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1  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Individual composers / Re: John Adams (b.1947) on: July 27, 2021, 03:29:04 pm
I was at the world premiere of Doctor Atomic.  It blew me away!
2  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Individual composers / Re: Oleg Eiges (1905-1992) on: July 19, 2021, 02:45:38 pm
Many thanks for the replies above, especially for the piano concerto, which I much enjoyed. Especially the  slow movement, which seems to have stepped out of The Fiery Angel. But I have two principal questions:

1) What was so objectionable about his 10th symphony that aroused the ire of the censors and kiboshed his career? Did it set poems by Jewish poets?

2) Given the general interest in music that got censored in the 1940s, why has he seemingly never been rehabilitated, especially in the west?

I think a big part of the challenge of researching lost Soviet era composers is you have to have good language skills.  It's very possible there is much out there but not under his English name so it becomes difficult to know you're looking up the same person or if you would get more useful results in searching in Russian.  Secondly, depending on what region he's from, they might have their own version of spelling his name local to that region because they weren't all the same language but had dialects.  Sort of like how Вайнберг = Vaynberg = Weinberg = Vainberg depending if you're using Cyrillic Russian or Latinized Russian or Polish Russian or Polish, etc.  Of course, if the composer is prominent enough it becomes easier to know it's all the same person but not really if they are obscure. 
3  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Individual composers / Re: Oleg Eiges (1905-1992) on: July 14, 2021, 03:25:55 pm
I found his Piano Concerto here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lparUJx1rGs

He's not even in the Musicweb catalog of Soviet symphonies and concertos which includes lots of unknown composers.
4  MEMBERS' CORNER / Members' wish lists & requests / Re: Aaron Jay Kernis and other US symphonists on: July 10, 2021, 01:19:37 am
Kernis is yet another underrated US composer of symphonies, along with Harris, Creston, Piston, Adler, Bolcom, Rouse et al.
Whilst there are recordings of some symphonies by these composers, there is no comprehensive coverage of their works, let alone complete symphony sets in most cases.  Even ignoring the present Covid-related problems of recording and performing, there seems little interest within most US orchestras to promote their own symphonic legacies, so potential audiences are missing out on a glorious selection of music deserving of multiple hearings.

George Rochberg is also fantastic.  His Symphony No. 6 reminds me of Shostakovitch, Malcolm Arnold, and Bernard Herrmann.  A great cross sample of styles.  His symphonies are epic too, with no. 1 being 65 minutes.  American symphonies are excellent actually because it is a melting pot of ethnicity.  Sort of like how Mahler incorporated pastorals, beer tunes and funeral marches of his bohemian youth in his symphonies, the same was the case with American symphonies with jazz, french, Russian, film, etc., into tragic history.
5  MEMBERS' CORNER / Members' wish lists & requests / Re: Aaron Jay Kernis: Symphony of Meditations (Symphony no. 3) on: July 09, 2021, 01:05:15 am
All his music is very fine, dynamic, and very well conceived.  If you like Christopher Rouse or Lowell Liebermann, you'll find much to enjoy with Kernis.  His Symphonies No. 2 and 4 are also commercially available.
6  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: Your favourite ballet scores on: May 18, 2021, 01:24:08 am
My favorites might be Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake and Prokofiev's Cinderella. But I also like contemporary ballets like Goldethal's Othello and think Sir Peter Maxwell Davies Carolyne Mathilda is quite fine based on the suites.  Thomas Ades' Inferno is a exciting.  Guillaume Connesson's Lucifer as well.  I always have a soft spot for the original chamber version of Copland's Appellation Spring.  The three magnificent early ballets of Stravinsky. 

Never heard the Maxwell Davies!

 Smiley

This is the album I am referring to if you are able to track it down.  I so much wish I could hear John McCabe's Arthur's ballets in full (not just the symphony suite which I enjoy but the four hour entirety).

https://www.amazon.com/Peter-Maxwell-Davies-Caroline-Mathilde/dp/B00PO9AF84
7  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: Your favourite ballet scores on: May 17, 2021, 12:48:49 am
My favorites might be Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake and Prokofiev's Cinderella. But I also like contemporary ballets like Goldethal's Othello and think Sir Peter Maxwell Davies Carolyne Mathilda is quite fine based on the suites.  Thomas Ades' Inferno is a exciting.  Guillaume Connesson's Lucifer as well.  I always have a soft spot for the original chamber version of Copland's Appellation Spring.  The three magnificent early ballets of Stravinsky. 
8  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: What are you currently listening to? on: May 11, 2021, 01:45:46 am
This evening:



A wonderful performance all round with the great André Previn at his masterful best and glorious singing from the stellar trio of Sheila Armstrong, Robert Tear and John Shirley-Quirk. Ahh, those were the days...

It's a great piece, but Joseph Holbrooke's setting of the text knocks the spots off it in terms of capturing Poe's febrile imagination and translating it into music...

 Shocked

...and does it in half the time!

 Wink

Yeah, that's high praise and frankly Holbrooke doesn't hold up to that level of praise.  You are looking for a beat down here.  Rachmaninoff is hands down a far greater composer and The Bells is one of his greatest works. 
9  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Individual composers / Re: Favourite orchestral transcriptions on: April 16, 2021, 03:16:57 pm
I've done lots of orchestral transcriptions (orchestrations).  Here is my version of Rachmaninoff's Prelude in B minor, Op. 32, No. 10 for orchestra. 
https://clyp.it/1lkngwc0

I also did Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, Handel's Messiah (Worthy is the Lamb and Amen for romantic orchestra with organ), etc.  Bach really lends himself to arrangements because there are no dynamics or phrases indicated but they are implied so we "hear" phrases, dynamics, and all the moving lines and instruments.

10  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: Sergei Slonimsky: RIP on: March 16, 2021, 02:54:01 pm
As Saint Saens said,"I produce music like an apple tree produces apples".
This extremely gifted man produced music like a hundred apple trees. I never heard a piece I didn't like and every piece was an original.
A great loss, not sure what his last numbered symphony but perhaps somewhere around 32?

According to the link in OP, Slonimsky leaves 8 operas, 34 symphonies and a warehouse full of chamber music.
11  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: British and Irish Music on: March 12, 2021, 01:07:37 am
Wow, that's quite a collection!
12  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: British and Irish Music on: February 20, 2021, 01:35:11 am
Hi Albion, thanks for uploading but having trouble finding it.  Is it in the download section?

Yes, it's in the archive...

 Smiley

I'm an idiot then and try as I might, I can't find.  Can you please provide a link to it?
13  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: British and Irish Music on: February 19, 2021, 03:15:40 pm
Just added:

Hoddinott - Lizard, Concerto for Orchestra, Op.181 (2003)
BBC NOW/ Jac van Steen (24/1/2009, br. 18/2/2021)


This is from the second concert given at the newly-opened Hoddinott Hall in Cardiff.

"More poetry with Alun Hoddinott’s Lizard, of 2003. In 1995 Hoddinott wrote a set of four songs under the title Tymhorau (Seasons), setting texts by Gwyn Thomas, accomplished poet in both languages of Wales. The text he set for summer, was Thomas’s heat-filled poem which observes and evokes the sudden movements (and equally sudden stillnesses) of a lizard seen, in fierce sunlight, upon an ancient wall in Provence. Responding to a later commission from the BBC National Orchestra of Wales (in 2003), Hoddinott produced an extended (the piece lasts almost thirty minutes) orchestral response to the same poem. It would be wrong to think of the piece as straightforwardly programmatic – apart from anything else the twenty one short lines of Thomas’s poem alone would hardly fuel a piece of such length. But Hoddinott has clearly responded both to the poem’s contrast between suddenness and stillness and to Thomas’s use of musical metaphor within his text:

            It’s a lizard
            Come out
            To warm its blood in the sun.
            Small, mottled, stock-still
            With skin like tissue paper
            Respirating energy.
            Then a pizzicato
            Across the wall, across its sunlight:
            Another stop,
            Respires again.
            Then cranks on
            As in an old film.


Hoddinott’s score alternates faster and slower sections, in a relatively loose A-B-A-B-A structure and is built around two essential motifs, a pattern of triplets which ascends to a motif of fast repeated notes and, on the other hand, a group of five rhythmically pronounced semiquavers. At times one can ‘hear’ images from Thomas’s poem very clearly: some of the orchestral textures seeming to evoke, with some vividness the sensory juxtapositions of “sunlight, a lizard, a wall / An old, old wall” and some of the changes of tempo evocative of the abruptness of the lizard’s stoppings and startings. At other times, Hoddinott seems more concerned to explore the purely musical possibilities of his material, and the references to Thomas’s poem seem to (largely) disappear. The explicitly programmatic and the more ‘abstract’ elements aren’t perhaps always fully integrated, but this is certainly a very accomplished score and van Steen and his orchestra were certainly persuasive advocates for it, responsive to Hoddinott’s vivid contrasts of colour and sonority." (Seen and Heard International, Musicweb, January 2009)

Hi Albion, thanks for uploading but having trouble finding it.  Is it in the download section?
14  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Commercial recordings (vintage, new and forthcoming) / Re: Havergal Brian from Heritage on: February 13, 2021, 01:55:29 pm
This was a fabulous disc!  Excellent performance and interpretation. 
15  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Coming broadcasts and listen-later links / Re: Alun Hoddinott on: February 13, 2021, 01:54:32 pm
Thank you!
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