The Art-Music Forum
May 24, 2022, 06:57:03 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: A place to discover and discuss a wide range of composers and music (both familiar and forgotten), recordings, broadcasts, books and art. Register, contribute and explore!
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

What are you currently listening to?


Pages: 1 ... 212 213 [214] 215 216 ... 235   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What are you currently listening to?  (Read 73482 times)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3195 on: November 03, 2021, 01:28:25 pm »

This is the best of the four Marco Polo Sullivan discs. Three sets of incidental music, recorded in a lovely acoustic. You get the Macbeth concert suite assembled by Sullivan for the 1889 Leeds Festival plus what was salvageable by Wilfred Bendall from King Arthur (1895) in 1904 and the complete The Merry Wives of Windsor (1874). Alas, Sullivan wrote no overture to the last as he "didn't want to compete with the pretty one by Nicolai", he was too modest by half.



 Smiley

actually just got this one the post today!!

I'm sure you'll enjoy it!

 Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3196 on: November 03, 2021, 01:57:56 pm »



What a lovely score. Suitably dedicated to the memory of Richard Hickox who was to have conducted, it's given an excellent performance by David Lloyd-Jones. Sometimes the recorded balance of the orchestra is a bit distant and you may have to up the volume but overall a vindication of a much-maligned work: so many highlights besides the obvious "O moon, art thou clad", "Plantagenesta!", "The wind blows cold", "Her Southern splendour", "Lord of our chosen race" and "How oft beneath the far-off Syrian skies". No wonder it originally ran for 155 consecutive performances and this rendition was nominated for a Grammy. Stand-out soloists are Toby Spence (Ivanhoe), Geraldine McGreevy (Rebecca), James Rutherford (Sir Brian), Matthew Brook (Friar Tuck) and Neal Davies (King Richard). There is nothing more thrilling in British opera than the concluding scene of Act II!

 Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3197 on: November 03, 2021, 06:53:30 pm »



Yes, it's straight onto yet more Sullivan! A score that proves his supposed decline in the 1890s is a myth - it was simply the wrong opera in the wrong theatre at the wrong time (a "romantic musical drama" at the Savoy in 1898). Another strong showing from Chandos, who give us the complete score (including three numbers cut after opening-night) and field a stellar cast. The Devil, lots of maids in pointy hats, knights in armour, beauty contests, a magical stone "upon which the Virgin's feet once trod" (a likely tale methinks) and general medieval cobblers. Sullivan wrestled with the lyrics, as his librettists (Pinero and Comyns Carr) were not susceptible to criticism - "Quod scripsi, scripsi" - but he produced some truly splendid music. The Act I finale is a great highlight, quite as wonderful of those of Iolanthe and The Yeomen of the Guard. My word, the orchestral score is staggering, requiring virtuoso playing especially from the violins. I recall Martin Yates (chairman of the Sir Arthur Sullivan Society) telling me that the strings of the BBC NOW turned up to the rehearsals expecting an easy-ride and their eyes were goggling within minutes! But then Sullivan never made it easy for his players - just wait for The Martyr of Antioch! Sullivan was the foremost orchestrator amongst his British contemporaries.

 Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
dhibbard
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 68
Offline Offline

Posts: 2411



View Profile
« Reply #3198 on: November 03, 2021, 07:38:37 pm »

This is the best of the four Marco Polo Sullivan discs. Three sets of incidental music, recorded in a lovely acoustic. You get the Macbeth concert suite assembled by Sullivan for the 1889 Leeds Festival plus what was salvageable by Wilfred Bendall from King Arthur (1895) in 1904 and the complete The Merry Wives of Windsor (1874). Alas, Sullivan wrote no overture to the last as he "didn't want to compete with the pretty one by Nicolai", he was too modest by half.



 Smiley

actually just got this one the post today!!

I'm sure you'll enjoy it!

 Smiley



did Naxos remaster these recordings?     I notice the Naxos releases of the old Marco Polo are louder in volume.....
Report Spam   Logged
Lionel Harrison
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 84
Offline Offline

Posts: 1244


View Profile
« Reply #3199 on: November 03, 2021, 11:32:45 pm »



Yes, it's straight onto yet more Sullivan! A score that proves his supposed decline in the 1890s is a myth - it was simply the wrong opera in the wrong theatre at the wrong time (a "romantic musical drama" at the Savoy in 1898). Another strong showing from Chandos, who give us the complete score (including three numbers cut after opening-night) and field a stellar cast. The Devil, lots of maids in pointy hats, knights in armour, beauty contests, a magical stone "upon which the Virgin's feet once trod" (a likely tale methinks) and general medieval cobblers. Sullivan wrestled with the lyrics, as his librettists (Pinero and Comyns Carr) were not susceptible to criticism - "Quod scripsi, scripsi" - but he produced some truly splendid music. The Act I finale is a great highlight, quite as wonderful of those of Iolanthe and The Yeomen of the Guard. My word, the orchestral score is staggering, requiring virtuoso playing especially from the violins. I recall Martin Yates (chairman of the Sir Arthur Sullivan Society) telling me that the strings of the BBC NOW turned up to the rehearsals expecting an easy-ride and their eyes were goggling within minutes! But then Sullivan never made it easy for his players - just wait for The Martyr of Antioch! Sullivan was the foremost orchestrator amongst his British contemporaries.

 Smiley

Yet he never wrote anything that was awkward or ungrateful; yes, there are some string passages (especially) that need 'looking at' (as Gervase Hughes elegantly puts it) but Sullivan was incapable of writing unidiomatically for any orchestral instrument. I agree that he was by far and away the most brilliant orchestrator of the period in Britain.
Report Spam   Logged
jonah
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 1
Offline Offline

Posts: 70


View Profile
« Reply #3200 on: November 04, 2021, 12:24:14 am »

Please do not hide your comments about Sullivan or, indeed, other composers under ‘what are you currently listening to?’, but open a separate thread, so that those interested can read and add to.

I often ignore ‘what are you currently listening to?’ as it so often digresses from what was originally mentioned, so a separate thread would be helpful.

Report Spam   Logged
dhibbard
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 68
Offline Offline

Posts: 2411



View Profile
« Reply #3201 on: November 04, 2021, 03:23:05 am »

good idea
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3202 on: November 04, 2021, 04:41:20 pm »

The sort of repertoire that Richard Hickox excelled in.

Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3203 on: November 05, 2021, 10:37:58 am »

Currently I shall be mostly dipping into the



An extravagant purchase of yesteryear? I think not: so much lovely music, so many excellent performances and it passes the time of day...

 Wink
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3204 on: November 05, 2021, 02:31:56 pm »

Currently I shall be mostly dipping into the



An extravagant purchase of yesteryear? I think not: so much lovely music, so many excellent performances and it passes the time of day...

 Wink

There is no more thrilling an opera than Esclarmonde (1888-89)



If you buy this set for nothing else, buy it for this!

 Cheesy
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3205 on: November 05, 2021, 04:31:44 pm »

Yet more French delight! Gounod's 1885 oratorio



in a lovely performance by the impeccable Michel Plasson. We all know the great Judex orchestral interlude but there is so much more in this work.

 Smiley

Why hasn't The Redemption (an even bigger hit and the triumph of the 1882 Birmingham Festival) been recorded?

 Huh
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
Jim
Level 3
***

Times thanked: 10
Offline Offline

Posts: 100



View Profile
« Reply #3206 on: November 06, 2021, 12:19:33 am »

This is the best of the four Marco Polo Sullivan discs. Three sets of incidental music, recorded in a lovely acoustic. You get the Macbeth concert suite assembled by Sullivan for the 1889 Leeds Festival plus what was salvageable by Wilfred Bendall from King Arthur (1895) in 1904 and the complete The Merry Wives of Windsor (1874). Alas, Sullivan wrote no overture to the last as he "didn't want to compete with the pretty one by Nicolai", he was too modest by half.



 Smiley

Thanks Albion, just dug this out. I was working through the Sullivan songs CDs when I chanced on your posts. Listened to The Beauty Stone last night, quite surprising stylistically for a composer one thinks one knows. Ivanhoe next. Nice also to see Dyson's Quo Vadis in there too, which I rate highly.
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3207 on: November 06, 2021, 06:38:18 am »

This is the best of the four Marco Polo Sullivan discs. Three sets of incidental music, recorded in a lovely acoustic. You get the Macbeth concert suite assembled by Sullivan for the 1889 Leeds Festival plus what was salvageable by Wilfred Bendall from King Arthur (1895) in 1904 and the complete The Merry Wives of Windsor (1874). Alas, Sullivan wrote no overture to the last as he "didn't want to compete with the pretty one by Nicolai", he was too modest by half.



 Smiley

Thanks Albion, just dug this out. I was working through the Sullivan songs CDs when I chanced on your posts. Listened to The Beauty Stone last night, quite surprising stylistically for a composer one thinks one knows. Ivanhoe next. Nice also to see Dyson's Quo Vadis in there too, which I rate highly.

It's all good stuff, and all well recorded! I have no idea whether or not Dyson knew much of Sullivan's music but they both shared a natural fluency of expression and an enviable gift for melody.

 Smiley
Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)
dhibbard
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 68
Offline Offline

Posts: 2411



View Profile
« Reply #3208 on: November 06, 2021, 11:40:44 pm »




any thoughts on this recording?   Just got in the mail yesterday
Report Spam   Logged
Albion
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 85
Offline Offline

Posts: 1831


Frederic Cowen (1852-1935)


View Profile
« Reply #3209 on: November 08, 2021, 03:25:25 pm »




any thoughts on this recording?   Just got in the mail yesterday

Generally it's a lovely rendition of Ruddigore, though George Baker was nearly 80 when he recorded the "young farmer" Robin Oakapple!

 Roll Eyes

As has been mentioned elsewhere, the Vivian Dunn Merchant of Venice is incomparable. Enjoy!

 Smiley

As for me, I'm still stuck on

Report Spam   Logged

"A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it." (Sydney Grew, 1922)

Pages: 1 ... 212 213 [214] 215 216 ... 235   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum


Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy