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cilgwyn
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« Reply #2340 on: June 14, 2021, 08:56:13 pm »

Gilbert & Sullivan: The Mikado Soloists,Chorus & Orchestra of the Ohio Light Opera/  J. Lynn Thompson        Albany 2 cd's

And now,it's the turn of the American's! This recording includes the dialogue. Okapple don't like this recording (see below) but I think it's quite good. I've only listened to it once,so I can't really pass judgement! Having listened through a slew of Mikado's,over the last few days,I should be able to,soon! I like most of their recordings,though! Allot of people don't like the dialogue;but I still find it surprising that this is the first recording of The Mikado ever to include it! And there have been allot! That said,although I do like to hear it,at times,I can live without it! And it's often nice to hear,just the music,without the yackety-yak! Grin But here it is! And I can't detect any American accent's........yet! Except the bit where Ko-Ko says,"Howdy Pardner!" to The Mikado! (I'm Joking! Shocked Grin)

http://gasdisc.oakapplepress.com/mikoloc.htm  Ouch! They really don't like it! Shocked  Grin Poor,Julie Wright!!

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cilgwyn
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« Reply #2341 on: June 15, 2021, 12:56:59 am »

Well,Oakapple obviously know far more about G & S than I'll ever do,granted;but I found the Ohio Light Opera recording of The Mikado very enjoyable and well sung! Okay,there's no one with a voice as distinctive as some of the performers on those old D'Oyly Carte or Sargent sets,or vocally,on a par with the latter;but they're all pretty good,to my ears! In fact,it's one of the most enjoyable recording's I've listened,in terms of sheer entertainment value. The delivery of the dialogue is nice & lively too! For someone who professes to enjoy the dialogue,it actually had me listening to some of it!! Roll Eyes Grin As to American accents? Again,I didn't have any problem here. I think they all manage their English accents very well! And who cares if the odd inflexion slips in,as long as the sing & perform well! If that is canned applause,it's right at the end & very brief! (Which is a definite plus!). A good recording,imo! And isn't it great that the American's are enjoying and recording this wonderful music! Nice to have a libretto & some photos of the production,with the set (albeit,small) too! Nice! Smiley Smiley Smiley

The BBC Mikado's,next!!
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2342 on: June 15, 2021, 08:56:21 am »

Gilbert & Sullivan: The Mikado Soloists,Chorus & Orchestra of the Ohio Light Opera/  J. Lynn Thompson        Albany 2 cd's

And now,it's the turn of the American's! This recording includes the dialogue. Okapple don't like this recording (see below) but I think it's quite good. I've only listened to it once,so I can't really pass judgement! Having listened through a slew of Mikado's,over the last few days,I should be able to,soon! I like most of their recordings,though! Allot of people don't like the dialogue;but I still find it surprising that this is the first recording of The Mikado ever to include it! And there have been allot! That said,although I do like to hear it,at times,I can live without it! And it's often nice to hear,just the music,without the yackety-yak! Grin But here it is! And I can't detect any American accent's........yet! Except the bit where Ko-Ko says,"Howdy Pardner!" to The Mikado! (I'm Joking! Shocked Grin)

http://gasdisc.oakapplepress.com/mikoloc.htm  Ouch! They really don't like it! Shocked  Grin Poor,Julie Wright!!



Aside from one remark about cuts, the Oakapple people don't seem to review the performance at all, just the logistics the OLOC use in recording the piece. I suppose it's fair enough to take a view about such matters but it really ought to be in the context of wider comment about the qualities of the performance as a whole. For all we know from this review, it could be artisically the most brilliant Mikado ever put on disc -- or the worst: they don't say. To be consitent, however, I ought to add that my opinion is that critics are, on the whole, best disregarded in any case. As Sibelius is supposed to have remarked, "Who ever put up a statue to a critic?"
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2343 on: June 15, 2021, 09:02:27 am »

Gilbert and Sullivan: The Mikado    The 1907 Odeon Mikado with Walter Passmore as Ko-Ko (Soloists,Chorus & Orchestra & the Unknown Conductor! Grin)

This recording,made just by singing into a horn,sounds amazingly good! The recording,which I burned onto a cd,lasts 69 minutes & 30 seconds. So,there's quite allot here! Including the 'N' word (more,than once)! This is a very enjoyable performance,with a lively chorus. Walter Passmore breaks into a falsetto at the end of "Tit Willow". I'm not too mad on the use of falsetto in this song;but Passmore manages to make me laugh every time! There's an amusing exchange,later in the recording,with a chap who butts in;only to be told very firmly,that "I haven't finished singing,yet!" This recording was released on an Lp once,by Pearl;but never reissued on cd,sadly! Sad You'd have needed that laugh,listening to this recording,in 1907! And an arm like Popeye the Sailor Man! Grin The recording appears to lose speed at one point & the vocalists begun to sound like a late night in a pub! Roll Eyes Grin Fortunately,this is a brief blip;and 'Popeye the Sailor' is on hand to wind it up! Grin (HMS Pinafore,would be more appropriate,here!) Still,back in the early 1900's this is how this recording would have sounded,when you forgot to wind it;or didn't wind it enough! (I should know,having two wind-up gramophone's,myself!) There's some rowdy cheering from the cast during "Here's a how-de-do!" which all adds to the fun. The 'N' word aside,this is a very enjoyable recording,with a lively cast! The presence of Walter Passmore means this is,also,a recording of great historical importance!



I have to say that even with my airy disregard for sonics, I'd be hard put to it to listen to 69 minuites of something recorded in 1907! It's of historical interest, undoubtedly, especially with the presence of Passmore, but would I enjoy it? I have to say that I seriously doubt it: you are a better man than I am, cilgwyn.  Grin
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« Reply #2344 on: June 15, 2021, 02:50:09 pm »

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cilgwyn
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« Reply #2345 on: June 15, 2021, 08:20:43 pm »

The Pirates of Penzance  Soloists,Chorus & Light Opera Orch/ Malcolm Sargent   (The 1929 D'Oyly Carte Recording)   Arabesque 2 cd's

Major-General   George Baker
Pirate King      Peter Dawson
Samuel           Stuart Robertson
Frederic          Derek Oldham
Sergeant of Police   Leo Sheffield
Mabel             Elsie Griffin
Edith              Nellie Briercliffe
Kate                Nellie Walker
Ruth               Dorothy Gill

Apparently,this is one of the most popular of all the early recordings of G & S. This is a very good performance,indeed! The presence of Peter Dawson as the Pirate King rather speaks for itself! A man who could make the most naff song sound great! Although,even he might have had a bit of a problem with the stuff they write now!! Roll Eyes The sound on this set is,absolutely excellent! Indeed,it sounds like the latest SACD digital technology compared to the 1907 recording of The Mikado I was listening to (enduring?!! Shocked Grin) last night! This one wouldn't frighten you too much,Lionel! Grin In fact,the engineer responsible for transfering this recording,has done such a good job,it's hard to believe it's,actually,a 1929 recording!

The BBC recording's of The Mikado from 1966 and 1989 (Rec.1986) are excellent! The 1966 recording's have the edge,for me;despite the mono sound & the quaint (but evocative) introductory narrations. If you like dialogue,you can't go better than the BBC. At least,in their heyday! And the cast's are first class! I don't know if it's just me though? But,Derek Hammond Stroud always sound's a bit like Christopher Biggin's,if he could sing! (I'm glad it isn't!! Grin)

I also listened to the Sargent (Glyndebourne emi) recordings of Iolanthe and Ruddigore,earlier today! The singing and the orchestra (with those extra strings,you referred to) sound just great! Smiley You don't get voices with that distinctive sound,these days,imo! Although,I suppose I'm just being an old fogey? (I am!! Sad Grin). The presence of Owen Brannigan,in several of these recordings,is a definite plus. I've always liked his,very distinctive tones! His voice,just seems,to ring out! It had a lovely,rich sound! They don't make 'em like that,anymore! George Baker,does as some have pointed out (at Oakapple,among others) sound like a man who's getting on (How dare he get old!! Angry Grin)but he's got a nice timbre to his voice,he's got great timing,and he know's his stuff! Although,he,apparently,never appeared in an actual stage production of a G & S operetta. Having been brought in by HMV,because they thought Henry Lytton's voice wasn't suited to the Gramophone.
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« Reply #2346 on: June 15, 2021, 10:32:10 pm »

I think I might buy a copy,when they have one of their sales?! Although,I think this release is a,fairly,recent one? I was wondering? Are you a Brianite,Lionel?! Half Brianite? Or maybe,a Neverheardanoteofhismusicinme lifeite?!! Shocked Grin
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« Reply #2347 on: June 16, 2021, 12:10:21 am »

I have to say that even with my airy disregard for sonics, I'd be hard put to it to listen to 69 minuites of something recorded in 1907! It's of historical interest, undoubtedly, especially with the presence of Passmore, but would I enjoy it? I have to say that I seriously doubt it: you are a better man than I am, cilgwyn.  Grin
I thought,with your love of sausage frying noises,you'd be rushing to download this one?!! Grin
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2348 on: June 16, 2021, 08:58:24 am »

The Pirates of Penzance  Soloists,Chorus & Light Opera Orch/ Malcolm Sargent   (The 1929 D'Oyly Carte Recording)   Arabesque 2 cd's

Major-General   George Baker
Pirate King      Peter Dawson
Samuel           Stuart Robertson
Frederic          Derek Oldham
Sergeant of Police   Leo Sheffield
Mabel             Elsie Griffin
Edith              Nellie Briercliffe
Kate                Nellie Walker
Ruth               Dorothy Gill

Apparently,this is one of the most popular of all the early recordings of G & S. This is a very good performance,indeed! The presence of Peter Dawson as the Pirate King rather speaks for itself! A man who could make the most naff song sound great! Although,even he might have had a bit of a problem with the stuff they write now!! Roll Eyes The sound on this set is,absolutely excellent! Indeed,it sounds like the latest SACD digital technology compared to the 1907 recording of The Mikado I was listening to (enduring?!! Shocked Grin) last night! This one wouldn't frighten you too much,Lionel! Grin In fact,the engineer responsible for transfering this recording,has done such a good job,it's hard to believe it's,actually,a 1929 recording!

The BBC recording's of The Mikado from 1966 and 1989 (Rec.1986) are excellent! The 1966 recording's have the edge,for me;despite the mono sound & the quaint (but evocative) introductory narrations. If you like dialogue,you can't go better than the BBC. At least,in their heyday! And the cast's are first class! I don't know if it's just me though? But,Derek Hammond Stroud always sound's a bit like Christopher Biggin's,if he could sing! (I'm glad it isn't!! Grin)

I also listened to the Sargent (Glyndebourne emi) recordings of Iolanthe and Ruddigore,earlier today! The singing and the orchestra (with those extra strings,you referred to) sound just great! Smiley You don't get voices with that distinctive sound,these days,imo! Although,I suppose I'm just being an old fogey? (I am!! Sad Grin). The presence of Owen Brannigan,in several of these recordings,is a definite plus. I've always liked his,very distinctive tones! His voice,just seems,to ring out! It had a lovely,rich sound! They don't make 'em like that,anymore! George Baker,does as some have pointed out (at Oakapple,among others) sound like a man who's getting on (How dare he get old!! Angry Grin)but he's got a nice timbre to his voice,he's got great timing,and he know's his stuff! Although,he,apparently,never appeared in an actual stage production of a G & S operetta. Having been brought in by HMV,because they thought Henry Lytton's voice wasn't suited to the Gramophone.

I do so agree with you about Peter Dawson -- but then anyone who thought otherwise would have to be seriously cloth-eared; he had a wonderful voice. Owen Brannigan likewise; I was at a function once at which he was also present and even while he was just chatting informally one could hear his sonorous tones all round the room. It wasn't that he was shouting, it's simply that his voice was just so big!

Yes, George Baker was getting on when he recorded those Sargent sets but I don't think that in those 'character' roles the actual quality of his voice mattered -- as you say, it was all about the delivery. Let's face it, getting old will happen (or, in my case, has happened!) to all of us if we are lucky. If you want to hear George Baker in his vocal prime, Sargent's 1929 recording of SC-T's The Death of Minnehaha will tell you all you need to know.
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« Reply #2349 on: June 16, 2021, 09:05:54 am »


Or maybe,a Neverheardanoteofhismusicinme lifeite?!! Shocked Grin

 Lips sealed Shhh!! You have stumbled upon one of my dark secrets. The only recordings of Brian I own are of Symphonies nos 8 and 9, and I only have those because they are included in a 24-CD boxed set of the recordings of Sir Charles Groves which I bought some years ago. I have no opinion about Brian, therefore. Dammit all, there are only so many hours in the day and there isn't time for everything!   Shocked
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Lionel Harrison
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« Reply #2350 on: June 16, 2021, 09:17:43 am »

I have to say that even with my airy disregard for sonics, I'd be hard put to it to listen to 69 minuites of something recorded in 1907! It's of historical interest, undoubtedly, especially with the presence of Passmore, but would I enjoy it? I have to say that I seriously doubt it: you are a better man than I am, cilgwyn.  Grin
I thought,with your love of sausage frying noises,you'd be rushing to download this one?!! Grin
Grin You make a fair point! But in my defence, I'd say that it's not the sound of frying sausages that puts me off but the general acoustic of mechanical (as opposed to electrical) recordings: they always sound to me as if they were made with the performers stationed at the bottom of a very deep well, while the horn was positioned at the top!
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« Reply #2351 on: June 16, 2021, 03:48:52 pm »

Radio 3 Composer of the Week: Robert Simpson     Episode 5 "The End is C Sharp"

Donald Macleod explores Robert Simpsonís life after his move to Ireland in 1986.

I'm listening to radio on the internet!! Shocked Grin Actually,I just happened to be listening to another radio station (Rte Radio 1) which I usually listen to on a radio. But they're carrying out maintenance work (reluctantly! Grin) on the Long Wave transmitter. I did get caught out today,mind! I switched on Radio 4 Long Wave for the news. Of course,it's cricket,now & I'm afraid I'm not a fan!! So,it was good old FM!

They're playing an excerpt from Simpson's Ninth symphony,now! Sadly,his move to Ireland didn't work out to plan! I remember writing a,slightly,over enthuastic letter to him,in which I expressed ideas ideas for a composition ,I had in mind (conveniently,omitting that I couldn't read music & could just about play chopsticks! Roll Eyes Grin) I wrote another letter apologising,for this. His wife sent me a very nice letter telling not to worry (and see a doctor! Grin) & thanking me for my letter! It was only then I learn that Robert Simpson had suffered a stroke. I've still got the letter!

Listening to this excerpt! Simpson was interested in astronomy,of course. The photographs on the front of those Hyperion cd'd always seem very apt. If ever a composer sounded 'cosmic'! The still movements always seem to evoke the vastness of space. At least,for me! The noisy bits pulsar's and quasar's. (And thing's like that!) Whatever they are?! (Those puffy,cheesy,potato snacks?! Undecided Grin) No I'm not into astronomy;but I know they have them in outer space! I liked the excerpt from his String Quartet No 13! Unfortunately,as you point out;there's just isn't enough time to explore everything. And Robert Simpson composed allot of quartets (I don't want start up that path! The expense!! Sad)
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cilgwyn
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« Reply #2352 on: June 16, 2021, 04:03:37 pm »

Vortex
The Desford Colliery Caterpillar Band
James Watson (conductor)

(Radio 3 Composer of the Week: Robert Simpson:  Episode 5)

Interesting! Very much like one of those symphonies;but with just the brass,of course! I may listen to another episode?

This has interrupted my Gilbert and Sullivan marathon!!!
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« Reply #2353 on: June 16, 2021, 04:18:50 pm »

Radio 3 Composer of the Week: Robert Simpson     Episode 4  "Breaking From the Past"

Apparently,Simpson and his wife had a recipe,in their cook book,for "Barbecued Critic"! Mostly,of his wife,Angela's,devising! So,I gather he (they) didn't like them?!! Grin

I'm wondering if these program's are repeat's? I'm sure I've heard the presenter telling me about that 'recipe',before? !

Some of the main interest here revolves around his various run-in's with the Beeb. I find myself agreeing with allot of what he said. But of course,this ground has been covered before here,more than once.So,I'll leave it at that!
Robert Simpson's music can be a bit of a tough listen. But,there's nothing as tortuous as I find in the music of Tippett. Thank goodness!! Roll Eyes Grin

Regarding,Havergal Brian! I think he's a worthwhile composer;but as,you say,there isn't enough time in the day! With 32 symphonies and the biggest symphony ever composer;one rabbit hole to avoid! And it is a big rabbit hole! (Been there! Done that! Roll Eyes And I say that as an ex member of the HB Society!! Grin)

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« Reply #2354 on: June 16, 2021, 04:51:24 pm »

I have to say that even with my airy disregard for sonics, I'd be hard put to it to listen to 69 minuites of something recorded in 1907! It's of historical interest, undoubtedly, especially with the presence of Passmore, but would I enjoy it? I have to say that I seriously doubt it: you are a better man than I am, cilgwyn.  Grin
I thought,with your love of sausage frying noises,you'd be rushing to download this one?!! Grin
Grin You make a fair point! But in my defence, I'd say that it's not the sound of frying sausages that puts me off but the general acoustic of mechanical (as opposed to electrical) recordings: they always sound to me as if they were made with the performers stationed at the bottom of a very deep well, while the horn was positioned at the top!
The sound has been compared to that of a sardine tin! Recording's of singer's come off best! And,amazingly well,in my opinion! They're still not going to be everyone's cup of tea,though!
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