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16  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: United States Music on: November 06, 2015, 07:09:47 pm
Walter Piston: Symphony No. 4


from the collection of Karl Miller

Five different interpretations of Walter Piston's Symphony No. 4. 





Los Angeles Philharmonic

Daniel Lewis, conductor
[date unknown]
[/i]
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Lawrence Foster, conductor
Ravina 1984


New York Philharmonic
Elyakum Shapira, conductor
14 March 1965]


Minnesota Orchestra
Edo de Waart, conductor
[13 Sept. 1991]


Detroit Sympony Orchestra
Neemi Jarvi, conductor
[date unknown]
17  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: United States Music on: November 06, 2015, 07:02:32 pm
Music of Radie Britain


From the collection of Karl Miller





Lament
organist and violinist not known
this work is not in her bio-bibliography


Lasso of Time (1940)
Chorus and ensemble unknown

Lotusland (1972)
David Vanni, tenor/violinist, cellist, and pianist unknown

Nocturn(sic) (1934)
Studio Orchestra Broadcast on KFI Radio (Hollywood)

Nocturn (1934)
Amarillo Symphony Orchestra
A Clyde Roller
[22 February, 1955]


Pastorale for Two Pianos (1939)
pianists unknown

Prelude to a Drama (1928)
Burbank Symphony Orchestra
Leo Damani
[9 October 1949]


Prison(Lament) (1935)
Richard Czerwonky, violin
John Wiederhorn, piano
[5 November 1935]


Saturnale (1939)
United States Air Force Orchestra
Col. George Howard
[19 Feb 1957]


Canyon (1939)
Eastman-Rochester Symphony Orchestra
Howard Hanson
[23 October 1945]


Serenade (1942)
Sigrid von Eicke, soprano
pianist unknown


Solitudine [ Italian version of Stillness]{1940]
Wendell Noble, baritone
Pianist unknown


Southern Symphony (1935) III Rhumbando
Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra
Richard Czerwonky
[24 June 1940]

Stillness
Wendell Noble, baritone
pianist unknown


Suite for Strings (1940)
Nostaliga
Serenade
Consecration
Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra
Howard Hanson
[23 October 1945]


Cactus Rhapsody (1953)
United States Air Force Symphony Orchestra
Captain John F. Yesulatis
[4 April 1960]


Cosmic Mist Symphony (1962)
In the Beginning
Nebula
Nuclear Fission
University of Houston Symphony Orchestra
A. Clyde Roller
[18 APril 1967]


Cowboy Rhapsody(1956)
Amarillo Symphony Orchestra
A. Clyde Roller
[11 April 1956]


Goddess of Inspiration (1948)
Sigrid von Eicke, soprano
unknown pianist.


Heroic Poem(1948)
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
Henry Sopkin
[11 March 1956]



Composer Biography from the Texas State Historical Association

BRITAIN, RADIE (1899–1994). Radie Britain, one of the most successful Texas-born composers of symphonic music in the twentieth century, was born near Silverton, Texas, on March 17, 1899, the daughter of Edgar Charles and Katie (Ford) Britain. By 1905 the family had moved to a ranch near Clarendon, and Radie studied piano at Clarendon College. Even though the family later moved to Amarillo, Radie remained in Clarendon to finish high school and the music curriculum offered there. After high school she studied one year at Crescent College near Eureka Springs, Arkansas. Her early studies were with European-trained teachers who recognized her superior talents and predicted success for her in the music world. In the fall of 1919 she enrolled at the American Conservatory in Chicago, where she studied piano with Heniot Levy. She completed her B.M. degree in 1921. She then spent a year (1921–22) as music teacher at Clarendon College and set up her own teaching studio in Amarillo (1922–23), saving as much money as possible for a trip to Europe for further study. During the summer of 1922 she studied in Dallas with the organist Pietro Yon.

Britain made her first trip to Europe during the summer of 1923. She settled in Paris, where she studied organ with Marcel Dupré. After another year teaching privately in Amarillo, she set her sights on Germany. She moved to Berlin and studied piano with Adele aus der Ohre (1924), but soon moved to Munich to study with Albert Noelte (1924–26), who encouraged her to pursue composition seriously. She had her first compositions published there and made a successful debut as a composer in May 1926. The death of her younger sister in Amarillo forced Britain to return to the U.S., but she continued studying with Noelte in Chicago (1926–27), where he had moved. Britain herself moved to Chicago permanently to teach with Noelte at Girvin Institute of Music and Allied Arts.

During these years she began to compose orchestral works, the genre that produced her greatest successes. Her training as an organist gave her insights as an orchestrator, and she began to produce a long series of programmatic orchestral works in the tradition of German post-romanticism. Her Heroic Poem (1929) was inspired by Charles Lindbergh's flight and won the Juilliard National Publication Prize in 1930. With the help of her mentor Noelte and encouragement from the Federal Music Project, her works were played by symphony orchestras all over the country during the next decade.

Her first husband, Leslie Edward Moeller, was a Chicago businessman with little interest in his wife's career. They married in June 1930, and Britain's only child, Lerae, was born in 1932. An older woman composer, Amy Beach, made it possible for Britain to spend the summers of 1935 and 1936 at the famed MacDowell Colony. During the 1930s Britain fell in love with the Italian sculptor Edgardo Simone (1889–1949). After divorcing her first husband in 1939 she moved to California and married Simone in 1940. After Simone's death Britain married Theodore Morton, an aviation pioneer, in 1959. Morton died in 1993.

In 1941 Britain settled in Hollywood, where she taught piano and composition and continued a distinguished career as a composer. She is undoubtedly the most honored Texas composer in history. More than fifty of her works received international or national awards. She was given an honorary doctorate by the Musical Arts Conservatory in Amarillo in 1958. Throughout her career she maintained a connection to her native Southwest. One of her first published piano pieces in Munich was Western Suite (1925), and she returned to her roots many times for inspiration and titles. Among her orchestral works are Southern Symphony (1935), Drouth (1939), Paint Horse and Saddle (1947), Cowboy Rhapsody (1956), and Texas (1987). Similar titles can be found in her piano, vocal, and chamber music works.

For decades Radie Britain was associated with the National League of American Pen Women. She wrote numerous articles in magazines and journals. In 1959 she wrote an unpublished autobiographical novel, Bravo, based on her relationship with Edgardo Simone. Her other published writings include Major and Minor Moods (1970), a collection of autobiographical and inspirational short stories; Composer's Corner (1978), a collection of her articles from National Pen Women Magazine; and Ridin' Herd to Writing Symphonies: an Autobiography (1996), a fascinating memoir published posthumously. Britain died on May 23, 1994, in Palm Desert, California.

Collections of Radie Britain's music, published and manuscript, are housed in several locations: the Amarillo Public Library; the American Music Center in New York; the Edwin A. Fleisher Collection of Orchestral Music in Philadelphia; the Moldenhauer Collection at Harvard University; the Texas Composers Collection at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin; and the Radie Britain Collection in the UCLA Music Library's Archival Collection. The composer's original music scores, manuscripts, and tapes are at the Indiana University School of Music. The Radie Britain Papers (scrapbooks, letters, programs, notes, newspaper articles, citations, and photos) are housed at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin.












18  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: United States Music on: November 06, 2015, 06:56:35 pm
Music of Kevin Kaska

From the collection of Karl Miller


Triple Concerto (World Premiere)

I Allegro con passione
II Larghetto
III Vivace brioso

Eroica Trio (Adela Peña, violin/Sara Sant' Ambrogio, cello/Erika Nickrenz, piano)
St Louis Symphony Orchestra
Hans Vonk
[9/10 November 2001
]

Knights of the Red Branch (Triple Harp Concerto)
The Ride
Lament
The Return
Catherine Barretr, Jeannie Norton, Paula Page, harps
Doctors Orchestra of Houston
Libi Lebel
[19 November 2005]


BSO 2000 Famfare

Written for the Boston Symphony Orchestra

The Golden Falcon
An Egyption folk tale for children

Fratternal Journey

Commissioned by the Scottish Rite Freemasons
Milenium 2000 Symphony Orchestra
James Orent, conductor


American Rhapsody #1
Modesto Symphony Orchestra
Michael Krajewski, conductor


The Wizard of Menlo Park
An Address on Thomas Edison for Narrator and Orchestra

Alivin Epstein, actor
Cliff Schorer text

Fanfare for the New Millineum
Old South Brass

Heroic Entry
Old South Brass

Hymn of Praise
Old South Brass

My Country Phillipines
Lauron Ildefonso, flute
Boston Pops Orchestra
John Williams, conductor


I'm Glad there is you.

19  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: United States Music on: November 06, 2015, 06:49:50 pm
Music of Lukas Foss


from the collection of Karl Miller



Gift of the Magi- Suite from the Ballet

Suite from the Opera Grifflekin
  • Devils
  • Ballad
  • Piano Deviltry (James Kohn, piano)
  • On Earth (Dawn)
  • Song of the Fountain Statue
  • Toyshop Parade
  • Chase
[/i]

Behold, I Build a House


Source LP:
KM 14002
University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Choral Union
Carl Chapman, conductor
Oshkosh Symphony Orchestra
Henri B. Pensis, conductor
1986



20  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: Italian Music on: November 06, 2015, 06:45:02 pm
Amfitheatrof Piano Concerto (1936)


From the collection of Karl Miller


Details of performance are unknown.



You are also encourged to check out these interested tidbits from his movie career.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9d-bEm_50eU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ra9N_PKaMmI



Wikipedia Bio


Daniele (Alexandrovich) Amfitheatrof (Russian: Даниил Александрович Амфитеатров, October 29, 1901 in Saint Petersburg, Russia – June 4, 1983 in Venice, Italy) was a Russian-born Italian-naturalised composer and conductor.

Contents

    1 Early life
    2 Composer and conductor
    3 Arrival in the United States of America
    4 Hollywood
    5 Final years
    6 Selected filmography
    7 References
    8 External links

Early life

Amfitheatrof was born in Saint Petersburg, into a family that was distinguished in various areas of the arts and culture. His father, Aleksander Amfiteatrov, was a noted writer. His mother Illaria (née Sokoloff), an accomplished singer and pianist, had studied privately with Rimsky-Korsakov.

The composer's early life was one of extreme hardship. In January 1902, at the age of three months, he was removed to Siberia, where his father was imprisoned for publishing anti-Tsarist articles. In 1904 the authorities returned the family to St. Petersburg, after which time they emigrated to Italy.

At the age of six, Daniele commenced private music studies with his mother. In 1914 he was accepted as a student by Ottorino Respighi in Rome. Shortly thereafter, however, the family returned to Russia, where Alexander Amfitheatrof was appointed as political advisor to Alexander Kerensky during the few months that he was Prime Minister prior to the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917. In spite of the political and social upheavals of the time, young Daniele received formal instruction in harmony under Nikolai Shcherbachov and Jāzeps Vītols at the Petrograd Conservatory between 1916 and 1918. In 1921, he was permitted to travel to Prague, Czechoslovakia for further study in counterpoint under Jaroslav Kricka.

After four years of ongoing hardships, the Amfitheatrof family escaped from Soviet Russia. Their perilous crossing through the Gulf of Finland was made in the dead of night. The family returned to Italy in the spring of 1922. Daniele became a naturalised Italian citizen and resumed his formal music training under Respighi. He received his diploma in composition from the Royal Conservatory of Santa Cecilia in Rome in 1924.
Composer and conductor

Following his graduation, Amfitheatrof took his place in Italian music circles of the day. In 1924 he was appointed pianist, organist, and assistant choral conductor of the Augusteo Symphony of Rome. Successive appointments included a position as the artistic director of the Italian Radio in Genoa and Trieste (1929–1932), as well as the management of RAI in Turin, where he also conducted many symphony concerts, choral works and operas at the Teatro di Torino (1932–1937). He also travelled extensively throughout Europe, conducting many of the leading orchestras there. Amfitheatrof's success as a composer in his own right was assured early on in his professional career by performances of his concert works, including Poema del Mare (1925), Miracolo della Rose (1926) and Christmas Rhapsody for Organ and Orchestra (1928) and American Panorama (1933). Later, he composed his first film score for Max Ophüls' La Signora di tutti (1934).
Arrival in the United States of America

Following the premiere of his programmatic work American Panorama (1935), which was conducted by Dimitri Mitropoulos in Turin in 1937, Amfitheatrof was invited by the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra to a position as Mitropoulos's associate for the first two months of the 1937-1938 concert season. Amfitheatrof arrived in the United States with his wife (née May C Semenza), his son, Erik (b. 1931), and daughter, Stella Renata (b. 1934), at New York Harbour on October 21, 1937. His arrival was noted in the New York papers.

Amfitheatrof's busy schedule with the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra included concerts in regional Minnesota and the Province of Manitoba. His appearances were well liked by audiences and received much favourable press.

Amfitheatrof also accepted a brief engagement with the Boston Symphony Orchestra at the behest of their conductor, Serge Koussevitsky, in 1938.
Hollywood

With World War II imminent in Europe, Amfitheatrof elected to remain in the United States. He relocated his family to California on the recommendation of Boris Morros, then director of music at Paramount Pictures. Amfitheatrof was hired by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios under an exclusive four-year contract (1939–1943). His scores at MGM include those for Lassie Come Home, the first major film of a young Elizabeth Taylor. During his twenty-six years in Hollywood, where he was employed by each of the major studios at one time for another, he composed the scores (often uncredited) for over fifty films, including Letter from an Unknown Woman, The Desert Fox, The Naked Jungle, The Last Hunt, and The Mountain.[1] His final score was written for Major Dundee in 1965. (This score, which was disliked by many, including director Sam Peckinpah, was replaced with a new score by Christopher Caliendo for the reconstructed version, which was released theatrically in 2005; both scores can be heard on the DVD, released later that year).

Amfitheatrof was twice nominated for an Oscar, for his work on Guest Wife and Song of the South.

Amfitheatrof once remarked in written correspondence (citation: private letters) with his friend and colleague, John Steven Lasher, that his career in Hollywood "as a prostitute composer" ultimately tarnished his image as a professional musician. As a result, he was unable to secure commissions or performances of his concert works.
Final years

Amfitheatrof returned to Italy in 1959 and lived there for the most part until 1967. He made frequent visits to the United States during the final fifteen years of his life. Plans to secure funding for a stage musical called The Staring Match, the production of a film, and the completion of a cello concerto, were all doomed to failure. His final years were spent in relative seclusion in Venice and in Rome, where he died on June 4, 1983.
21  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: Russian and Soviet Music on: September 03, 2015, 03:47:14 pm
Under the "United States" composers downloads, I post a collection of Karl Miller's tracks of American Pianist Byron Janis's interpretations of Prokofiev's Third Piano concerto and Tchaikovsky's first.  Enjoy.
22  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: German Music on: September 03, 2015, 03:46:16 pm
Under the "United States" composers downloads, I post a collection of Karl Miller's tracks of American Pianist Byron Janis's interpretation of  Richard Strauss's Burlesque.  Enjoy.
23  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: Polish Music on: September 03, 2015, 03:45:10 pm
Under the "United States" composers downloads, I post a collection of Karl Miller's tracks of American Pianist Byron Janis's interpretations of some Chopin Mazurkas.  Enjoy.
24  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: French music on: September 01, 2015, 01:19:17 pm
I just posted Milhaud's Salade and a collection of works by Jean Michel Damase in the downloads section. Happy Hunting!
25  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: Czech Music on: September 01, 2015, 01:17:10 pm
I just posted Karel Husa's Concerto for Orchestra from Karl's Collection.  He was technically an American citizen by then, so I flipped an coin, and heads put him in the Czech composer section!
26  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: Israeli Music on: September 01, 2015, 12:54:54 pm
I've just posted 6 works by different Israeli composers from Karl's collection.
27  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: United States Music on: August 28, 2015, 09:20:25 pm
For what its worth, I've just posted a handful of works by different American composers from the bottomless archive of Karl Miller.  Enjoy-- and let me know if I've screwed something up.
28  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: United States Music on: August 26, 2015, 08:10:21 pm
[size=24]Music of Irving Fine[/size]



From the collection of Karl Miller


Symphony (1962)
New York Philharmonic
Leonard Bernstein, Conductor
October 27/31, 1966


From other public sources...

Toccata Concertante (1947)
Serious Song, Lament for String Orchestra (1955)
Boston Symphony Orchestra diretta da Erich Leinsdorf

Bio from the Irving Fine Society

Irving Fine (1914-1962) was an American composer with a remarkable gift for lyricism, whose masterfully crafted scores inevitably "sing." Aaron Copland wrote that his music "wins us over through its keenly conceived sonorities and its fully realized expressive content," praising it for "elegance, style, finish and a convincing continuity." Virgil Thomson cited an "unusual melodic grace."

Fine's initial training was in piano and he became a skilled pianist, admired by colleagues for his superior sightreading ability. Composition and theory studies were with Walter Piston and Edward Burlingame Hill at Harvard University, and with Nadia Boulanger in France and at Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Massachusetts. In addition, Fine studied choral conducting with Archibald T. Davison at Harvard and orchestral conducting with Serge Koussevitzky, at Tanglewood. At Harvard, where he became a close associate of Copland, Stravinsky, Koussevitzky and Leonard Bernstein, he taught theory and music history from 1939 to 1950; and at Brandeis University he taught composition and theory from 1950 to 1962. Fine also conducted the Harvard Glee Club, and for nine summers between 1946 and 1957 taught composition at the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood. At Brandeis he was Walter W. Naumburg Professor of Music and chairman of the School of Creative Arts. He suffered a fatal heart attack in Boston on August 23, 1962, leaving incomplete Maggie (based on the Stephen Crane novel), a musical he was writing in collaboration with composer Richard Wernick; he had also begun a violin concerto, commissioned by the Ford Foundation. Among Fine's honors were two Guggenheim Fellowships, a Fulbright Research Fellowship, a National Institute of Arts and Letters award, and a New York Music Critics' Circle award.

An examination of Fine's small but estimable output reveals a composer who was a perfectionist on the order of Copland and Stravinsky. His works are carefully calculated and detailed, their ever-increasing emphasis on melody tellingly allied with rhythmic suppleness, clean-sounding textures, and unobtrusive but integral counterpoint.

As an artist Fine was eclectic, but in the best sense: assimilative yet individual. The influence of neoclassical Stravinsky and eighteenth-century forms is pervasive in much of his early music, along with what proved to be a lifelong attachment to romantic expression. The 1946 Sonata for Violin and Piano was accurately described by the composer as being in an idiom "essentially tonal, diatonic, moderately dissonant, neoclassic in its formal approach." Fine's neoclassicism, nurtured early on by Nadia Boulanger, is apparent even in the movement-titles of pieces such as the 1947 Music for Piano and the 1948 Partita for Wind Quintet (for instance, "Variations," "Gigue," "Waltz-Gavotte"). However, the ebulliently rhythmic Toccata Concertante for Orchestra of 1947 — which has, wrote the composer, "a certain affinity with the energetic music of the Baroque concertos" — stands as the most full-blown example of neoclassic Fine.

Subsequently, romanticism claimed pride of place, and in the elegantly bittersweet Notturno for Strings and Harp (1951), the harmonically diverse song-cycle Mutability (1952), and the austerely elegiac Serious Song: Lament for String Orchestra (1955) the result was a more intense lyricism. With such works he proved himself capable of writing melody which, as he once noted admiringly of another composer, "gives real pleasure to lots of people without being commonplace." It is not surprising that Notturno and Serious Song are the most frequently played of Fine's orchestral compositions. (Also programmed often are his highly idiomatic, unfailingly lyric and varied choral works —Alice in Wonderland, The Hour-Glass, The Choral New Yorker.)

The final development in Fine's aesthetic was his utilization of twelve-tone technique, initially in the eloquent, intense String Quartet of 1952, then in the pellucid Fantasia for String Trio of 1956, culminating in what was to be his last work, the dramatic Symphony of 1962. His interest in serialism had been stimulated by the example of Stravinsky and Copland, and like his elder colleagues he was able to use dodecaphonic method freely and subordinate it to his personal musical ideals. Fine's serially inflected scores have tonal centers, and also the formal and textural clarity, the sense of control, and the rhythmic potency of his earlier pieces. Copland described the symphony, the composer's most ambitious work, as being "almost operatic in gesture," and its urgent rhythmic polyphony, declamatory rhetoric and considerable dissonance quotient marked a new plateau in Fine's creative evolution — one that must forever intrigue as both a beginning and an end.

29  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: United States Music on: June 25, 2015, 12:57:31 pm
Music of John Haussermann


From the collection of Karl Miller


The After Christmas Suite (1934)
Manilla Symphony Orchestra
Dr. Herbert Zipper, conductor


Symphony No 2 Op. 6 (1937-8)
( Movements 3 and 4  only)
NBC Symphony Orchestra
William Steinberg, Conductor
[28 May, 1939]


Symphony No. 3(1947)
Cincinatti Symphony Orchestra
Thor Johnson, conductor
[1 April 1949]


Pastoral Fantasy for Flute, Harp and String Orch. Op 5a (1939)
Anna Sacchi, harp;
Murray Graitzer flute;
Phil Sims String Orchestra
Jettie J. Denmark, conductor
[16 April 1939]



Concerto for Voice and Orchestra, Op. 25 (1942)
Margo Rehert (sp?) soprano,
Cincinnatti Symphony Orchestra
Sir Eugene Goossens, conductor
[24 April 1942]


From another source....

Morning Concert: The Music of John Haussermann
Radio Show
KPFA-FM
July 2, 1980
From the Other Minds Archive

About the composer from Archive.Org

One of the most unusual and inspiring stories in modern American music is that of composer John Haussermann. Born in 1909, to a wealthy family then living in Manila, Haussermann studied music at the Cincinnati Conservatory (1924–27) and at Colorado College, before going to Paris in 1930 to study organ with Marcel Dupré. While in Paris he became friends with Maurice Ravel and began serious study of composition with Paul Le Flem. Active in the Cincinnati area from the 1930s to the 1950s, he was the founder of the Contemporary Concert series in Cincinnati. In 1967 he moved to San Francisco where he was to reside until his death in 1986. An encouraging example to many others who live with a physical disability, Haussermann was born with cerebral palsy and was later confined to a wheelchair after being in a car accident, and yet he composed for decades in all media from chamber music to orchestral with the aid of a music secretary. In this program you will here some rare early recordings of his music, including the world premiere of perhaps his most famous composition the “Concerto for Voice and Orchestra, Op. 25”.


Note: There was a radio show in 1981 as part of the Disability Radio Arts Project.  Currently, its stored on reel to reel, but not available digitally.  If anyone wishes to pay the cost of a transfer, they will make it digitally--

http://www.pacificaradioarchives.org/recording/az0591





30  DOWNLOADS ARRANGED BY NATIONALITY / Downloads: discussion without links should be posted here, for the access of both members and non-members alike / Re: French music on: June 24, 2015, 04:17:42 pm
Explore the Crystal Clear S0und of Sonotape SW 1005
I've also posted this under Mexican and Russian nationalities! 


From the collection of Karl Miller



This is an interesting find- a transfer a commercial Reel to Reel Tape issued in the 1950s, with a lively cross section of 20th Century Music. Anything with Iron Foundry and Sensemaya has to be good! I'm pretty sure  the image above is of the source of  Karl's transfer.

If you paid 60 cents in November of 1956 for your new copy of High Fidelity, you would have found the following review.

 

Not the friendliest review but with a 15 inch  per second source tape, as opposed to a worn LP, you will really get some very good sound from recordings that are more than 60 years old.    From what I  can guess, the "study in percussion" may have been something whipped up by the engineers to show off the speakers in your bachelor pad,  as it was not released on vinyl. It was probably created  to show off the "crystal clear" sound of tape, and maybe to rival your collection of Martin Denny Exotica albums.






As you download this file, I'd suggest getting out your martini shaker, and pour drinks for two.






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