The Art-Music Forum
October 16, 2021, 01:06:36 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: A place to discover and discuss a wide range of composers and music (both familiar and forgotten), recordings, broadcasts, books and art. Register, contribute and explore!
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

  Show Posts
Pages: 1 [2] 3
16  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: United States Music on: April 03, 2015, 04:33:33 pm
I believe the actual story is that Koussevitzky had sensed that Schuman was strongly influenced by Harris in his early work, and after K. premiered Schuman's 3rd Symphony, he told the young composer: "Now you must learn to hate Harris!" It was K.s way of telling Schuman that he had to start developing his own voice. Which he most assuredly did! :-)
17  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Commercial recordings (vintage, new and forthcoming) / Re: New Duttons for December............... on: December 16, 2014, 03:38:19 pm
I note that the Brian issue will also have the Festal Dance - I hope Brabbins will include the quasi-concertante piano part that was omitted by Adrian Leaper in the Naxos recording.
18  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: Composer influenced by Holst on: April 16, 2014, 05:15:49 pm
Howard Hanson certainly mentioned Holst as an influence on his own music, if memory serves.
19  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Individual composers / Re: Malcolm Williamson (1931-2003) on: March 15, 2014, 01:57:40 am
I believe there were some reasons as to why those Chandos series hit the buffers - The Williamson series owing to Iceland's financial collapse a few years back (and consequently affecting the Iceland SO used for the sessions) and the Bennett series because of Richard Hickox's death.
As for Williamson himself, what I've heard of his has always left me wanting more, and with as big an output as his, there's plenty of his stuff out tehre waiting to be discovered.
Having acquired Piers Lane's new set of the Piano Concertos I can report that there's a great deal to enjoy - no.2 is an especially infectious creation. The late no.4 has a rather wonderful tune in the central movt., too.
First review I read was (alas) Norman Lebrecht on the Sinfini site - a typically condescending, damning-with-faint-praise piece which tends to be the sort of thing he does for any composer who has the temerity to spell his name something other than M-A-H-L-E-R. And as such, best ignored. The music, naturally, is another matter entirely!  Smiley
20  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Commercial recordings (vintage, new and forthcoming) / Re: Holst Choral Symphony from Chandos on: September 15, 2013, 02:34:17 pm
Haven't heard the Davis recording yet, and as I too am very happy with Boult, doing so is rather low on my list of priorities. But this did trigger a memory from a few years back, when I attended the Proms premiere of the Choral Symphony back in 2009 - David Atherton was the conductor, and I suspect this was originally one of Hickox's programmes before the Grim Reaper claimed him. For me, Atherton is a very underrated conductor, and he unquestionably "gets" Holst: had he been the conductor on this recording, I think the performers' response would have been much closer to what I heard in the RAH 4 years ago. The best moments were almost on a par with Sir Adrian (I recall an especially blistering Scherzo)..........
Oh well. May as well file under "missed opportunities" and stick with Boult..........
21  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: Music "For the Birds" on: September 08, 2013, 01:38:28 pm
Would Stravinsky's "The Owl and the Pussycat" half-qualify at the very least? From more recent times, John McCabe's double violin concerto "Les Martinets Noirs" (if someone else has already mentioned it, apologies). Also worth mentioning is Michael Finnissy's 3rd String Quartet, which makes extensive use of recordings of birdsong.
22  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Commercial recordings (vintage, new and forthcoming) / Re: Bliss "The Beatitudes" on: August 25, 2013, 01:48:10 am
Morton Gould comes to mind. Gunther Schuller, too. Barber caught the baton bug for a few years during the 1940s and early 1950s, and recorded 3 major works of his (Symphony 2, Cello Concerto [with Nelsova] and the Medea Suite), in performaces that still stack up quite respectably to my ears.
23  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: British and Irish Music on: July 27, 2013, 12:33:17 pm
Listening with huge enjoyment to David Matthews's new work "A Vision of the Sea"(many thanks to Maris for the recording Smiley with its mixture of Debussy, Britten and RVW, I read the extracts from the reviews in the British newspapers on his publisher's (Faber) website:

http://www.fabermusic.com/news/story/bbc-proms-reviews-of-david-matthewss-a-vision-of-the-sea.aspx?ComposerId=455

.....and THEN this:

http://5against4.com/2013/07/17/proms-2013-david-matthews-a-vision-of-the-sea-world-premiere/

The author is himself a composer(Simon Cummings). Read what he says, listen to the work and judge for yourselves Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Angry

I went to the performance and thoroughly enjoyed it: best thing I've heard from Matthews in years - evocative, atmospheric, a real sense of narrative drive, and a marvellous payoff at the end. Echoes of RVW, Britten and Debussy notwithstanding, Matthews is (and always has been) his own man, and there's nothing fake about his music.

Don't set any store by Cummings' dismissal - he operates from an entirely different (dare I say opposite) end of the spectrum, being as he is of the Birtwistle / Ferneyhough / James Dillon persuasion............ (I thought he was wildly off-target, but that's just my opinion! Grin)
24  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: British and Irish Music on: June 18, 2013, 03:49:57 am
Having heard the broadcast in question, I can confirm that it is indeed just 5 minutes long. A very beautiful 5 minutes, though.  Smiley
25  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: British and Irish Music on: April 26, 2013, 04:05:45 am
Many, many thanks for this fabulous trawl of prime Bennett. The perf. of the 1st Symphony also makes a fine memorial to Colin Davis, I feel. I only met Bennett a few times, but he taught both of my composition teachers (Paul Patterson, whom I studied with in London, and John Baur, whom I studied with in Memphis), so every time I met him he delighted in quipping that I was therefore his "grand-pupil"!
26  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Coming broadcasts and listen-later links / Re: Proms 2013 on: April 23, 2013, 07:21:15 pm
For all the ambivalence that the "cult of the centenary" can engender, I for one am not displeased to see George Lloyd peeking from behind the shoulder of a far more celebrated fellow centenarian from these shores: I believe he has been represented at the Proms only once before (Symphony 6 in 1981 under the much-missed Ted Downes, if memory serves).
27  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / Commercial recordings (vintage, new and forthcoming) / Re: The Critics as Idiots(Nielsen's Symphonies Nos. 2 and 3: LSO) on: March 11, 2013, 12:46:02 am
Either way, Robert Simpson would have had this bozo's guts for garters, and that's a fact!! Grin
28  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: The Dozen Most Neglected on CD Non-British 20th Century Symphonists on: February 20, 2013, 09:26:21 pm
Just thought of two more:

Krzysztof Meyer
Jean Rivier
29  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: The Dozen Most Neglected on CD Non-British 20th Century Symphonists on: February 20, 2013, 09:24:24 pm
If I may add a few extra names who might fit your criteria:

Henry Cowell
Leo Sowerby
Nikolai Karetnikov
Alemdar Karamanov
Mario Zafred (my only contact with his music was hearing his 8th Symphony while still a kid in Italy back in the 1970s)

I'm sure there are others out there; I may add a few more names should they come to mind.
30  MUSIC OF ALL ERAS / General musical discussion / Re: USA composers influenced by RVW on: February 20, 2013, 09:03:22 pm
Peter Mennin was strongly influenced by RVW: his early Folk Overture (1945) could almost be an offshoot from the last movt. of the older composer's 4th Symphony, and there are moments like that in much of his work from the 1940s (though the 3rd Symphony [1946] also has strong echoes of Walton 1 to my ears). Thomas Canning also comes to mind: his Fantasia on a theme of Justin Morgan (recorded by both Howard Hanson and Stokowski) could almost be the Tallis Fantasia transplanted to the US. I suspect William Schuman was also influenced by that work, if some of the string sonorities in his 3rd Symphony (1941) are any indication. In more recent times, Claude Baker quotes quite brazenly from RVW's 4th Symphony in his orchestral "The Glass Bead Game" (1982).
Slightly off-topic, Howard Hanson went on record mentioning Holst as one of the composers he felt he had been strongly influenced by.
Pages: 1 [2] 3
Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum


Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy