems they may be defective... wonder if its the printing on the CD.. they make a lot of noise when they play... a few don't play at all.... brand new set
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #2971 on: September 12, 2021, 07:41:02 am »

George Dyson's Choral Symphony, Concerto Leggiero, want to hear as much as I can, maybe even Canterbury Tales. Doesn't seem he is mentioned very often here, but I think he is very good with lush orchestration and melody lines.


He popped up fairly recently - http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,3469.0.html

 Smiley



wonderful set   but having issues with the CDs.. seems they may be defective... wonder if its the printing on the CD.. they make a lot of noise when they play... a few don't play at all.... brand new set

Sounds like one to complain about and either get a refund or a replacement. Has it been reviewed online?

 Undecided
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #2972 on: September 12, 2021, 12:26:23 pm »

Coleridge-Taylor's The Song of Hiawatha (1898-1900) in the broadcast from the 2013 Three Choirs Festival (BIMA), a valuable alternative to Kenneth Alwyn's splendid complete recording (Argo). There are fine soloists and the chorus clearly relish their narrative role in the drama. Peter Nardone takes generally steady tempi (probably due to the Cathedral acoustic, which is tamed by the BBC microphones) which allows plenty of detail to be heard.

Such a pity that Malcolm Sargent never got round to recording the final segment of the trilogy Hiawatha's Departure, as his renditions of the first two parts for EMI are quite special (although there are small cuts in The Death of Minnehaha). Having sung Hiawatha's Wedding Feast, what looks easy on the page is deceptive - there's no room to hide. No wonder Sullivan, Parry, Stanford, Jaeger and Elgar were impressed by such precocious talent...

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2973 on: September 12, 2021, 12:31:16 pm »

Coleridge-Taylor's The Song of Hiawatha (1898-1900) in the broadcast from the 2013 Three Choirs Festival (BIMA), a valuable alternative to Kenneth Alwyn's splendid complete recording (Argo). There are fine soloists and the chorus clearly relish their narrative role in the drama. Peter Nardone takes generally steady tempi (probably due to the Cathedral acoustic, which is tamed by the BBC microphones) which allows plenty of detail to be heard.

Such a pity that Malcolm Sargent never got round to recording the final segment of the trilogy Hiawatha's Departure, as his renditions of the first two parts for EMI are quite special (although there are small cuts in The Death of Minnehaha). Having sung Hiawatha's Wedding Feast, what looks easy on the page is deceptive - there's no room to hide. No wonder Sullivan, Parry, Stanford, Jaeger and Elgar were impressed by such precocious talent...

 Smiley
Agreed on all points. I can't think of a more satisfying way to spend a Sunday!
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Albion
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Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


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« Reply #2974 on: September 14, 2021, 10:35:59 am »

Two of the finest works for string orchestra in the repertoire - Parry's English Suite and Lady Radnor's Suite...



...oh, and some tit-bits by Elgar as a make-weight.

 Cheesy
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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2975 on: September 14, 2021, 11:08:47 am »

Two of the finest works for string orchestra in the repertoire - Parry's English Suite and Lady Radnor's Suite...



...oh, and some tit-bits by Elgar as a make-weight.

 Cheesy
Agreed again!
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Albion
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« Reply #2976 on: September 14, 2021, 11:30:43 am »

Two of the finest works for string orchestra in the repertoire - Parry's English Suite and Lady Radnor's Suite...



...oh, and some tit-bits by Elgar as a make-weight.

 Cheesy
Agreed again!

Uncanny, eh? Parry's writing for strings is second to none, neither Dvorak nor Tchaikovsky. He was a British pioneer of the difficult genre of string orchestra - Elgar and RVW followed suit with wonderful works. Also Bantock...

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2977 on: September 14, 2021, 02:44:02 pm »



Uncanny, eh? Parry's writing for strings is second to none, neither Dvorak nor Tchaikovsky. He was a British pioneer of the difficult genre of string orchestra - Elgar and RVW followed suit with wonderful works. Also Bantock...

 Smiley

Also SC-T with his Four Novelletten for String Orchestra (albeit with optional tambourine and triangle). The third movement 'Valse' is a particularly impassioned utterance that owes not a little to Tchaikovsky. I'll shut up now. Lips sealed
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dhibbard
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« Reply #2978 on: September 15, 2021, 02:52:30 am »



finally got this CD.... some good stuff!!
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dhibbard
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« Reply #2979 on: September 15, 2021, 02:54:06 am »

  this also... the last CD in the set.


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Albion
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« Reply #2980 on: September 15, 2021, 01:29:17 pm »

Sir Alexander Mackenzie's lovely Canadian Rhapsody (BIMA).

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"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
cilgwyn
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« Reply #2981 on: September 15, 2021, 05:48:44 pm »



I think I can see a picture now?! Shocked If you just move the aerial to the left a bit & hold it a bit higher! (stand on the coffee table!) Yep,that's it......just stay where you are!! Smiley
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2982 on: September 15, 2021, 06:38:59 pm »


I think I can see a picture now?! Shocked If you just move the aerial to the left a bit & hold it a bit higher! (stand on the coffee table!) Yep,that's it......just stay where you are!! Smiley

 Grin Grin I'm willing to assist but with my trick back you may find that I become permanently locked in position on your coffee table!
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2983 on: September 15, 2021, 06:45:41 pm »



A revelatory performance of SC-T's Hiawatha Overture by the LPO (no less) under rising star American conductor, Joshua Weilerstein . Anyone who has doubts about the beauty and power of this work will have them dispelled by this performance. The members of the LPO are clearly enjoying themselves with SC-T's masterly orchestration.
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #2984 on: September 16, 2021, 12:23:12 am »


I think I can see a picture now?! Shocked If you just move the aerial to the left a bit & hold it a bit higher! (stand on the coffee table!) Yep,that's it......just stay where you are!! Smiley

 Grin Grin I'm willing to assist but with my trick back you may find that I become permanently locked in position on your coffee table!
Excellent! As long as you haven't got a shaky hand I won't need a stand for it! Grin
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