The Art-Music Forum

MUSIC OF ALL ERAS => General musical discussion => Topic started by: kyjo on January 01, 2013, 05:39:53 am



Title: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 01, 2013, 05:39:53 am
Happy New Year everyone!

My discovery of the year (which I just got done listening to) is Albert Hurwit's (b. 1931) Symphony no. 1 Remembrance, available on this Msr CD:
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ZBA4SX9AL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

This glorious hour-long symphony is written in a late-romantic style with minimal dissonance. It is somewhat like good film music (that is not a pejorative description in my book!) and is truly an uplifting, inspiring piece. The symphony has a story behind it involving the tragedies and triumphs of mankind (specifically Hurwit's family) that, when taken into account when listening, is quite moving. It is written in four movements: I: Origins; II: Separation; III: Remembrance; IV: Arrival. The first movement begins quietly with quarter notes in the timpani. The violins introduce the simple, but noble main theme. The secondary theme is astonishingly beautiful, almost Elgarian in its nobilmente grandeur. The second movement begins violently, but the mood lightens and a klezmer band is introduced, representing Hurwitz's Jewish heritage. This movement was my least favorite and didn't seem to fit with the late-romantic style of the other movements. Still, I found the incorporation of a klezmer band interesting. The third movement is a deeply lyrical adagio that becomes almost Mahlerian at points in its intense beauty. It reaches a magnificent climax and then dies back down. The fourth movement begins with a pulsating rhythm in the violins that seems to be in 5/8 time. The brass soon enter with a fanfare-like motif, after which follows a contrapuntal treatment of a Jewish folk song. A kaleidoscope of melodies and motifs is soon presented, including a waltz-like theme and a reappearance of the klezmer band from the second movement. Before long, the main theme from the first movement is heard again, but is subject to variation until, in a blaze of glory, the nobilmente secondary theme from the first movement makes a goose bump-raising return. The pulsating main theme of the movement returns, and the brass fanfares lead us back to the home key of C major, in an ending that invigorates me for the new year to come!

Sorry about all that ranting! It was just such a great piece. The Bulgarian National Radio SO (why do they need a Bulgarian orchestra to do American music, especially wonderful works like this?) under Michael Lankester does an admirable job in this music. This symphony is all the more amazing since Hurwit cannot read or write music and Lankester served as his mentor, helping him to organize his thoughts and bring them to life. Unfortunately, it doesn't appear that Hurwitz has written anything else. He is such a talented composer! Read all about this fascinating story here: http://www.alberthurwit.com/
...and, most importantly, BUY THE CD!!! If the enthusiastic reviews on Amazon don't convince you, nothing will: http://www.amazon.com/Hurwit-Symphony-No-1-Remembrance-Albert/dp/B0007U3JS8/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1357017120&sr=1-1&keywords=hurwit

Shutting up now ;D

So, what to members here think their Discovery of the Year was? Please share :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on January 01, 2013, 05:51:50 am
Intriguing :)

.....but bed beckons-its 5.50am in the U.K. ::)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 01, 2013, 06:00:29 am
You should check it out, Colin (PM says more ;D)!

It's 1:00 AM here in the states...I should really be getting to bed also ;D


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on January 01, 2013, 10:03:01 am
Reasonable little 'taster' of the Hurwit on his website !

My discovery of the year ? The music library in Birmingham (England !) - before you mock, may even be the only such facility left in these islands (would be most happy to learn of any other)  - free to join, & allowing me to find that I did like Robert Simpson, Gavin Bryars et al (yes, even bits of Scelsi); now closed for 9 months to be re-housed in a smart new home !

Sorry, Mr. Kyjo - probably not quite what you had in mind for your thread, but if you're asking for perception-altering discoveries.... !

Happy New Year to all.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Elroel on January 01, 2013, 11:57:08 am
Since You asked, Kyjo, telling about my greatest musical find, depends on the time you ask it.  May I instead give one of my highlights of the year:

The discovering of the UC-Forum and the continuation on the A-M F!

And for all: A Happy 2013

Elroel


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jim on January 01, 2013, 12:19:37 pm
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61YWr30S8kL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

My discovery of 2012 was this disc of chamber music by Peter Hope. These are exquisitely crafted pieces, and from the start it is amazing how he gets such a full sound from sparse forces. Peter Hope is well known as a light music composer and arranger - one of his most popular arrangements being 'Mexican Hat Dance'. Since 2000 he has concentrated on more serious compositions.

More information can be found on his web site: http://www.peterhopemusic.co.uk/
And the disc on Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Peter-Hope-Songs-Chamber-Music/dp/B000TWI7SQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357041243&sr=8-1


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: logeny on January 01, 2013, 01:29:33 pm
Hmm - Have owned the Hurwit for some time but have not listened more than once.  I recall thinking the music was repetitive - but on the basis of the recommendation I will give it another go, for sure.

So many discoveries in 2012 - too numerous to catalog.  But here are two which are at the top of the classical totem pole around here:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41-fntktHlL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51UE4yroOWL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

I introduced the Raykhelson disc on another thread.  The Giannini chamber music is amazing (see also his Piano Concerto on Naxos for another New Year's treat).


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: tapiola on January 01, 2013, 02:14:03 pm
Walter Braunfels.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 01, 2013, 05:01:21 pm
Sorry, Mr. Kyjo - probably not quite what you had in mind for your thread, but if you're asking for perception-altering discoveries.... !

That's quite alright, Clive. Any discovery relating to music made last year is welcome to be mentioned in this thread :)

Roelof's greatest discovery, the discovery of UC and now this forum, is shared by myself and many others here. Without the generous contributions of our members, we wouldn't be able to make so many great discoveries :)

Thanks, Jim, for the recommendation of the Peter Hope disc. For some reason, it has slipped under my radar ::)

Logeny, I can see why you might think the Hurwit is a bit repetitive, but please give it another try :) I also greatly enjoyed those Raykhelson and Giannini discs-wonderful, thoroughly romantic music written well into the 20th, and, in the case of Raykhelson, 21st centuries :) As those who know my musical tastes could probably guess, I love Giannini's PC ;D

Braunfels is another wonderful composer who has been getting a mini-revival as of late. Quite recently, the Oehms disc with his Organ Concerto was released, and CPO is planning to release a disc with his Sinfonia Concertante for violin, viola, two horns and string orchestra and a string orchestral version of his String Quintet :)

Thanks for all of your replies :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: shamus on January 01, 2013, 10:22:37 pm
For me it is still Marie Jaell's two piano concertos. On the other forum I was chided for listing two items, so feel safer saying so here. Beautiful full, romantic well worked out and cogent music, loved them, loved them. Oh, and just about everything else I have heard new, especially on this wonderful forum. Take care, Jim


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 01, 2013, 10:49:58 pm
Agreed, Jim-the Jaell concertos are lovely :) Compact, tuneful works that would be prime candidates for Hyperion's RPC series, I would think!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: David Carter on January 02, 2013, 01:27:53 pm
Albion's British Music Archive - Within which perhaps Fricker has been the newest and most impressive discovery.

In addition I made a deliberate plan in 2012 to "discover" the "Great" composers whom (aside from Beethoven and a limited amount of Bach) I have asiduously avoided as old, boring and irrelevant. And of these "Greats" the greatest discovery has been the rest of Bach. Hardly a dud in the whole 2000+ BMWs. The cantatas and the organ music have been a particular joy.

Other "Great" conposers have largely confirmed my earlier decision!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on January 02, 2013, 05:35:19 pm
Glad you are enjoying Fricker :)

One of my favourite but now totally ignored British composers.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: JimL on January 02, 2013, 05:37:46 pm
Maybe it's no great shakes, but I love a good violin concerto, and the recent discovery of the one by Ignatz Waghalter, on Naxos, is just such a one.  It's kind of like a more compact take on the Karlowicz (with which it shares many features), but striking in its own right.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 02, 2013, 07:56:21 pm
Albion's British Music Archive
Indeed, David-what a treasure trove of unsung goodies! We are very fortunate to have so much of Fricker's music in the Archive when he has been so criminally neglected on disc! Fricker's music may seem a bit "difficult" at first, but subsequent listenings truly reveal a composer of great substance. Fricker isn't the only composer who has been so well representing in the Archive-plenty of Daniel Jones, William Wordsworth, Iain Hamilton, Havergal Brian etc. can be found there also :)

Glad you could count composers as different as Bach and Fricker as your two greatest discoveries, David :)

Yes, Jim, the Waghalter VC is quite lovely-comparable to the Karlowicz and even Korngold VCs IMO! He has an excellent website dedicated to him: http://www.waghalter.com/ I'd really like to hear his Symphony in B minor, op. 6, but I seem to recall that it may be lost :(


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 02, 2013, 11:22:18 pm
Thanks to UC i approached to contemporary netherlands composer.IMHO one of the most impressive works on WWII is Orthel's Third :

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_250/MI0001/165/MI0001165786.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 02, 2013, 11:36:37 pm
Agreed, Toby! Orthel's powerful music certainly merits more attention than it has been getting. Fortunately, between the Etcetera disc and the downloads available here, we have access to all of Orthel's six symphonies and some other works of his :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: albert on January 03, 2013, 09:44:08 am
My discovery of the year is Henry Rabaud Symphony n.2 (Timpani).
A fine "grand" (I do not know if I may to say great) late French Romantic Symphony, by a youngster, previously known to me only through relatively short pieces.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: David Carter on January 03, 2013, 01:47:42 pm
Albion's British Music Archive
Indeed, David-what a treasure trove of unsung goodies! We are very fortunate to have so much of Fricker's music in the Archive when he has been so criminally neglected on disc! Fricker's music may seem a bit "difficult" at first, but subsequent listenings truly reveal a composer of great substance. Fricker isn't the only composer who has been so well representing in the Archive-plenty of Daniel Jones, William Wordsworth, Iain Hamilton, Havergal Brian etc. can be found there also :)

Glad you could count composers as different as Bach and Fricker as your two greatest discoveries, David :)

I'm intrigued Kyjo by how you would define "a bit difficult" but think I understand. I guess Parry/Sullivan would be "easy", Fricker "a bit difficult", Birtwistle "Very Difficult" and Ferneyhough on a different planet altogether. The music I enjoy most would put Birtwistle/Ferneyhough at the easiest point and Parry/Sullivan at the most difficult and Schuman on an entirely different planet (along with Eianuldi (or however you spell his name)).

**Generalisation alert.**
As to the Bach/Fricker thing it's been an observation of mine over many years  now that people at the cutting edge of contemporary music usually pay a great deal of homage to Bach and Beethoven but not so much to the other "Great" composers. There is something about LVB and JSB which has always inspired every new generation of contemporary composers no matter how far removed their own music sounds.

**2nd major generalisation alert**
In Broad terms music is only worth listenting to if it's Beethoven backwards or Charles Ives forward all the stuff in between is just dull.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 03, 2013, 08:08:19 pm
I'm intrigued Kyjo by how you would define "a bit difficult" but think I understand.
Fricker's music was "a bit difficult" to me at first mainly because it has very little "surface glimmer" and does not give up its secrets as easily as, say, George Lloyd (another fine British composer roughly contemporary with Fricker). However, with repeated listenings, I began to appreciate and enjoy his music more :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cilgwyn on January 03, 2013, 08:52:46 pm
I'm intrigued Kyjo by how you would define "a bit difficult" but think I understand.
Fricker's music was "a bit difficult" to me at first mainly because it has very little "surface glimmer" and does not give up its secrets as easily as, say, George Lloyd (another fine British composer roughly contemporary with Fricker). However, with repeated listenings, I began to appreciate and enjoy his music more :)
I must admit I've never heard anyone compare George Lloyd with Fricker before! But there's always a first time! :)
A bit of a tough nut to crack that George Lloyd!!! ;D


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 03, 2013, 09:13:03 pm
Oh, I was just trying to think of a British composer roughly contemporary with Fricker whose music has immediate appeal (as opposed to Fricker's music needing multiple listens to fully appreciate), so I chose Lloyd. Two quite different but equally wonderful composers!

Glad to hear the Rabaud Symphony no. 2 was your discovery, Alberto :) It's a big, very well-written late-romantic piece that would appeal to anyone (myself included) who enjoys the music of D'Indy, Magnard, Chausson, Ropartz, Lazzari, Franck and other French symphonists from that period. I'm rather surprised my post announcing the release of that Timpani disc didn't attract more attention here!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on January 03, 2013, 09:48:02 pm
If you are looking for composers contemporary with Fricker-ie composers born within three years of his birth date of 1920-then I could mention:

1917: Richard Arnell; John Gardner
1920: Geoffrey Bush
1921; Sir Malcolm Arnold; Ruth Gipps; Robert Simpson
1922: Iain Hamilton; John Veale
1923: Arthur Butterworth


Now, of these nine some are obvious romantics(eg Arnell) or in the mainstream of the British symphonic tradition, influenced by Vaughan Williams or Sibelius(eg Gardner, Bush, Arnold, Gipps, Veale, Butterworth). The three who stand out as more obviously modern are Simpson and Hamilton; but, again, Simpson is influenced by Beethoven, Bruckner and Nielsen).

Fricker and Hamilton are the two composers who push tonality, who were influenced by more of the contemporary European mainstream(Bartok, Stravinsky etc) and both have disappeared without trace from our record labels and our concert halls.

I am by no means an advocate for "modernist music" ;D I love the music of the British traditionalists.......but the absolute and total neglect of Fricker and Hamilton (not to mention my "heroes" of the earlier generation: Arnold Cooke, William Wordsworth and Daniel Jones) is a scandal >:(


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cilgwyn on January 04, 2013, 12:39:40 am
Scandalous certainly describes the neglect of Daniel Jones,here in his native Wales,by the so called BBC National Orchestra of Wales! >:(
Anyway,I've been over this before here & elsewhere,haven't I! ;D :(

The Rabaud Symphony sounds interesting. I do wish Timpani would consider the Tournemire symphonies! Oh,well.... ::) :(


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 04, 2013, 01:43:48 am
The Rabaud Symphony sounds interesting. I do wish Timpani would consider the Tournemire symphonies! Oh,well.... ::) :(
Please do investigate the Rabaud, cilgwyn. If you like big late-romantic symphonies, you couldn't go wrong with it! I also wish Timpani would record the Tournemire symphonies-the Marco Polo recordings don't serve these wonderful works nearly well enough :(


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cilgwyn on January 04, 2013, 01:25:07 pm
It sounds right up my street,as they say! It's on my 'list' now! Ropartz is another one. As to Tournemire,maybe I should start a thread? Can't understand the neglect! I only wish I owned a cd label,although it would probably be Daniel Jones symphonies first! ;D

NB: Have Chandos abandoned their forum? Anyone else noticed this?!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 08, 2013, 01:58:18 am
Agreed, Toby! Orthel's powerful music certainly merits more attention than it has been getting. Fortunately, between the Etcetera disc and the downloads available here, we have access to all of Orthel's six symphonies and some other works of his :)

On the same subject but less somber H.Andriessen's Third IMHO a wonderful work.
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61CxWht8eGL._SL500_AA280_.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 08, 2013, 02:19:08 am
Indeed, Toby! As has been mentioned elsewhere, CPO is embarking on a Andriessen symphonic cycle (with other orchestral works thrown in). Although the Etcetera performances are fine, I have no doubt Cpo will be able to improve upon them. BTW did anyone here purchase the first volume in the CPO series (containing Symphony no. 1, Ballet Suite, Symphonic Etudes and Kuhnau Variations), and if so, how did it compare to the performances on Etcetera?

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w220/front/0/0761203772124.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on January 08, 2013, 03:11:11 am
With so many cds to buy I really cannot afford duplications........BUT I might be tempted by the cpo disc for the simple and single reason that the performance of the Andriessen Symphony No.1 on the Etcetera disc is a rather ancient recording from 1947.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on January 08, 2013, 07:05:13 pm
Indeed, Toby! As has been mentioned elsewhere, CPO is embarking on a Andriessen symphonic cycle (with other orchestral works thrown in). Although the Etcetera performances are fine, I have no doubt Cpo will be able to improve upon them. BTW did anyone here purchase the first volume in the CPO series (containing Symphony no. 1, Ballet Suite, Symphonic Etudes and Kuhnau Variations), and if so, how did it compare to the performances on Etcetera?

(http://www.jpc.de/image/w220/front/0/0761203772124.jpg)

Not yet, but hope to find the funds for it in a few weeks time. I am planning to buy it for the same reason Colin (Dundonnell) mentins: the historical 1947 performance of the First Symphony - from 1930, an early work - on Etcetera leaves much to be desired. Another good reason might be the Ballet Suite ('Ballet-suite') for orchestra from his vintage years (1947). I don't think I ever heard the piece before.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 08, 2013, 08:04:38 pm
Please report back if you do purchase the CD :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 08, 2013, 11:38:38 pm
Indeed, Toby! As has been mentioned elsewhere, CPO is embarking on a Andriessen symphonic cycle (with other orchestral works thrown in). Although the Etcetera performances are fine, I have no doubt Cpo will be able to improve upon them. BTW did anyone here purchase the first volume in the CPO series (containing Symphony no. 1, Ballet Suite, Symphonic Etudes and Kuhnau Variations), and if so, how did it compare to the performances on Etcetera?


I have to add also this:
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/MuzeAudioArt/Large/21/1112621.jpg)
Maybe a correct statement regarding netherlands music say that Holland had for any time
a more conservative language than Belgium?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 09, 2013, 12:48:46 am
Hmmm...the negative reviews on Amazon deterred me from buying this CD :-\

Toby-you seem to have a positive opinion of it...what do other members think?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Caostotale on January 09, 2013, 05:58:42 am
I have been busy digging through lots of Soviet-era scores this past year, so great discoveries are coming at me quite often. If forced to point out my most significant 'discovery of the year', I would have to single out Georgian composer Sulkhan Tsintsadze and point out the following amazing website, which has all of his string quartets available for streaming:

http://www.georgian-music.com/free_music/tsintsadze.php

In addition to that, it was excellent to hear both his 24 preludes for piano and his 24 preludes for cello/piano on Youtube thanks to some generous individuals on there.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on January 09, 2013, 07:35:27 am
Maybe a correct statement regarding netherlands music say that Holland had for any time
a more conservative language than Belgium?

A perhaps more correct observation would be, that Chandos opted for the more conservative names - mostly long neglected, as e.g. Dopper, Voormolen, even Hol, the peculiar choices Chandos made met with general disapproval and even embarrassment, in Dutch musical circles - just because of the long dominance of Modernism. The same applies to CPO, with their choice for e.g. Van Gilse, Röntgen, Badings and Andriessen, all long neglected for similar reasons. Overall, one cannot say that Modernism came later in the Netherlands than in Belgium; in e.g. painting and music it might even be the other way around.

(I'm not claming that Modernism is something 'better' or of higher interest; my own interest lies more with Neoclassicism in the broader sense and I personally prefer Andriessen and Badings over their more 'modern' contemporaries. Just trying to make a historical observation).  ;)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 09, 2013, 11:34:33 pm
Maybe a correct statement regarding netherlands music say that Holland had for any time
a more conservative language than Belgium?

A perhaps more correct observation would be, that Chandos opted for the more conservative names - mostly long neglected, as e.g. Dopper, Voormolen, even Hol, the peculiar choices Chandos made met with general disapproval and even embarrassment, in Dutch musical circles - just because of the long dominance of Modernism. The same applies to CPO, with their choice for e.g. Van Gilse, Röntgen, Badings and Andriessen, all long neglected for similar reasons. Overall, one cannot say that Modernism came later in the Netherlands than in Belgium; in e.g. painting and music it might even be the other way around.

(I'm not claming that Modernism is something 'better' or of higher interest; my own interest lies more with Neoclassicism in the broader sense and I personally prefer Andriessen and Badings over their more 'modern' contemporaries. Just trying to make a historical observation).  ;)

Thanks for your observation.
May you suggest conservative post 1930 belgian composers (beyond Maes)?
However i saw a hint of RVW style both in Orthel than in Andriessen but perhaps are ravelian echoes.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 10, 2013, 12:43:27 am
First of all, I am not sure exactly what you mean by "post-1930". Do you mean born after 1930 or composed music after 1930? I am assuming you mean the latter, since you mention Jef Maes, who was born in 1905. If you do mean the latter, then there are many conservative Belgian composers who composed music after 1930. Allow me to list a few:

Jean Absil, Daniel Sternefeld, Arthur Meulemans, Jef van Hoof, Joseph Jongen, Flor Alpaerts, Joseph Ryelandt, Jean Rogister, Armand Marsick, Marcel Poot, Peter Cabus, Godfried and Frederic Devreese, Willem Kersters, Vic Legley, Frederik van Rossum, Peter Welffens, David van de Woestijne, Richard de Guide, Ludewijk de Vocht, Marinus de Jong, Frits Celis, Robert Herberigs, Prosper van Eechaute, Ernest van der Eyken etc.

I'm sure there are many more! All of the above composers are well worth exploring. I'm not sure I agree with your statement that Dutch music, in general, is more conservative than Belgian music. Truth be told, neither country could be counted among the more musically "advanced" countries. But I don't can't think of any Belgian composers who were as innovative and original as Pijper and Badings that lived in the same approximate time period of those two composers. Many of the Belgian composers were strongly influenced by French music and wrote music in the late-romantic, impressionistic and neo-classical styles, rather than the bold, harder-edged, more modern style Pijper and Badings developed. In other words, Dutch music has a stronger identity than Belgian music; not as strong as, say Nordic or Russian music, but stronger than Belgian music, which could easily be mistaken for French music in many cases. Just my two cents worth.

 :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 10, 2013, 01:08:10 am
First of all, I am not sure exactly what you mean by "post-1930". Do you mean born after 1930 or composed music after 1930? I am assuming you mean the latter, since you mention Jef Maes, who was born in 1905. If you do mean the latter, then there are many conservative Belgian composers who composed music after 1930. Allow me to list a few:

Jean Absil, Daniel Sternefeld, Arthur Meulemans, Jef van Hoof, Joseph Jongen, Flor Alpaerts, Joseph Ryelandt, Jean Rogister, Armand Marsick, Marcel Poot, Peter Cabus, Godfried and Frederic Devreese, Willem Kersters, Vic Legley, Frederik van Rossum, Peter Welffens, David van de Woestijne, Richard de Guide, Ludewijk de Vocht, Marinus de Jong, Frits Celis, Robert Herberigs, Prosper van Eechaute, Ernest van der Eyken etc.

I'm sure there are many more! All of the above composers are well worth exploring. I'm not sure I agree with your statement that Dutch music, in general, is more conservative than Belgian music. Truth be told, neither country could be counted among the more musically "advanced" countries. But I don't can't think of any Belgian composers who were as innovative and original as Pijper and Badings that lived in the same approximate time period of those two composers. Many of the Belgian composers were strongly influenced by French music and wrote music in the late-romantic, impressionistic and neo-classical styles, rather than the bold, harder-edged, more modern style Pijper and Badings developed. In other words, Dutch music has a stronger identity than Belgian music; not as strong as, say Nordic or Russian music, but stronger than Belgian music, which could easily be mistaken for French music in many cases. Just my two cents worth.

 :)

Many TNX for your exhaustive answer IMHO would be concerning also explore relationship
between these composers and folklore heritage in both countries.
 :)
Going to Switzerland i was delighted by this:
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_250/MI0001/034/MI0001034316.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) hope that now works.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 10, 2013, 01:39:55 am
You're welcome :) Inspired by this interesting discussion, I've just posted a catalogue of the operatic and orchestral works of the very fine Belgian composer Robert Herberigs (chamber and piano works to come next). Um, it looks like you forgot to post a picture or something as there is a very large amount of space underneath your post ;)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 10, 2013, 01:55:54 am
I have been busy digging through lots of Soviet-era scores this past year, so great discoveries are coming at me quite often. If forced to point out my most significant 'discovery of the year', I would have to single out Georgian composer Sulkhan Tsintsadze and point out the following amazing website, which has all of his string quartets available for streaming:

http://www.georgian-music.com/free_music/tsintsadze.php

In addition to that, it was excellent to hear both his 24 preludes for piano and his 24 preludes for cello/piano on Youtube thanks to some generous individuals on there.

Thanks for the link, Caos! Tsintsadze is a composer I have long been interested in. His Fantasy for piano and orchestra, which is a delightful and wholly accessible mixture of Rachmaninov and Khachaturian, is a favorite of mine. His later works are a bit less conservative in general, but still quite accessible to my ears. There's this disc with the Fantasy and some other orchestral works of his and of his countryman Alexei Machavariani:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/612UEmxa65L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

and his Violin Concerto no. 2 and Fantasy for piano and orchestra on YouTube:
VC (1/2): http://youtu.be/WwtWrUUerJg
VC (2/2): http://youtu.be/8NopW0ODGjA
Fantasy: http://youtu.be/N9UDEp9AS1o

I'd really like to hear at least one of his five symphonies, which do not appear to be available anywhere.

 :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 10, 2013, 01:59:50 am
Going to Switzerland i was delighted by this:
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_250/MI0001/034/MI0001034316.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) hope that now works.

Thanks for fixing this! Quite a bit of Gerber's music has been recorded by Gallo: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dpopular&field-keywords=rene+gerber#/ref=sr_pg_1?rh=n%3A5174%2Ck%3Arene+gerber&keywords=rene+gerber&ie=UTF8&qid=1357783107

Quite delightful music, indeed! Not a major composer but one who is definitely deserving of people's attention.

 :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Caostotale on January 10, 2013, 04:43:09 am

and his Violin Concerto no. 2 and Fantasy for piano and orchestra on YouTube:
VC (1/2): http://youtu.be/WwtWrUUerJg
VC (2/2): http://youtu.be/8NopW0ODGjA
Fantasy: http://youtu.be/N9UDEp9AS1o

I'd really like to hear at least one of his five symphonies, which do not appear to be available anywhere.

 :)

The bottom of that Georgian page has five concertos and an opera. The third symphony is recorded on a 1971 Melodiya LP. That one doesn't appear to be on eBay right now but I was surprised to see the following LP...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Tsintsadze-Gabunia-Azarashvili-Sanadze-Georgian-LP-/271123240391?pt=UK_Records&hash=item3f203455c7

...which contains the Fantasia for string quartet and orchestra from 1977.

He's really an excellent composer. Perhaps the best recording I've heard of his work is a Georgian State String Quartet disc containing his sixth quartet and a set of miniatures (along with Sulkhan Nasidze's beautiful fifth quartet):

http://www.amazon.com/Nasidze-Tsintsadze-String-Quartet-No/dp/B0058XB0TE

It's a bummer that the rest of his quartets aren't yet on record, but I suppose that's why I'm so thankful for those streaming recordings.

The appearance of some Azerbaijani works on the Naxos label in recent years gave me some hope that labels like that might dig deeper into the rich musical cultures of the Caucasus, Ukraine, and Central Asian countries.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on January 10, 2013, 01:20:34 pm
However i saw a hint of RVW style both in Orthel than in Andriessen but perhaps are ravelian echoes.

Yes, I think they are. British music never played a role in the Netherlands and both Orthel and Andriessen had a preference for French music. Andriessen wrote extensively on music, he's a fine writer too, but I doubt if I ever read the name 'RVW' in it. Vaughan Williams was hardly, if ever, performed in this country and is still largely absent.

Generally speaking, the Dutch musical world functioned as a backyard to the German musical world in the 19th Century and came only to stand on its own feet around 1900, when French influences and a general cultural renewal (sometimes considered a 'Second Golden Age') prevailed. Especially Andriessen was more influenced by French than by German culture, though he was a men of wide cultural interest and also looked back to Old Music and followed everything contemporary of his liking. But I doubt if he ever heard anything by RVW, notwithstanding some similarities in style (I myself love both composers).

Orthel was almost completely neglected and rarely performed, apart from the termporal success of his Piccola Sinfonia (No. 2, 1940). For me, the twofer with his Third and Fourth symphonies came as a big surprise, three years ago, and made me 'discover' him anew (I had known the Evocazione before, heard on the radio around 1979, but that was his only piece I knew for decades). BTW: his Fifth and Sixthe symphonies can be found among the downloads on this site.

Andriessen too suffered neglect; especially from the 1960s on he, and a complete generation of 'conservative' composers, were almost completely done away with, especially under the influence of the revolutionary 1968 generation - among whom his youngest son, Louis Andriessen, used to be quite influential). I was happy to see Louis in a concert, more or less a second premiere, of Hendrik Andriessen's Veertien Stonden [Fourteen Canonical Hours] for choir and strings, three years ago in Utrecht (and own a cd of that performance). He nowadays more or less 'honours' his father's legacy again, but it has been a long time.

It isn't accidental that we can only now - especially since the release by Etcetera of the twofer with them - hear his four symphonies, the more so now CPO started a cycle that will probably inclue the other orchestral music as well.  :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on January 10, 2013, 03:11:36 pm
I have no issue with the rediscovery and promotion of the generation of Dutch composers which includes Bernhard Zweers(b. 1854), Julius Rontgen(b. 1855), Johan Wagenaar(b.1862), Alphons Diepenbrock(b.1862), Cornelis Dopper(b.1870) and Jan van Gilse(b. 1881).

Some of these composers-Rontgen is the obvious example-were clearly heavily influenced by composers like Brahms and (in Rontgen's case). In others, the beginnings of the influence of French music can begin to be heard.

Hendrik Andriessen belongs-it seems to me-to belong to the next generation. He was born in 1892. In between, of course, is the eccentric "on-off" figure of Matthjis Vermeulen(b. 1888).

But it is the next generation of Dutch composers, who are more clearly of the 20th century and are more obviously inflenced by the European mainstream(from Mahler onwards) who deserve equal and urgent attention.

CPO have made a start with Henk Badings(b. 1907) but it is a slow start and-given Badings' prodigious output and the developmental nature of his music-needs to be speeded up. Orthel, a contemprary of Badings (he was born two years earlier in 1905)  has, quite correctly, been mentioned.

But the other astonishing omission is Willem Pijper(born two years after Andriessen in 1894). Pijper was a hugely influential and important figure in Dutch music in the 1920s and 1930s. True, he did not always exercise his influence 'kindly'. His strong disagreements with other Dutch composers and the way in which he used his power to undermine their positions was, to say the least, unfortunate ::)  But his music deserves far more attention than it has received in recent times.

One could certainly argue that in the 1930s (before the German invasion in 1940) the two most significant Dutch composers were Pijper and Badings. There are historical reasons for understanding the previous neglect of the latter, given the question marks around his conduct during the German Occupation of the Netherlands.....but it is time extra-musical considerations were put aside and the music given its proper place.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: shamus on January 10, 2013, 04:39:11 pm
Some Dutch Jewish composers have always been my favorites. Leo Smit, to me was an amazing composer, who was murdered by the Nazis age 43, and Rosy Wertheim (1888-1949) wrote some lovely songs and chamber works, as well as a piano concerto. She was able to remain in Holland in hiding with the help of friends and continued composing and teaching. The first movement of her piano concerto was prepared for a concert several years ago, I can't remember the name of the man who did it, but it was played by Jonahan Gilad, and made me want to hear the whole thing. Many of Smits works have thankfully been recorded by the Dutch government. Another composer whose music I have enjoyed when I could find it was Sem Dresden (1881-1957). Dick Kattenburg (1919-1944) was also murdered by the Nazis and his songs I have heard were magical. By the way, I hate Nazis.

http://www.leosmit.org/ (http://www.leosmit.org/)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosy_Wertheim (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosy_Wertheim)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 10, 2013, 07:58:18 pm
Sem Dresden (1881-1957)

He has intrigued me as well. Not much of his has been recorded, but his two cello sonatas can be found on the recently-released Dutch Cello Sonatas Vol. 5:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61oh0ru5ssL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

and his Suite Dansflitsen (Dance Flashes) for orchestra can be found on this now-OOP disc (which contains Orthel's inaptly named Sinfonia Piccola):

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/21TDQJ7NPHL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

There are two different versions of Dansflitsen on YouTube:

(cond. by Willem van Otterloo): http://youtu.be/m237VYbx3yw
(cond. by Rafael Kubelik): http://youtu.be/w4DLzc5ZBaA

Here's his Wikipedia article, which contains a worklist: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sem_dresden

 :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 10, 2013, 07:59:42 pm
By the way, I hate Nazis.

You're not alone, Jim ;D ;D


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Caostotale on January 10, 2013, 09:21:30 pm
I don't like Nazis either, but I like Badings' music and think his work deserves wider recognition. I similarly loathe pedophiles, but am not about to start second-guessing Szymanowski's great work as a composer. I'm also curious about the work of Lev Knipper, despite the idea that he may have murdered or tortured people during his time working as a Soviet secret police officer. The way I see it, people can quite often be total shit, but their musics are not inextricably married to the rest of their beings.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on January 10, 2013, 10:56:17 pm
It is perfectly true that Badings took over as Director of the Conservatory in the Hague when Dresden was dismissed and that he was accused of collaboration with the German authorities during the War. Whether this is a significantly different "crime" than many Russian composers can be accused of during the Soviet era I would not wish to argue.

The fact is that many listeners can dissociate these Russian composers from the works written extolling Stalin's rule. It would appear that Badings has effectively been 'rehabilitated' within the Netherlands and I would have thought, therefore, we can concentrate on his music.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 11, 2013, 08:02:54 pm
I remember having a flick through 'Mein Kampf',years ago........out of mere curiosity,I should point out!!! My goodness it was boring!!

I commend you for putting yourself through such torture, cilgwyn ;D

I think we'd best be getting back on topic.....maybe we should carry on this conversation by starting a thread on politics and music-a subject I don't like very much but is interesting to hear people's views on. I know I'm not the moderator, but...

Did I mention that I hate Nazis? ;D


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cilgwyn on January 11, 2013, 08:44:01 pm
Agreed! I notice that while this thread is entitled 'Your Discovery of the Year' most of the discoveries appear to be of Dutch composers? Nothing wrong with that,of course!! Personally,my own 'discoveries' have been less adventurous in some ways. Revisiting aknowledged masterpieces (after years of Daniel Jones,Havergal Brian,etc!)  that I haven't listened to for a while....tut! tut! For example,the Zinman Beethoven cycle on the Arte Nova label. My parents (& grandparents) always seemed to stock those old Decca Ace of Clubs recordings & Karajan cycles! These were a bit of a revelation & nice and cheap too! Also,the Schumann symphonies,which I never seemed to have bothered with too much,for some reason,Szell conducting Brahms symphonies & Leppard's Brandenburg Concerto's seem like a discovery,albeit re-discovery,after some of the more recent recordings I have heard. Of course,they are outmoded these days,but this is the kind of Bach I was brought up on! Stately,serene,majestic,grand!
So maybe I'll pick the Zinman Beethoven cycle,minus the ninth. Whatever anyone may say about Karajan the soloists on the old 60s recording are superb & I need first class singing on a work like that. I notice the new Glossa cycle is praised up to the hilt in the new IRR Magazine,but it's only available as a box set & I'm not terribly keen,generally speaking,on live recordings!

So there you are. My unadventurous (re!)'discovery' of the year! The aknowledged masters!

NB: Tend to agree with you about my last post kyjo so I've removed it! Self moderation? Why not!! ;D


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Malito on January 13, 2013, 11:26:34 pm
The opera from 1910 by Mexican composer Julian Carrillo entitled "Matilde: Mexico 1810" which I found in Mexico City in December.  Knowing of his later music and his microtonal works I was reluctant but figured if it was written in 1910 it would be a safe choice and I was right.  It is excellent.  Malito


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 14, 2013, 02:27:24 am
Interesting! Carrillo has this fine website (in Spanish) dedicated to him, which includes some sound samples (click on "Obras Musicales" to find the sound samples): http://www.sonido13.com/index.html



Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 14, 2013, 02:38:12 am
So maybe I'll pick the Zinman Beethoven cycle,minus the ninth.

Yes, Zinman's fresh, energetic approach (which he achieves without using period instruments, thankfully ;D) works well in all of the symphonies but the ninth (perhaps besides the Scherzo). In this work, one often wishes for a more grandiose interpretation, such as Furtwangler's 1951 recording with the Bayreuth Festival Orchestra (one of my favorites).

On the topic of Beethoven symphonies, I heard the finale of Beethoven 1 on the radio played by the Bremen German Chamber Philharmonic under Paavo Jarvi. I was stunned! The playing was so very zesty, crisp and invigorating-I especially loved the tight timpani sound! Like Zinman, Jarvi achieves this effect without the use of period instruments. It was like hearing the piece anew! It's available on this RCA CD, coupled with Symphony no. 5:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41cUpCBpofL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Back to discoveries of the year!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: guest54 on January 14, 2013, 04:14:47 am
My discovery of last year was a video of Enescu's Oedipus on You-Tube - something I have been seeking for many years. Both the video and the sound are of very poor quality, having been recorded by some one in the - presumably Roumanian - audience. Nevertheless even that is far better than nothing. I already have a CD of the work - sound only, which comes with an English translation of the complete libretto, so - when the index of composers is finished - I am going to attempt to combine the poor video with the good sound from the CD, and attach some English sub-titles. The whole process will provide a welcome opportunity to become quite familiar with the whole work. I don't know why it is so seldom mounted.



Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 14, 2013, 11:05:13 pm
First of all, I am not sure exactly what you mean by "post-1930". Do you mean born after 1930 or composed music after 1930? I am assuming you mean the latter, since you mention Jef Maes, who was born in 1905. If you do mean the latter, then there are many conservative Belgian composers who composed music after 1930. Allow me to list a few:

Jean Absil, Daniel Sternefeld, Arthur Meulemans, Jef van Hoof, Joseph Jongen, Flor Alpaerts, Joseph Ryelandt, Jean Rogister, Armand Marsick, Marcel Poot, Peter Cabus, Godfried and Frederic Devreese, Willem Kersters, Vic Legley, Frederik van Rossum, Peter Welffens, David van de Woestijne, Richard de Guide, Ludewijk de Vocht, Marinus de Jong, Frits Celis, Robert Herberigs, Prosper van Eechaute, Ernest van der Eyken etc.

I'm sure there are many more! All of the above composers are well worth exploring. I'm not sure I agree with your statement that Dutch music, in general, is more conservative than Belgian music. Truth be told, neither country could be counted among the more musically "advanced" countries. But I don't can't think of any Belgian composers who were as innovative and original as Pijper and Badings that lived in the same approximate time period of those two composers. Many of the Belgian composers were strongly influenced by French music and wrote music in the late-romantic, impressionistic and neo-classical styles, rather than the bold, harder-edged, more modern style Pijper and Badings developed. In other words, Dutch music has a stronger identity than Belgian music; not as strong as, say Nordic or Russian music, but stronger than Belgian music, which could easily be mistaken for French music in many cases. Just my two cents worth.

 :)

Could i add them Jacques Leduc?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 15, 2013, 12:29:23 am
Thanks for reminding me about Leduc, Toby. He is a composer I have not yet investigated. There is this Cyprčs disc of his orchestral works:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51gN7xD8iuL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

includes Ouverture d'été, Symphony, Esquisse Symphonique Le Printemps

and a 2-CD set (also Cyprčs) of his works for solo piano, two pianos, and harp:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41qM5-bT1xL._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

Here's an article on him from the Cyprčs website: http://www.cypres-records.com/index.php?lang=en&option=com_phpshop&page=shop.artists_details&artist_id=31&Itemid=26

 :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: nigelkeay on January 22, 2013, 10:03:04 pm
Jean Absil
Just thought I'd mention that I heard "Echecs, suite for piano op.96 (1957) in a concert on Saturday. Performed by Quentin Meurisse this was the French premiere and was in a Cantus Formus concert organized by Nicolas Bacri. It was an interesting concert, a diverse range of works for piano including; Trois Allégories by Chrystel Marchand, and Patrice Sciortino's "Catatoc".


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Caostotale on January 24, 2013, 04:22:22 am
Jean Absil
Just thought I'd mention that I heard "Echecs, suite for piano op.96 (1957) in a concert on Saturday. Performed by Quentin Meurisse this was the French premiere and was in a Cantus Formus concert organized by Nicolas Bacri. It was an interesting concert, a diverse range of works for piano including; Trois Allégories by Chrystel Marchand, and Patrice Sciortino's "Catatoc".

I discovered Absil a few years back and was delighted when Daniel Blumenthal released his two-disc set of piano works (which includes the 'Echecs' suite). Some group needs to record his four string quartets now.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Latvian on January 24, 2013, 01:26:12 pm
Quote
Quote from: nigelkeay on January 22, 2013, 10:03:04 pm
Quote from: kyjo on January 10, 2013, 12:43:27 am
Jean Absil
Just thought I'd mention that I heard "Echecs, suite for piano op.96 (1957) in a concert on Saturday. Performed by Quentin Meurisse this was the French premiere and was in a Cantus Formus concert organized by Nicolas Bacri. It was an interesting concert, a diverse range of works for piano including; Trois Allégories by Chrystel Marchand, and Patrice Sciortino's "Catatoc".

I discovered Absil a few years back and was delighted when Daniel Blumenthal released his two-disc set of piano works (which includes the 'Echecs' suite). Some group needs to record his four string quartets now.

I'll put in a strong recommendation for Absil as well. His "Les chants du mort" came to my attention a long time ago on a Romanian Electrocord LP. The work is scored for three solo voices and orchestra and the texts are taken from Romanian folk poetry, sung in French. Absil spent time in Romania doing ethnomusicological research, hence the connection. Anyway, the music is glorious -- very lyrical, mildly exotic, vividly expressive.

A number of works are available on YT -- do investigate!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: rbert12 on January 24, 2013, 07:47:47 pm
My discovery for 2012?. Too many to count, thanks mostly to AMF and before that, to UC.
For 2013: Nicolas Astrinidis (1921-2010), for those who like symphonico-choral works and don't know him, please hurry to YT there are several hours of music, mostly oratorios. Great music!.
Also Florentin Giménez (1925), composer from Paraguay, you can listen to two of his symphonies at Radio Mec website, at Conciertos das Américas http://radiomec.com.br/concertodasamericas/destaques/.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 24, 2013, 08:03:29 pm
Thanks for the tips, Roberto! I must admit that I had previously never heard of any Paraguayan composers (let alone heard their music) ::)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 24, 2013, 11:21:44 pm
Thanks for the tips, Roberto! I must admit that I had previously never heard of any Paraguayan composers (let alone heard their music) ::)

Here more about him:
http://florentingimenez.guairaproducciones.com.py/discos/disco_04.htm


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on January 24, 2013, 11:25:36 pm
Thanks, Toby :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on February 05, 2013, 11:04:34 pm
I have been busy digging through lots of Soviet-era scores this past year, so great discoveries are coming at me quite often. If forced to point out my most significant 'discovery of the year', I would have to single out Georgian composer Sulkhan Tsintsadze and point out the following amazing website, which has all of his string quartets available for streaming:

http://www.georgian-music.com/free_music/tsintsadze.php

In addition to that, it was excellent to hear both his 24 preludes for piano and his 24 preludes for cello/piano on Youtube thanks to some generous individuals on there.

Thanks for the link, Caos! Tsintsadze is a composer I have long been interested in. His Fantasy for piano and orchestra, which is a delightful and wholly accessible mixture of Rachmaninov and Khachaturian, is a favorite of mine. His later works are a bit less conservative in general, but still quite accessible to my ears. There's this disc with the Fantasy and some other orchestral works of his and of his countryman Alexei Machavariani:

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/612UEmxa65L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)

and his Violin Concerto no. 2 and Fantasy for piano and orchestra on YouTube:
VC (1/2): http://youtu.be/WwtWrUUerJg
VC (2/2): http://youtu.be/8NopW0ODGjA
Fantasy: http://youtu.be/N9UDEp9AS1o

I'd really like to hear at least one of his five symphonies, which do not appear to be available anywhere.

 :)

Dear Kyjo
Sadly it's only a reissue of this disc in CD-R.
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51vd6hAQ%2B3L._SL500_AA300_.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on February 05, 2013, 11:36:45 pm
Yamada - Nagauta Symphony, 'Tsurukame', 1934 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/17337
Gholmieh - Symphony No. 3 in G Major, 'Yarmuk', (Symphony Of Freedom).mp3 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/27171
Nosyrev - Symphony No. 3, 1978 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/35018
Pipkov - Symphony No. 1,  Op. 22, 1937-40 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/22657
Rautio - Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, 1971 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/7479
Mirzoyan - Symphony for string orchestra and kettle-drums, 1962 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/19853
Bezborodko - Concerto Grosso ma non Molto, for Violin, Bassoon, & Strings = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/26361
Dalbavie - Trio No. 1, for Violin, Cello, & Piano, 2008 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/20795


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on February 06, 2013, 01:17:43 am
Thanks for the info about the Gauk CD-I have no problem with it being taken from that set as I would not want the extra "baggage" (i.e. "sung" works) that comes along with it in the box set!

Oh, and thanks for the list! I only know the Yamada, Nosyrev and Mirzoyan symphonies. The last two are quite powerful works, very well worth investigating :) Which isn't to say, of course, that the Yamada isn't! At least it's more Japanese-sounding than his Triumph and Peace Symphony, which could've been written by a mid to late 19th-century German composer!




Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on February 08, 2013, 09:56:13 am
Agreed, Toby! Orthel's powerful music certainly merits more attention than it has been getting. Fortunately, between the Etcetera disc and the downloads available here, we have access to all of Orthel's six symphonies and some other works of his :)

Orthels music is great..If it were not for abysmally poor audio for most of his symphonies, he would be a favorite of many more.
The cycle is screaming to be redone...


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on February 08, 2013, 03:01:37 pm
Yamada - Nagauta Symphony, 'Tsurukame', 1934 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/17337
Gholmieh - Symphony No. 3 in G Major, 'Yarmuk', (Symphony Of Freedom).mp3 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/27171
Nosyrev - Symphony No. 3, 1978 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/35018
Pipkov - Symphony No. 1,  Op. 22, 1937-40 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/22657
Rautio - Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, 1971 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/7479
Mirzoyan - Symphony for string orchestra and kettle-drums, 1962 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/19853
Bezborodko - Concerto Grosso ma non Molto, for Violin, Bassoon, & Strings = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/26361
Dalbavie - Trio No. 1, for Violin, Cello, & Piano, 2008 = http://classical-music-online.net/en/production/20795

Will much enjoy trying most, if not all of these, thank you !


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: BrianA on February 08, 2013, 03:29:55 pm
So, returning to the original premise of this discussion.... ;D

Like, I'm sure, many of you, I owe much to the generous contributors to this forum, as well as UC and the Soviet composers forum, and I could easily answer this question differently on different days, bur putting it all into the basket and coming up with just one name, I don't think there's any music I've discovered over the past year or so that I've enjoyed more than the symphonies of Mikhail Nosyrev, especially the first.

Please note that I do not consider myself to be a musician, and my responses to the music I love are not necessarily musically well informed, but notwithstanding Nosyrev's rather tragic personal history, I find that there's odten a cartoonish, looney tunes kind of character to some of this music.  There are passages in which I sometimes have visions of Elmer Fudd or Bugs Bunny popping out from behind a bush.  Please note that, bizarre as it may sound, I mean this in a totally positive way.  Nuttiness in music, it seems, is something I appreciate more and more the older I get.   ;)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on February 10, 2013, 12:19:50 am
Orthels music is great..If it were not for abysmally poor audio for most of his symphonies, he would be a favorite of many more.
The cycle is screaming to be redone...

I agree heartily with you :) With CPO doing series of the symphonic outputs of Rontgen, van Gilse, Badings and now Andriessen, perhaps they should consider Orthel :) His music is of an undoubtedly high quality-dare I say even more so than Badings?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on February 28, 2013, 11:47:35 am
Further discoveries:
Surinach - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra, 1973
Butsko - Old Russian Painting, Symphonic Suite No. 1, 1970
Galynin - Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1, 1946
Rääts - Concerto for Five Op.120, 2002
Rääts - Symphony No. 2, Op. 8, 1958, (Rev. Op. 8. 1979)
Rääts - Symphony No. 8, 1987
Mácha - Simfonietta
Nova - Thirteen, 13x8@terror generating deity (the ultimate reality)
Pingoud - Extinguished Torches


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on February 28, 2013, 11:08:00 pm
Symphony Persepolis + other work
(http://www.rkac.com/people/images/Aminollah-Hossein.jpg)
He was born in Samarkand and in its colorful music we can recognize influx op russian and persian folklore


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 06, 2013, 01:37:34 pm
Luiz De Cabos..


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Malito on March 10, 2013, 03:45:35 am
So many interesting titles here...mouth-watering (ear-watering?) to say the lest.  Are any of the works available for upload on this site? Malito


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on March 10, 2013, 04:37:08 am
Shan-de - Long March Symphony
Russo - Street Music, Op. 65
Zender - Schubert's Winterreise, A Composed Interpretation
Finnendahl - Forgery, String Quartet, 2002-3
Chicheev - Symphony No. 2 in C Minor
Comes - Choreographic Suite, 'Sarmis'
Cuclin - Symphony No. 9, in A minor, 1949
Draga - Symphony No. 1, 1963, rev. 1965
Nosyrev - Symphony No. 3, 1978
Pascanu - 'Poemul Carpatilor'


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on March 10, 2013, 05:15:46 am
I greatly appreciate you listing "discoveries" you've made, SBookman-it makes the job of choosing what to listen to (out of a overwhelming number of works available to us) a bit easier :) Please do continue to report any further discoveries you have made!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on March 10, 2013, 05:12:30 pm
I greatly appreciate you listing "discoveries" you've made, SBookman-it makes the job of choosing what to listen to (out of a overwhelming number number of works available to us) a bit easier :) Please do continue to report any further discoveries you have made!
Yes - seconded ! Whether they quite fit the topic, anything 'new' to have a glimpse of might just provide a discovery for us for 2013 !


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on March 10, 2013, 05:45:49 pm
Honegger - Concertino for Piano & Orchestra
Khairat O. - Arabs, History, & Civilization
Wei-jie - Images from Baima, 2007
Doubrava - Symphony No. 3, 'Tragická', 1958
Panufnik - Heroic Overture, 1952
Panufnik - Symphony No. 1, 'Sinfonia Rustica', 1948
Panufnik - Tragic Overture, 1955
Martinu - Toccata e Due Canzoni
Britten - String Quartet No. 2
Gorecki - Beatus Vir, Op. 38
Hillborg - Dreaming River, 1999


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Gauk on March 17, 2013, 10:42:39 pm
Symphony Persepolis + other work
He was born in Samarkand and in its colorful music we can recognize influx op russian and persian folklore

I have an LP of his 2nd and 3rd piano concertos. I played the 2nd to a friend of mine once, and he said "I'm familiar with ABCBA structure, and ABABA structure, and ABA structure, but this is the first time I've heard just A structure".


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on May 09, 2013, 12:26:01 pm
Kapr - Symphony No. 5, 'Olympic', 1959
Eckhardt-Gramatté - Piano Concerto No. 1, 1925-31
Finney - Symphony No. 1, 'Communique'
Hlavác - Elegikon
Hlavác - Symphonic Poem, 'Héró a Leandros'
Ustvolskaya - Octet, 1950
Martin - Danse De La Peur, (Dance Of Fear), for 2 Pianos & Small Orchestra, 1935
Foss - Capriccio for Cello & Piano, 1948
Foss - Symphony No. 2, 'Symphony of Chorales', 1956-8
Golijov - K'vakarat
Respighi - Belkis, Queen Of Sheba
Carmichael - Concierto Folklorico for Piano & String orchestra, 1965


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on May 09, 2013, 02:03:09 pm
IMHO Pejman is a true heir of Rimsky
(http://www.caltexrecords.com/3128-3109-thickbox/persian-music-ahmad-pejman-symphonic-sketches.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on May 13, 2013, 10:38:23 am
Aho - Rejoicing of the Deep Waters, Fantasy for Orchestra, 1995
Aho - Symphony No. 1, 1969 (particularly at 14:05)
Almashi - Chamber Symphony
Arapov - Symphony No. 7, 1991
Bezborodko - Fanfare & Fugue, for Brass Band
Blacher - Collage, 1968
Butsko - Symphony No. 3, 'Dithyramb'
Butsko - Symphony No. 4, 'Recitative Simphony'
Djabadary - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra, in A major, Op. 10, 1921
Galynin - Suite for Strings, 1949
Jenkins - 'Sarikiz', Concerto for Violin & Orchestra
Khanon - Middle Symphony, Op. 40, 1990


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: christopher on May 13, 2013, 04:31:34 pm
Symphony Persepolis + other work
He was born in Samarkand and in its colorful music we can recognize influx op russian and persian folklore

I have an LP of his 2nd and 3rd piano concertos. I played the 2nd to a friend of mine once, and he said "I'm familiar with ABCBA structure, and ABABA structure, and ABA structure, but this is the first time I've heard just A structure".

What are his dates and where is he from?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Gauk on May 13, 2013, 06:08:02 pm
Aminoullah Hussein (1905, Samarkand – 9 August 1983, Paris) was a celebrated Iranian composer of Neo-Romantic music.
His mother was a Persian woman from Samarkand (present-day Uzbekistan) and his father was a merchant, originally from Azerbaijan. Aminollah Hossein lived for a few years in Persia (Iran) before he left the country for his academic studies.

(From Last.FM, edited)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: chill319 on May 15, 2013, 05:01:35 am
I'll second SBookman's mention of Martinu's "Toccata e Due Canzoni," which I got to know in 2012.The toccata of this mid-1940s work is remarkably prescient of what Reich and other minimalists would be doing two decades later. The two canzonas are searching compositions, at once tough and tender. This is one of the most substantial and rewarding 20th-century piano concertos.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on May 15, 2013, 05:23:35 pm
Khanon - A Lonely Voice of Man
Kilar - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra, 1997 ?
Lukáš - Bagatelles for Symphony Orchestra, Op. 150, 1980
Mansell - Requiem For a Dream
Martin - Concerto for Piano & Small Orchestra, 1951
Rybnikov - Symphony No. 5, 'Resurrection of the Dead', 2005
Rääts - Concerto for Five Op.120, 2002
Sumera - Concerto for Cello and Orchestra
Sumera - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra
Sumera - Symphony No. 2, 1984
Sumera - Symphony No. 6, 2000
Surinach - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra, 1973


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: tapiola on May 15, 2013, 08:14:30 pm
I don't know where you guys find the time!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on May 16, 2013, 10:18:44 am
I don't know where you guys find the time!
Another one here.  8)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on May 16, 2013, 11:36:09 pm
Gentlemen,

Time is not found, like a sixpence, but, via priorities nicely selfishly hierarchized; time is created by simply capture by the determinant will. If one fails to undertake what is believed necessary, or important, then, clearly, and rightly, such is not necessary, not important.

Pärt - 'Wenn Bach Bienen Gezuchtet Hatte', for Piano, String Orchestra, & Wind Quintet
Taktakishvili - Piano Concerto No. 4, 1983
Tavener - Prayer of the Heart (Bjork)
Tavener - Theophany
Tavener - The Protecting Veil - for Cello & String Orchestra
Terteryan - Symphony No. 1, 1969
Ustvolskaya - Concerto for Piano, String Orch, & Timpani, 1946
Vasks - Musica Adventus, 1995-6
Vasks - Musica Dolorosa, for String Orchestra, 1984
Vasks - Piano Quartet, 2001
Zwilich - Symphony No. 1, 1983
Zwilich - Concerto Grosso, 1985


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on May 16, 2013, 11:49:17 pm
Salmenhaara - 'Suomi', (Finland)
Hlobil - Symphony No. 2, 'Victory Day', Op. 38, 1951
Hlobil - Symphony No. 4, Op. 58, 1959
Brusilovsky - Symphony No. 6, in G major, 'Kurmangazy', 1965
Andriessen - De Staat, 1976
Andriessen - Symphony for Open Strings
Butsko - Cantata No. 3, 'Wedding Songs', 1964
Erkin - Symphony No. 1, 1944-6
Inayat-Khan - 'Message Symphony'
Kabelác - Symphony No. 3, in F Major, for Organ, Brass, & Timpani, Op. 33, 1948-57
Kabelác - 'Mystery Of Time', Passacaglia for Large Orchestra, Op. 31, 1953-7
Kancheli - Symphony No. 5


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on May 17, 2013, 12:06:16 am
Kancheli - Symphony No. 7
Khanon - A Certain Concerto, for Piano & Orchestra, Op. 31, 1987
Krasavin - Novgorod Concerto, 2002
Markelov - Ringing, for Two Pianos
Ovchinnikov - Symphony No. 1, in E flat Minor
Rodrigo - Concerto-Serenade, for Harp and Orchestra, 1952
Shchedrin - Concerto for Orchestra No. 1, 'Naughty Limericks', 1963
Godár - Concerto Grosso, for Strings & Harpsichord
Galynin - Suite for Piano, 1945
Pulkkis - Concerto for piano and chamber orchestra, 'Tears of Ludovico', 1998
Inayat-Khan - 'Gandhi Symphony'
Jira - Symphony No. 7, 1985


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on June 07, 2013, 03:09:18 pm
IMHO We need a complete modern recording of Koetsier's symphonies.Second is superlative despite ancient 1948 performance
(http://www.cargo-records.de/cover/00052595.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on June 07, 2013, 04:43:08 pm
Kancheli - Symphony No. 7
Khanon - A Certain Concerto, for Piano & Orchestra, Op. 31, 1987
Krasavin - Novgorod Concerto, 2002
Markelov - Ringing, for Two Pianos
Ovchinnikov - Symphony No. 1, in E flat Minor
Rodrigo - Concerto-Serenade, for Harp and Orchestra, 1952
Shchedrin - Concerto for Orchestra No. 1, 'Naughty Limericks', 1963
Godár - Concerto Grosso, for Strings & Harpsichord
Galynin - Suite for Piano, 1945
Pulkkis - Concerto for piano and chamber orchestra, 'Tears of Ludovico', 1998
Inayat-Khan - 'Gandhi Symphony'
Jira - Symphony No. 7, 1985

Still enjoying scouring your suggestions for things I've never heard of - much appreciated, thanks !                   Clive.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on June 07, 2013, 05:45:43 pm
Bláha - Cyklorama
Bohnke - Concerto for Piano & Orchestre, 1925
Sumera - Piano Concerto, 1987, 1997
Mathias - Concerto for Harp & Orchestra, Op. 50
Maslanka - Symphony No. 4
Sibelius - Pohjola'a Daughter, Symphonic Fantasy
Salmenhaara - Symphony No. 4, 'Nel Mezzo del Cammin di Nostra Vita', 1972
Tanner - Boy With Goldfish
Tošic - 'Altus', for Orchestra
Tveitt - Sun God Symphony, 'Solgud'
Adams - Grand Pianola Music
Adams - Harmonielehre


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Gauk on June 07, 2013, 05:52:11 pm
It would be useful, though, to have more info than just a list of titles. Short descriptions? Links? There is a world of difference between Kancheli and John Adams, and not everyone who likes the one will like the other.

Otherwise one might just as well sample You Tube randomly.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on June 12, 2013, 11:57:40 pm
In the past, I had been enjoying various works by Julius Roentgen but his numbered symphonies really got my attention.
His 3rd sounds like Brahms on steroids or a Brahms 5th, his 8th paints a lonely dreamlike nordic world with a wordless chorus and his 13th
sounds remarkably forshawdows the high drama of Rangstrom. I am looking forward to hearing them all..


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on June 16, 2013, 11:16:10 pm
Kiyose Piano Concerto is a concerning piece
(http://cdbanq.net/img/shop11/FOCD-9533.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Bosque Bill on July 04, 2013, 09:21:56 pm
I'm not saying this just because it's the Fourth of July here in America, but my discovery involves the rollicking orchestral works of early American composer Anthony Philip Heinrich, which I've gotten to know entirely via online videos from performances supposedly earmarked for but never released on cpo, including "Woodland Spirits Chant" and "Manitou Mysteries." In a way, he's kind of like Ives in the sense nobody is quite like him, he puts off some folks, yet goes defiantly and merrily on his own way. One moment he seems to be conjuring up some scene from the rugged American wilderness, the next he's launched into his beloved "Yankee Doodle" or lapsed into some quickstep he wrote years earlier for another occasion. One moment he offers the grace of Schubert, the next he's like Berlioz but on steroids. But best of all, he's a lot of fun. Cpo really missed the boat on this one! I mean, anyone who can write a symphony about the now-extinct passenger pigeon ought to get more attention!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on July 04, 2013, 10:19:22 pm
Welcome to the forum! I agree that Heinrich is a fascinating figure-he was way ahead of his time for a composer whose dates were 1781-1861. There is certainly a similarity between his music and Berlioz's in its non-conformity and eccentricity. He composed no less than 14 symphonies, none of which follow tradition symphonic form and which often have fanciful titles (see a list of them here: http://www.musicweb-international.com/Ntl_discogs/American_Symphonies/american_symphonies1.htm). I never knew CPO had any interest in him-I'm not getting my hopes up for a release (knowing CPO's erratic release schedule), but I'll keep an eye out for any further developments. I see there are three of his orchestral pieces on YouTube (besides The Orinithological Combat of Kings, which is already available on a New World disc)-the two you mentioned in your post plus the Capriccio The war of the elements and the thundering of the Niagra. Such wordy titles remind one of the subtitles of Rued Langgaard's (a similarly eccentric composer) symphonies ;D


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Bosque Bill on July 05, 2013, 03:36:02 am
Many thanks for your kind words -- and, yes, the comparison with Rued Langgaard is dead-on. I absolutely cherish his hyper-romantic music but have never been able to link the bizarre titles of his compositions to what I'm actually hearing. Not that it really matters. And with two excellent cycles of Langgaard's symphonies in the last 15 years, there's always hope someone will at least record a disc of some of Heinrich's massive scores (besides the slim New World offering). Unfortunately, we Americans do a pretty sorry job of championing our own composers. Maybe Naxos or Dutton, with Keith Lockhart conducting for the latter. This stuff seems right up his alley, though Griffiths certainly seems to have an affinity and passion for Heinrich's works. And, for what it's worth, I look forward to expanding my horizons with this group!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on July 05, 2013, 04:42:36 am
I, too, love Langgaard's unrestrained and quirky hyper-romantisicsm and am eternally grateful for Dacapo for doing this musical "outsider" such great service :) I also couldn't agree with you more about the pitiful ignorance most American conductors show towards the musical heritage of their own country. Naxos' American Classics series was running strong for a while, but recently they seem to be recording more and more second-rate contemporary stuff (not all the contemporary music they have recorded is second-rate, though-Fuchs, Zwilich, Fetler and Samuel Jones are major exceptions). No longer are they turning out treasures like the disc of orchestral works by Henry Hadley, the Schuman, Harris and Diamond symphonies, the George Templeton Strong orchestral works, the Frederick Shepherd Converse symphonic poems and the Amy Beach Gaelic Symphony and Piano Concerto. Dutton (one of the most consistently excellent labels with regard to choices of repertoire, along with CPO) could certainly pick up where Naxos left off, as evidenced by their wonderful disc of more symphonic poems by Converse. Ah...this is turning into another one of my late-night rambles-better stop now! Anyways, I look forward to hearing more from you, Bill :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on July 05, 2013, 03:54:44 pm
IMHO We need a complete modern recording of Koetsier's symphonies.Second is superlative despite ancient 1948 performance
(http://www.cargo-records.de/cover/00052595.jpg)

Completely overlooked, great tip, manty thanks!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on July 10, 2013, 08:41:33 am
The 8 symphonies of the Croatian composer Stjepan Sulek were a great recent find for me.
I find his music fascinating, cleverly inventive and quite unique.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on July 10, 2013, 11:27:15 pm
The 8 symphonies of the Croatian composer Stjepan Sulek were a great recent find for me.
I find his music fascinating, cleverly inventive and quite unique.
I agree totally and hope for more cd releases i found particularly impressive 2 and 7
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/STJEPAN-SULEK-symphonies-3-8-concerts-1-2-4-CROATIAN-BRAND-NEW-DOUBLE-CD-/00/s/MTAwMFgxNDAw/$(KGrHqJ,!q4F!-hRHibwBQf!Rhs6h!~~60_58.JPG)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on July 11, 2013, 11:15:05 am
Terrific symphonies from Sulek - but can I mention his organ concerto too; just love to hear that in a concert hall !


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: relm1 on July 11, 2013, 04:38:39 pm
The 8 symphonies of the Croatian composer Stjepan Sulek were a great recent find for me.
I find his music fascinating, cleverly inventive and quite unique.
I agree totally and hope for more cd releases i found particularly impressive 2 and 7
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/STJEPAN-SULEK-symphonies-3-8-concerts-1-2-4-CROATIAN-BRAND-NEW-DOUBLE-CD-/00/s/MTAwMFgxNDAw/$(KGrHqJ,!q4F!-hRHibwBQf!Rhs6h!~~60_58.JPG)

I can't find any of his symphonies for purchase online especially the "impressive 2 and 7" if you can provide link?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on July 11, 2013, 05:18:12 pm
I do not know where to purchase the CD Toby mentioned (it is probably not available in the US, at least), but I do know that the complete cycle is available for download here and some can be found on YouTube.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on July 11, 2013, 11:12:18 pm
The 8 symphonies of the Croatian composer Stjepan Sulek were a great recent find for me.
I find his music fascinating, cleverly inventive and quite unique.
I agree totally and hope for more cd releases i found particularly impressive 2 and 7

I can't find any of his symphonies for purchase online especially the "impressive 2 and 7" if you can provide link?

This is ebay link for cds.I've downloaded 2-7 at UC but i hope for a modern cd recording.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/STJEPAN-SULEK-symphonies-3-8-concerts-1-2-4-CROATIAN-BRAND-NEW-DOUBLE-CD-/281124121275?pt=Music_CDs&hash=item41744daabb


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on July 12, 2013, 01:09:49 am
The 8 symphonies of the Croatian composer Stjepan Sulek were a great recent find for me.
I find his music fascinating, cleverly inventive and quite unique.
I agree totally and hope for more cd releases i found particularly impressive 2 and 7
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/STJEPAN-SULEK-symphonies-3-8-concerts-1-2-4-CROATIAN-BRAND-NEW-DOUBLE-CD-/00/s/MTAwMFgxNDAw/$(KGrHqJ,!q4F!-hRHibwBQf!Rhs6h!~~60_58.JPG)

I can't find any of his symphonies for purchase online especially the "impressive 2 and 7" if you can provide link?

1 and 2 Eroica)are here:
http://www.mediafire.com/?j8ub1u9r76b7b
6 and 7 here
http://www.mediafire.com/?fluz1skerbsqg53





They are all at the unsung archives..



Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on August 21, 2013, 04:13:16 am
Gjerstrom - Piano Concerto No. 2, 'By the Sea - Sea Moods', 1936
Glass L. - Symphony No. 3, in D Major, 'Forest Symphony', 1901
Glass L. - Fantasia, 1913
Bresgen - Totentanz, for Piano & Small Orchestra, 1958
Pavlov - Symphony No. 1, 'Siberia'
Pavlov - Symphony No. 2
Shymko - Piano Concerto No. 2, 2006-9
Shymko - Offlife, for Chamber Orchestra & Electronics, 2013
Lubchenko - Piano Concerto No. 4, 2010
Kolodub - Symphony No. 3, 'In the Ukrainian Baroque Style', 1980
Tamberg - Concerto Grosso
Matchavariani - Symphony No. 2, 1972

Gentlemen,
As with all my discoveries: if you cannot find anywhere such works: at the cost only of your opinion, I can send you a copy: pm me.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on August 21, 2013, 05:23:17 pm
Mr. Sbookman - much appreciated, thanks - found Gjerstrom, Bresgen, Shymko & Lubchenko, all new to me, on YT. Pavlov's on classical music online, as is Kolodub; will download them later.
A terrific post, thanks !


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SerAmantiodiNicolao on August 26, 2013, 05:01:03 pm
The 8 symphonies of the Croatian composer Stjepan Sulek were a great recent find for me.
I find his music fascinating, cleverly inventive and quite unique.
I agree totally and hope for more cd releases i found particularly impressive 2 and 7
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/STJEPAN-SULEK-symphonies-3-8-concerts-1-2-4-CROATIAN-BRAND-NEW-DOUBLE-CD-/00/s/MTAwMFgxNDAw/$(KGrHqJ,!q4F!-hRHibwBQf!Rhs6h!~~60_58.JPG)

I can't find any of his symphonies for purchase online especially the "impressive 2 and 7" if you can provide link?

Do you know, I think I actually have this set.  From some years back...I was in Croatia in 2005.  That's where I picked it up.  Can't say I remember it too well.

Although speaking of Pavle Despalj, I also picked up a two-disc set of his music on that trip.  And that I liked a great deal.  I'll see if I can find it when I get home...


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Vandermolen on August 26, 2013, 05:58:59 pm
Thanks to Kyle and Colin here my discovery this year has been Freitas Branco Symphony No 4. Having purchased some of the earlier symphonies on Naxos, I was disappointed, finding them as 'not as good as Braga Santos' but my hasty and ill-informed judgment was corrected by the towering Symphony No 4, an epic work of considerable slumbering power which I have played over and over again.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on August 26, 2013, 08:12:34 pm
Thanks to Kyle and Colin here my discovery this year has been Freitas Branco Symphony No 4. Having purchased some of the earlier symphonies on Naxos, I was disappointed, finding them as 'not as good as Braga Santos' but my hasty and ill-informed judgment was corrected by the towering Symphony No 4, an epic work of considerable slumbering power which I have played over and over again.

Excellent, Jeffrey! Pleased I could lead you to this wonderful piece :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on September 02, 2013, 06:13:48 pm
Ustvolskaya - Symphony No. 1, 1955
Kossenko - Piano Concerto, Op. 23
Ivanov K. - Cosmic Symphony
Levina - Piano Concerto No. 2
Olah - Symphony No. 4
Rybnikov - Symphony No. 6, 2008
Kats-Chernin - Piano Concerto No. 2
Sallinen - Shadows, Prelude for Orchestra, Op. 52, 1982
Sallinen - Chorali
Markelov - 'Clouds Of Creation,' Bell Symphony No. 15
Adams - China Gates, Op. 1, 1977
Pelécis - Concertino Bianco, for Piano & Chamber Orchestra, 1984

Gentlemen,
As with all my discoveries: if you cannot find anywhere such works: at the cost only of your opinion, I can send you a copy: pm me.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on September 02, 2013, 07:56:35 pm
A lovely evening spent tracking down a good few of these, and assorted offshoots - thank you !


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on September 02, 2013, 11:48:06 pm
IMHO a striking work well balanced between dark and elegiac mood.It reminds in some ways Levina's Second on the same subject.
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0000/955/MI0000955323.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on September 24, 2013, 07:29:31 pm
IMHO a striking work well balanced between dark and elegiac mood.It reminds in some ways Levina's Second on the same subject.
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0000/955/MI0000955323.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
I agree totally!! Lloyd's fine concertos are highly underrated and I think among his best works..and they do not suffer from some of the banality encountered in some of the symphonies.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on October 02, 2013, 04:59:23 am
Gentlemen,
As with all my discoveries: if you cannot find anywhere such works: at the cost only of your opinion, (of which, so far, - requests and criticisms, - I have received, - both roughly and exactly, - none, zippo, zilch, nada), I can send you a copy: pm me.

Hajiyev - Symphony No. 4, 1952-6
Elfman - Nightmare Before Christmas, 1993
Klami - Concerto No. 2, for Piano & String Orchestra, Op. 41
Rääts - Sonata for Two Pianos, Op. 82, 1990
Reznicek - Donna Diana Overture, 1894
Khatchaturian - Concerto for Cello & Orchestra, 1946
Nyman - Harpsichord Concerto
Nyman - Memorial
Bloch - Schelomo, 1916
Kabalevsky - Violin Concerto, 1948
Khanon - A Certain Concerto
Lutoslawski - Concerto For Orchestra, 1954


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: jimfin on October 02, 2013, 06:09:53 am
I quite agree about Lloyd's concertos, all magnificent and little heard, even compared to his symphonies. The Third is a masterpiece!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on December 31, 2013, 07:08:31 am
Gentlemen,

Anisimoff - Symphony No. 3, 'Sinfonia Piccola', Op. 33, 2004
Zaderatsky - Symphonic Picture, 'Plant'
Alizade - Symphony No. 3
Alizade - Symphony No. 4
Alizade - Symphony No. 5
Prostitov - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra No. 2, 'Doric'
Evangelista - Alap & Gat, for Chamber Orchestra
Douglas - Helvetia, a First Symphony for Orchestra, 1993
Ferrán - La Pasión de Cristo
Lourié - Symphony No. 1, 'Sinfonia Dialectica', 1930
Lourié - Symphony No. 2, 'Kormtchaia', 1936
Ustvolskaya - 'Dream of Stepan Razin', Epic for Bass & Orchestra


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Gauk on December 31, 2013, 08:23:00 am
Gentlemen,

Anisimoff - Symphony No. 3, 'Sinfonia Piccola', Op. 33, 2004
Zaderatsky - Symphonic Picture, 'Plant'
Alizade - Symphony No. 3
Alizade - Symphony No. 4
Alizade - Symphony No. 5
Prostitov - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra No. 2, 'Doric'
Evangelista - Alap & Gat, for Chamber Orchestra
Douglas - Helvetia, a First Symphony for Orchestra, 1993
Ferrán - La Pasión de Cristo
Lourié - Symphony No. 1, 'Sinfonia Dialectica', 1930
Lourié - Symphony No. 2, 'Kormtchaia', 1936
Ustvolskaya - 'Dream of Stepan Razin', Epic for Bass & Orchestra


So what are we to do with this list? Please either say something about these works or at least provide links to them. Otherwise you might as well post an extract from the local telephone directory.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on December 31, 2013, 10:22:18 am
Sir,

My discoveries are like an extract from a telephone directory?

Google search, sir; listen; form your own opinion. Or not.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: autoharp on December 31, 2013, 12:05:29 pm
Gentlemen
:o


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on December 31, 2013, 01:27:38 pm
Oh dear, may end up being my last post here !
Gentlemen, it's New Year's Eve - perhaps we don't always understand each other as best we might, but I for one come here to escape the cynicism & point-scoring of the 'real' world, maybe even of other 'erudite' forums.
'...decorous atmosphere full of freedom and delight';think I read that somewhere. I for one welcome Mr. Bookman's listings of works to discover, and have managed, with the odd hiccup along the way, to learn much from them. Will be hoping to uncover something from the latest 'batch'.
We'll always have our own favourites, and opinions, gentlemen( & ladies ?) and no harm in that, but let's be united by a love of the greatest music in the world....please !
A very Happy New Year to all colleagues here.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: autoharp on December 31, 2013, 02:45:10 pm
( & ladies ?)

Indeed!

A late candidate (discovered a few days ago) may turn out to be Henning Mankell's piano concerto
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSZgH0oqwFM

I couldn't make head or tail of this at first but am getting places on repeated listenings. Something similar happened a few years back with a double CD of his solo piano music.

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/192/MI0001192606.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Gauk on January 01, 2014, 02:23:58 pm
OK, let's take the thread title at its word. What is your DISCOVERY (single) of 2013? No lists, one item; the best of the best of the whole year.

I'll give you my answer - this forum!



Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on January 01, 2014, 03:41:37 pm
OK, let's take the thread title at its word. What is your DISCOVERY (single) of 2013? No lists, one item; the best of the best of the whole year.

I'll give you my answer - this forum!


Fine answer. Mr. G. - sadly can't claim AMF as a discovery this year....so will vote for another place where I've enjoyed spending time recently, the Reddit Classical sub-forums. Some posts there (as, I suppose, everywhere !) that are, for want of a better word, 'unworthy', but a surprising amount of good links and, to my untrained eye, knowledgeable input of all sorts.
Introduced me to my favourite piece at least in recent months: Golijov, 3 songs for soprano & orchestra (with Dawn Upshaw, which always helps!).


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: shamus on January 11, 2014, 02:17:01 am
I was given a recording of Dora Bright's lovely concerto, the pianist very good, the orchestra not so much--this is one of my favorites of last year. Also found music by Dilorom Saidaminova on YouTube. Very hard to narrow down!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Elroel on January 11, 2014, 10:39:04 am
I bought the cpo version and as expected it sounds (technically) much better.
Musically though, so far I like the 1947 version better (only after a first listen to the cpo disc).

Very glad cpo decided to bring all his symphonies!




Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Elroel on January 11, 2014, 02:35:54 pm
While I'm writing this I listen to Paul McCartney's ballet 'Ocean's Kingdom'.
Until now, this is my first discovery of the year 2014.
Though this file is audio only, I can imagine the dancers on stage!

You find it here:  http://classic-online.ru/uploads/79900/79859.mp3

In my orignal post I clipped and pasted the apparently with closed eyes. So it is McPhee where it's about.
I'm deeply sorry misleading you guys.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SerAmantiodiNicolao on January 11, 2014, 05:56:58 pm
OK, let's take the thread title at its word. What is your DISCOVERY (single) of 2013? No lists, one item; the best of the best of the whole year.

I'll give you my answer - this forum!



I'll take that as my answer too, then.  Mainly because I can't remember what, exactly, I've listened to this year as opposed to last year, or the year before, or the year before that...  ;D


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 12, 2014, 12:22:52 am
IMHO two engaging works
(http://claude.torres1.perso.sfr.fr/GhettosCamps/Internement/GreatBritain/Reizenstein/DuttonCDLX7282.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SerAmantiodiNicolao on January 12, 2014, 05:41:10 am
I was given a recording of Dora Bright's lovely concerto, the pianist very good, the orchestra not so much--this is one of my favorites of last year. Also found music by Dilorom Saidaminova on YouTube. Very hard to narrow down!

May one inquire whence came the recording?  I've always wanted to hear something of Bright's, but wasn't aware of any recent performances.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Elroel on January 12, 2014, 04:20:46 pm
Dutton Epoch CDLX 7282

This is the label nr. of the Bates/Reizenstein cd. It came on the market in 2012


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on January 12, 2014, 08:01:39 pm
Dutton Epoch CDLX 7282

This is the label nr. of the Bates/Reizenstein cd. It came on the market in 2012

It definitely was my discovery of the year - 2012! :-)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on January 12, 2014, 09:25:08 pm
Sir,

My discoveries are like an extract from a telephone directory?

Google search, sir; listen; form your own opinion. Or not.

thread title - "Your Discovery of the Year"
Perhaps it is very hard to pick one But 25-30??
It's hard to focus on such a huge volume..I think that is all that Gauk is saying..


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: chill319 on January 13, 2014, 12:36:16 am
2013 was, again, a year of discoveries for me. Most of these would have been old news to other members of this forum -- save, perhaps, for one. I think Bax's Concertino for Piano and Orchestra, as realized by Graham Parlett, is the most indispensable such work I have encountered outside the domain of Bruckner 9 and Mahler 10.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on April 01, 2014, 02:34:08 pm
Gentlemen,

Shaverzashvili - 'Mtkvar', Symphonic Picture, 1958
Martinet - 'Le triomphe de la Mort', Symphonie Dramatique, 1967-73
Foulds - Dynamic Triptych, - 1
Alizade - Violin Concerto
Gholmieh - Abreeshi, Procession
Tormis - Estonian Ballads, Cantata-Ballet
Zwilich - Celebration for Orchestra, 1984
Ajdic - Symphony No. 2, 'Window of the Soul', 1992
Kancheli - Symphony No. 4 - 'In Memoria di Michelangelo'
Nosyrev - Symphony No. 4, 1980
Shchedrin - 'Dialogues with Shostakovich', Symphonic Etudes
Slonimsky - Symphony No. 27, 'Lyrical', 2009


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on April 05, 2014, 06:48:57 am
2013 was, again, a year of discoveries for me. Most of these would have been old news to other members of this forum -- save, perhaps, for one. I think Bax's Concertino for Piano and Orchestra, as realized by Graham Parlett, is the most indispensable such work I have encountered outside the domain of Bruckner 9 and Mahler 10.
thanks for being specific..i'll be sure to tap this one..the lists I generally ignore


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: chill319 on April 07, 2014, 11:48:26 pm
Quote
.the lists I generally ignore
Understood. Na'theless here's my personal list of indispensable late Bax: the Rhapsodic Ballad for solo 'cello (one British cellist told me [long ago] that its bold profile put her in mind of Britten's late cello solo pieces); the Concertino realized by Graham Partlett, the cello sonata; and the Piano Trio, especially as played by Ensemble Avalon.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on August 22, 2014, 05:11:43 am
Gentlemen,

Zimmer J. - Piano Concerto No. 3, 1958
Castillo - Concerto for 2 Pianos & Orchestra.mp3
Mustonen - Sonata for Violin & Orchestra, 2013
Stikhin - Piano Concerto
Nortman - Piano Concerto No. 2
Nortman - Piano Concerto No. 3
Blatný - Symphony, 1984
Avramovski - Symphony, 'Summer'
Rabinovitch-Barakovsky - Maithuna, Sinfonia Concertante, for Orchestra, 2005
Rabinovitch-Barakovsky - Musique Populaire, 1980
Pavlorek - Echoes, for Organ & Clarinet Quartet
Hajiyev - Symphony No. 4, 'Lenin', 1952-6


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on March 07, 2015, 05:04:14 am
Gentlemen,

Tošic - Motus
Prostitov - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra No. 4
Hirsch - Symphony No. 2, 'Defensa'
Hirsch - Symphony No. 3, 'Brands of Tyranny'
Reinberger - Symphony No. 2, in F Minor, 1958
Kabelác - Symphony No. 4, 'Chamber Symphony', Op. 36, 1954-58
Rautio - Piano Concerto No. 2, 1971
Rota - Fellini's Roma - Catholic Church Fashion Show, 1972
Sallinen - Symphony No. 1, Op. 24
Sallinen - The Nocturnal Dances of Don Juanquixote, for Strings
Tveitt - Concerto No. 1 for Hardanger Fiddle & Orchestra, Op. 163, 1955
Tveitt - Concerto No. 2 for Hardanger Fiddle & Orchestra, 'Three Fjords', Op. 252, 1965


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on March 07, 2015, 01:09:30 pm
(http://www.pcxserver.de/mdm/images/product_images/popup_images/1770_1.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jolly Roger on March 08, 2015, 08:52:55 am
The music (esp symphonies) of Anders Nilsson, from Swedish radio posts..
Derek Bourgeois is also at the top of my list for last year.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on October 24, 2015, 09:26:26 am
Gentlemen,

Zuleta - Symphony No. 4, 'Del Caffe', 1963
Gyöngyösi - Symphony No. 4
Kisielewski - Symphony in a Square, 1978
Bunin R. - Piano Concerto, Op. 34, 1963
Smolsky - Symphony No. 10
Popov G. - Symphony No. 6, 'Festive'
Gholmieh - Symphony No. 1
Gholmieh - Symphony No. 2
Dalbavie - Trio No. 1, for Violin, Cello, & Piano, 2008
Antonyuk - Symphony No. 4, 2014
Antonyuk - Piano Concerto No. 1
del Aguila - Piano Concerto, Op. 57, 1997


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on October 31, 2015, 03:15:46 am
She was the less known member of "Le Six"

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61OZ%2BwKKSaL._SL500_.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on November 04, 2015, 01:57:38 am
Aminoullah Hussein (1905, Samarkand – 9 August 1983, Paris) was a celebrated Iranian composer of Neo-Romantic music.
His mother was a Persian woman from Samarkand (present-day Uzbekistan) and his father was a merchant, originally from Azerbaijan. Aminollah Hossein lived for a few years in Persia (Iran) before he left the country for his academic studies.

(From Last.FM, edited)

I don't know if is a new release
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/19/1b/87/191b871c017489ba61547060e2af161b.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on April 12, 2016, 04:49:49 pm
Gentlemen,

Podgaiskaja - Uroboros, Concerto for Symphony Orchestra
Podgaiskaja - The Fog, for Orchestra & Organ, 2014
Popov G. - Symphony No. 5, 'Pastoral', Op. 77, 1956
Rabinovitch-Barakovsky - Incantations, 1996
Sallinen - Sinfonia, 1971
Hlavác - Symphonic Poem, 'Héró a Leandros', 1987
Ajdic - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra, 1988
Adams J.C. - Hoodoo Zephyr, 1993
Görner - Piano Concerto, in A minor, 1952
Evangelista - O Bali, for Piano, Vibraphone, 2 Flutes, 2 Violins, Cello, & Double Bass, 1989
Bunin R. - Ten Days That Shook The World, (1967 film), Op. 39
Bunin R. - Concerto in G Minor, for Chamber Orchestra, Op. 33, 1961


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Elroel on April 12, 2016, 07:39:33 pm
Well, let's see:

Sofar this year:

Rautavaara's 2nd Cello Cto  (on Ondine ODE 1178-2)

Franz Mixa: Symphonies 2, 3 and 5 (on Antes BM 31.9252, resp. on BM 31.9270).





Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: autoharp on April 12, 2016, 08:50:52 pm
Gentlemen

And Ladies?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: calyptorhynchus on April 12, 2016, 10:26:59 pm
My discovery of the year, a negative one, even the very greatest composers sometimes make bad artistic mistakes: Holmboe, Requiem for Nietszche... seriously, don't bother, or if you do, don't read the translation of the libretto.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: georghann on April 12, 2016, 10:29:52 pm
Peter Maxwell-Davies's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra on Sony BMG (A. Prévin/I. Stern). An old recording but what a find!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on April 12, 2016, 11:06:50 pm
Wonderful lyrical
(http://pmcdn.priceminister.com/photo/pages-symphoniques-ebauche-symphonique-essai-pour-ballet-pages-romantiques-tantsawai-conecerto-en-la-amertume-cadence-maurice-lissac-orchestre-national-de-l-opera-de-paris-908372057_L.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Gauk on April 13, 2016, 12:14:16 pm
It's only April! Maybe this thread should be relaunched as "discovery of the month".


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on July 02, 2016, 05:08:17 pm
Gentlemen,

Dovgan - Symphony No. 3, 1992
Kalnins I. - Symphony No. 7, 2016
Jaroch - Symphony No. 2, 1958-60
Balakauskas - Symphony No. 2, 1979
Zhvanetskaya - Piano Concerto
Rivilis - Bourdons, Two Poems for Orchestra, 1984
Rivilis - Symphonic Dances, 1969
Paladi - Piano Concerto, 1989
Kleiberg - Symphony No. 1, 'The Bell Reef', 1997
Kolodub Z. - Piano Concerto, 1971
Pavlova - Symphony No. 6, 2008
Hofman - Musica Concertante, 1993


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on July 03, 2016, 01:10:49 am
A good music cd from a famous novelist

(http://www.hbdirect.com/coverm/thumbnails/747313347278.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: BrianA on July 03, 2016, 03:49:41 am
That's a pretty Trumpian hair style, is it not?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cilgwyn on July 03, 2016, 12:44:38 pm
I enjoyed 'discovering' Sacheverell Coke;and the fact that he was allot more interesting than York Bowen......imho please note! You've had your time in the sun Bowen fans,now it's time for some Coke (and not that kind,I should point out!)! :o ;D
I also enjoyed listening to some of Gounod's other operas. Mireille and The Bleeding Nun (language please! ;D) La Nonne Sanglante. And I mean enjoyed! I thought the latter was one of the best Cpo opera rediscoveries. A bit of a pity about that slightly nasal sounding tenor;but his singing has an earnest quality and conviction and the overall performance is very good indeed! Great cover photo too!! :o ;D
I also bought the Lyrita set of Tippett's The Midsummer Marriage. I had some battered old ex-lib Lp's of this once,which I bought s/h from a market stall. It didn't do much for me at the time. (Actually,it was probably the scartchy old Lps) I only bought it this time,bcause I was trying to think of another English opera to add to my collection. Anyway,I put the cd set on and suddenly I was hooked on Tippett. I ended up buying the Chandos and Decca sets of the symphonies,the Hyperion set of the Piano Concerto and Piano Sonatas,A Child of our Time,various orchestral works. Phew!! ::) ;D I also went out on a Mozart,Richard Strauss opera binge! The shelves are groaning. And so am I..........at the expense!! (And Richard Strauss operas?!!! What's happening to me?!!! :o ;D)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Vandermolen on July 13, 2016, 10:43:46 am
John Veale's Symphony 2 on Dutton rates highly as does Kabalevsky Piano Concerto No.1 (Chandos).


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on July 14, 2016, 08:05:23 pm
A perhaps minor, but nevertheless sincere, discovery for me is the music of Eivind Groven (1901-77). Both his First 'Innover viddene' (1938) and Second 'Midnattstimen' (1946) symphonies are fine, introspective and somewhat dreamy works without the great dramatic gesture of those by his contemporary Saeverud, but I enjoy them very much. Just like his later 'Norwegian dances', Symfoniske slĺttar No. 1, Op. 43 (1956) and Faldafeykir No. 2, Op. 53 (1965).

Am now waiting for an older Aurora CD, with his setting of the Draumkvćdet (Op. 51, 1963) for choir and orchestra, to arrive.



Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on July 22, 2016, 12:59:06 am
Great addiction
(http://picscdn.redblue.de/doi/pixelboxx-mss-70508671/fee_786_587_png/The-Rte-Concert-Orchestra---British-Celebration---(CD))


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on July 22, 2016, 08:46:52 am
Great addiction
(http://picscdn.redblue.de/doi/pixelboxx-mss-70508671/fee_786_587_png/The-Rte-Concert-Orchestra---British-Celebration---(CD))
All seven composers are rather unknown - at least to me. What do you think are the most interesting pieces in this collection? [BTW strange typo in 'Palaestina']


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on July 23, 2016, 02:02:02 am
Great addiction
]
All seven composers are rather unknown - at least to me. What do you think are the most interesting pieces in this collection? [BTW strange typo in 'Palaestina']

Dear Christo
Spratley together Gregson and Derek Bourgeois is a well known composer of brass music.IMHO here could be Ketelbey's exoticism echoes
Gareth Glyn was in Naxos cd of Welsh music heavily influenced from folk music.
David Lyon's Piano Concerto is a conservative work like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24csZnXoRcI
Anthony Hedges is a quite established composer of "light music" with various recording on Naxos and Asv
Bryan Kelly was a Gordon Jacob's student IMHO influenced from him.

Best


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Elroel on July 29, 2016, 03:56:52 pm
In april, Autoharp, asked "what about women composers". I never replied.
I am a little ashamed that I forgot to mention Johanna Doderer.
With her compositions she made a great impression on me.
Her two symphonies, 2 violin concertos and a piano concerto, I love very much.




Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Vandermolen on August 12, 2016, 09:57:50 am
Veale: Symphony 2
Rootham: Symphony 2

The Veale is a powerful work showing, I think, some influence of Shostakovich. The Rootham completed in his final days and the last part dictated to his friend Patrick Hadley has the most unbearably moving final pages - a beautiful work and unsurprisingly quite different to his energetic and tuneful First Symphony.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on August 12, 2016, 03:51:52 pm
Veale: Symphony 2
Rootham: Symphony 2

The Veale is a powerful work showing, I think, some influence of Shostakovich. The Rootham completed in his final days and the last part dictated to his friend Patrick Hadley has the most unbearably moving final pages - a beautiful work and unsurprisingly quite different to his energetic and tuneful First Symphony.

Have you read the thread I started about the Veale No2, Jeffrey?

Not for the first time ;D it looks as if we are in complete agreement!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on August 26, 2016, 11:28:01 am
Veale: Symphony 2
Rootham: Symphony 2

The Veale is a powerful work showing, I think, some influence of Shostakovich. The Rootham completed in his final days and the last part dictated to his friend Patrick Hadley has the most unbearably moving final pages - a beautiful work and unsurprisingly quite different to his energetic and tuneful First Symphony.
I came to appreciate the Veale 2 just as highly as you do; big surprise of course.  8) Many thanks for alerting me again to the new Rootham. I must confess that Rootham 1 didn't make as big an impression on me than it did on you - in an earlier phase of your life, if I'm not mistaken  :) - but it's certainly music that I can love unconditionally and I'll try the Second ASAP.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on August 26, 2016, 11:28:48 am
Great addiction
]
All seven composers are rather unknown - at least to me. What do you think are the most interesting pieces in this collection? [BTW strange typo in 'Palaestina']

Dear Christo
Spratley together Gregson and Derek Bourgeois is a well known composer of brass music.IMHO here could be Ketelbey's exoticism echoes
Gareth Glyn was in Naxos cd of Welsh music heavily influenced from folk music.
David Lyon's Piano Concerto is a conservative work like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24csZnXoRcI
Anthony Hedges is a quite established composer of "light music" with various recording on Naxos and Asv
Bryan Kelly was a Gordon Jacob's student IMHO influenced from him.

Best

Great to learn and great to hear, many thanks!  :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on October 20, 2016, 10:37:39 pm
I've misjudged his work:
(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/6BgAAOSwFqJWlWag/s-l500.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on November 29, 2016, 01:02:37 am
(http://musicshop.ubc-bg.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/thumbnail2/300x303/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/s/t/staenov.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on December 29, 2016, 08:45:17 pm
It's probably cheating to name a radio station as my 'discovery' of the year - and I'm afraid for American colleagues, & probably a few others besides, Q2 radio from WQXR New York isn't that amazing at all.
But for an ignorant Brit, it's the best constant 'contemporary' station I've encountered.....unless of course anyone knows better ?

http://www.wqxr.org/#!/series/q2/

Happy New Year listening to all !


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: M. Yaskovsky on January 09, 2017, 02:50:53 pm
The 8 symphonies by Miroslav Kabelac on Supraphon


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on January 14, 2017, 07:18:49 pm
The symphonic music of Norwegian Eivind Groven (1901-1977), especially: 
   Symphony No. 1, Op. 26: Innover viddene ('Towards the Mountains') (1938, rev. 1951)
   Symphony No. 2, Op. 34: Midnattstimen ('The midnight hour') (1946)
   Symfoniske slĺttar  No. 1, Op. 43 (1956)
   Faldafeykir No. 2 (Symfoniske slĺttar No. 2), Op. 53 (1965)
   Draumkvćdet (for soloists, choir and orchestra) Op. 51 (1963)

Not the 'greatest' composer that I know, but one that I highly enjoy for his melodious and imaginative writing (not dissimilar to Geir Tveitt in times).


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: erato on January 15, 2017, 10:02:20 pm
Groven was also known for his experiments in perfect tuning. He even had built a perfectly tuned organ for his home in Oslo, I was there for a concert in the late 70ies. I like the BIS CD of the symphonies a lot, you should try the BIS CD of von Koch symphonies, I find a lot of similarities.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on February 13, 2017, 01:04:00 am
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61NKJhItirL.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on February 13, 2017, 03:38:28 pm
Groven was also known for his experiments in perfect tuning. He even had built a perfectly tuned organ for his home in Oslo, I was there for a concert in the late 70ies. I like the BIS CD of the symphonies a lot, you should try the BIS CD of von Koch symphonies, I find a lot of similarities.
Great to learn about your personal experiences with Groven! Also many thanks for the tip, Erland von Koch is on my radar since long, but I hesitated to buy the symphonies. Will oblige now.  :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Christo on March 05, 2017, 11:51:38 am
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61NKJhItirL.jpg)

Have this one; do you like it?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on March 26, 2017, 03:04:34 pm
His flamboyant piano concerto would deserve a new performance
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81zz0icbY2L._SX522_.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on May 12, 2017, 02:35:56 am
IMHO Highly reccomended ,beatiful music well performed
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91bR4ifpcQL._SY355_.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: cjvinthechair on May 12, 2017, 06:35:14 pm
IMHO Highly reccomended ,beatiful music well performed
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91bR4ifpcQL._SY355_.jpg)
Yes - found it on-line with a bit of research; good 'steer', thanks !


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on May 19, 2017, 06:10:04 am
Gentlemen,

Fagerlund - Isola, for Symphony Orchestra, 2007
Ciglič - The Shore of Dancers, 1953
Weinberg - Symphony No. 12, Op. 114, 1975-6
Lubchenko - Small Concert Music, for Piano & Orchestra, Op. 43, 2004
Viktorova - 'Towards the Rhythm', for Orchestra, 2003
Bunin R. - Concert Symphony, for Violin & Orchestra, Op. 43, 1972
Zhukov - Silentium, Piano Concerto, 2001
Zhukov - Mystery Concert, for Violin, Cello, Piano, & Orchestra, 1995
Volans - Kneeling Dances, 1992
Adigezalov - Piano Concerto No. 2, 1964
Gagnebin - Piano Concerto, 1931
Elfman - Serenada Schizophrana, 2004


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on May 20, 2017, 12:27:34 am
He has a great mastery of orchestral tableaux
(https://i.ytimg.com/vi/degry6H6s3k/hqdefault.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Zoo In Budapest on August 03, 2017, 08:57:35 am
Love this piece! Jūros Legenda by Juozas Karosas. The original recording from 1965 features Aleksandras Livontas and Olga Šteinbergaitė



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_Y_f-b0L30


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: calyptorhynchus on December 25, 2017, 09:00:43 am
My discovery of the year is that you can gain much more understanding of music if you try to compose yourself.

You can download a free program called MuseScore (Mac or Windows), and it allows you to lay out a score and input notes &c, you can listen to what you have written in midi sound (not great, but entertaining), export your work as a Pdf score, or an mp3 of the midi sound.

I started with this program in early 2017 and started off by composing a String Trio (mainly to teach myself how to use the program) and since October have been working on a symphony!

The point is that even though one's own work may be of no worth, it really makes you listen in a different way to music because you have been there and done that. I find it makes me further in awe of the great composers (thinking: how they possibly sustain this level of inspiration?), but even less sympathetic to composers I don't like, because now their music sounds clunkier, more disjointed and even less inspired than before.

Give it a go!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Amphissa on January 03, 2018, 12:38:17 am
Love this piece! Jūros Legenda by Juozas Karosas. The original recording from 1965 features Aleksandras Livontas and Olga Šteinbergaitė
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_Y_f-b0L30

Wow! I had never heard of the composer or the musicians. Really quite interesting. You mention a commercial recording. I don't find it on Amazon US or Ebay. Is it available? Variant spellings?




Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 04, 2018, 11:53:05 pm
(http://www.patogupirkti.lt/out/pictures/z1/juozas-karosas_z1.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Amphissa on January 05, 2018, 08:19:46 pm
(http://www.patogupirkti.lt/out/pictures/z1/juozas-karosas_z1.jpg)

I don't see this on Ebay or Amazon. A hint where I might find it?


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on January 05, 2018, 11:15:23 pm
(http://www.patogupirkti.lt/out/pictures/z1/juozas-karosas_z1.jpg)

I don't see this on Ebay or Amazon. A hint where I might find it?

Dear Amphissa
Here:
http://www.patogupirkti.lt/knyga/Juozas-Karosas-CD-ir-DVD.html
Best


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on February 05, 2018, 02:43:29 pm
Gentlemen,

Bosso - Sinfonia No. 1, 'Oceans'
Hovhaness - Symphony No. 25, 'Odysseus Symphony', Op. 275, 1973
Arnold - Concerto for Two Pianos, (three hands), & Orchestra, Op. 104, 1969
Sünder - Concerto for Timpani & Orchestra
Kancheli - Symphony No. 6, 1978-80
Lukáš - Partita in C, for Chamber Orchestra, 1969
Rääts - Concerto for Two Pianos & Orchestra, 1986
Volans - Concerto for Piano & Winds, 1995
Volans - Symphony, 'Daar Kom Die Alibama', 2010
Balassa - Phantasy for Harp & String Orchestra, Op. 76
Kabeláč - Metamorphosis II, for Piano & Orchestra, Op. 58, 1979
Sculthorpe - Piano Concerto, 1983


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on February 06, 2018, 10:54:30 pm
IMHO best recording of this work
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51ql%2Bcq%2BTNL._SY355_.jpg)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Amphissa on February 18, 2018, 06:21:56 pm
IMHO best recording of this work
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51ql%2Bcq%2BTNL._SY355_.jpg)

The only other recording I'm familiar with is Svetlanov's. Do you know of any other recordings?



Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on February 19, 2018, 12:53:31 am
Svetlanov recording are considered Landmark for this composer.Sadly sound quality is sometimes poor and the sound lack of depth (this is a limit also of recent Melodiya Anthology),IMHO this is a more recent reconding and benefit of modern restore,also orchestra seems react to this conductor with some passion.Sadly webpage of this label is offline,so i can't say if it was an integral alternative version of Myaskovsky symphonies.
Best
P.S.
I listened also Dudarova , Ivanov and Yablonsky :IMHO are less convicing


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Amphissa on February 19, 2018, 04:31:25 am
Svetlanov recording are considered Landmark for this composer.Sadly sound quality is sometimes poor and the sound lack of depth (this is a limit also of recent Melodiya Anthology),IMHO this is a more recent reconding and benefit of modern restore,also orchestra seems react to this conductor with some passion.Sadly webpage of this label is offline,so i can't say if it was an integral alternative version of Myaskovsky symphonies.
Best
P.S.
I listened also Dudarova , Ivanov and Yablonsky :IMHO are less convicing

Huh? Dudarova , Ivanov and Yablonsky conduct the 26th? Where? When? What label? If broadcast, please upload.

The 26th conducted by Nikolayev is easy to find. All these others, I never heard of. Only Svetlanov and Nikolayev 26th.






Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Toby Esterhase on February 19, 2018, 11:48:12 pm
Svetlanov recording are considered Landmark for this composer.Sadly sound quality is sometimes poor and the sound lack of depth (this is a limit also of recent Melodiya Anthology),IMHO this is a more recent reconding and benefit of modern restore,also orchestra seems react to this conductor with some passion.Sadly webpage of this label is offline,so i can't say if it was an integral alternative version of Myaskovsky symphonies.
Best
P.S.
I listened also Dudarova , Ivanov and Yablonsky :IMHO are less convicing

Huh? Dudarova , Ivanov and Yablonsky conduct the 26th? Where? When? What label? If broadcast, please upload.

The 26th conducted by Nikolayev is easy to find. All these others, I never heard of. Only Svetlanov and Nikolayev 26th.





Dear Amphissa.Clearly i was speaking of all Myaskovsky's cycle.IMHO one of the reason of his scarce diffusion outside Russia is scarce sound quality of recordings.
Truly before this i didn't know Nikolaev as conductor
Best


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Amphissa on February 20, 2018, 02:20:52 am
Ah! Okay!
I have been collecting Myaskovsky recordings for many years. The only complete cycle of the symphonies is by Svetlanov. It is good to have his set, because it includes the *only* recordings of Symphonies 3, 4, 13, 14, 18 and 20. However, in many cases, if there are other recordings, Svetlanov leaves much to be desired. For example, his recordings of 5 and 6 are very bad. We are lucky to have other recordings, especially of these two great works.

In addition to the conductors you mention, many other conductors have recorded one or more Myaskovsky symphonies --
Rozhdestvensky
Rabl
Downes
Manolov
Kondrashin
Liss
Ginzberg
Halasz
Stankovsky
Gauk
Mikailov
Sergeyev
Gould
Ormandy
Kovalev

Nikoleyev also conducted a recording of Symphony 21, but others are better.

As for Myaskovsky's other orchestral works, there are many recordings of the violin concerto and cello concerto, of course, but also his many other orchestral works. Svetlanov made the only recording of some of these, but others have been recorded by multiple conductors.




Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Vandermolen on April 04, 2018, 07:48:01 am
I like Kondrashin's performances of Miaskovsky's music. His Symphony 6 (Russian Disc recording) is in a class of its own despite the aged acoustics.
Discovery of the year:
Fricker 'The Vision of Judgment' (thanks to cilgwyn of this forum for alerting me to its qualities).

An earlier discovery which means a lot to me is Maximilian Steinberg's Symphony 4 (Dutton CD).


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on December 28, 2018, 04:48:07 pm
Hi all, I'm finally on break now so I'll have some time to post here! Anyway, I’ve made many great musical discoveries this year, but I think the finest of all them has been the Symphonie (1952) by Jean-Michel Damase (1928-2013). Its language is resolutely tonal, sharing some stylistic similarities with, say, Honegger, but possessing a compellingly individual voice. It’s a deeply uplifting and memorable work that begins ominously, but eventually the opening mysterious, chromatic theme is transformed into a radiant C major with the horn entrance around 8 minutes in. The final few minutes of the first movement have become one of my very favorite passages in music - a gloriously ecstatic musical "sunset" that lingers in the memory. The slow movement is haunting and soulful, and the finale is rhythmically energetic and ends with a triumphant reminiscence of the first movement. In short, this is a superbly life-affirming and memorable work that will make you want to shout from the rooftops! Despite the work’s greatness, it has only received one recording (on Dutton Epoch with the BBC Concert Orchestra under Martin Yates - fortunately a very fine performance) and is unknown to most listeners. It is pretty unfathomable to me that orchestras will continue to churn out their 1000th performances of Beethoven’s 5th and Tchaikovsky’s 4th yet completely neglect such a great work as this.

https://www.amazon.com/Damase-Piano-Concerto-Concertino-Symphonie/dp/B00M2D7MY0/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1546145042&sr=1-1&keywords=damase+symphonie


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on December 29, 2018, 06:29:06 pm
Welcome back, Kyle :)

I cannot quite share your enormous enthusiasm for the Damase Symphony. It is certainly a most attractive and appealing work-a match of Faure and Poulenc-but I am afraid that it doesn't quite grip me in the way it obviously does you.

However, given your evident enthusiasm, I did go back to the Dutton cd and listen to the work again. And that is what such a recommendation should do!!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on December 29, 2018, 08:51:28 pm
I have only just realised that you have posted a link to the actual Dutton recording of the Damase symphony, Kyle.

Please remove it!! We went through the mill with this issue a few months back (as you may not realise!). The Dutton recording can be purchased.....and should be purchased. We cannot prevent those interested in sampling it from going to You Tube but we do not post such entire recordings on here.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on December 30, 2018, 04:43:36 am
I have only just realised that you have posted a link to the actual Dutton recording of the Damase symphony, Kyle.

Please remove it!! We went through the mill with this issue a few months back (as you may not realise!). The Dutton recording can be purchased.....and should be purchased. We cannot prevent those interested in sampling it from going to You Tube but we do not post such entire recordings on here.

My apologies Colin! I did not realize that was a policy here. I will remove it right away and replace it with an Amazon link instead. :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on December 30, 2018, 04:54:50 am
Welcome back, Kyle :)

I cannot quite share your enormous enthusiasm for the Damase Symphony. It is certainly a most attractive and appealing work-a match of Faure and Poulenc-but I am afraid that it doesn't quite grip me in the way it obviously does you.

However, given your evident enthusiasm, I did go back to the Dutton cd and listen to the work again. And that is what such a recommendation should do!!

I find that beneath its Gallic elegance, the Damase Symphonie is a work of some depth and eloquence, not least in the struggle between light and dark in the first movement (when the light finally breaks through around 8 minutes in with the horn entrance it is such a glorious moment!!) and in the poignant lyricism of the second. I am occasionally reminded of Poulenc in the work, but more often of Honegger (in less abrasive mode) and some English composers (RVW, Bax, Rubbra), but, like I mentioned before, Damase has his own voice. BTW, it was Jeffrey (vandermolen) who initially recommended the work to me, so major hat tip to him! :)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Admin on December 30, 2018, 04:58:11 am
I have only just realised that you have posted a link to the actual Dutton recording of the Damase symphony, Kyle.

Please remove it!! We went through the mill with this issue a few months back (as you may not realise!). The Dutton recording can be purchased.....and should be purchased. We cannot prevent those interested in sampling it from going to You Tube but we do not post such entire recordings on here.

My apologies Colin! I did not realize that was a policy here. I will remove it right away and replace it with an Amazon link instead. :)

Your co-operation is warmly appreciated! If you take a look at the You Tube performances section of the forum you will find the threads and posts which relate to this issue and the lengthy discussion we had here at the time. I very much doubt that anyone will wish to re-open that discussion (I certainly don't!) but what finally emerged was a "firm line" (yes, I think we could call it a "policy") to which we have adhered since then.

Don't apologise, Kyle. There is no need. In some ways you can count yourself fortunate to have been "on holiday" (from the forum, I mean obviously :)) and did not have to live through the difficult times we had ::)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Jim on December 30, 2018, 08:16:25 pm
I find that beneath its Gallic elegance, the Damase Symphonie is a work of some depth and eloquence, not least in the struggle between light and dark in the first movement (when the light finally breaks through around 8 minutes in with the horn entrance it is such a glorious moment!!) and in the poignant lyricism of the second. I am occasionally reminded of Poulenc in the work, but more often of Honegger (in less abrasive mode) and some English composers (RVW, Bax, Rubbra), but, like I mentioned before, Damase has his own voice. BTW, it was Jeffrey (vandermolen) who initially recommended the work to me, so major hat tip to him! :)

Welcome back Kyle (I had an unfinished Atterberg thread when you left). I concur with you re this piece, thanks for the recommendation. As a long time devotee of Honegger symphonies from the 70s supraphon vinyl days, I warmed to it right away. There is something of the care-fee quality of S4, 'Deliciae Basilienses', the chorale that is the summation of S2, and the sunlight breaking through the clouds towards the end of 'Cantate de Noel' (composed 52/53!) that is akin to the spirit of the end of the first movement of this Damase Symphonie. As well as other French composers, interestingly, I hear a touch of Honegger's pupil Ned Rorem.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on December 31, 2018, 01:37:48 am
Welcome back Kyle (I had an unfinished Atterberg thread when you left). I concur with you re this piece, thanks for the recommendation. As a long time devotee of Honegger symphonies from the 70s supraphon vinyl days, I warmed to it right away. There is something of the care-fee quality of S4, 'Deliciae Basilienses', the chorale that is the summation of S2, and the sunlight breaking through the clouds towards the end of 'Cantate de Noel' (composed 52/53!) that is akin to the spirit of the end of the first movement of this Damase Symphonie. As well as other French composers, interestingly, I hear a touch of Honegger's pupil Ned Rorem.

Great to hear from you, Jim! :) I was just listening to Honegger's 'Cantate de Noel' around Christmastime and was also struck by the similarities in spirit with the contemporaneous Damase Symphonie - both compositions begin ominously but conclude on a note of uplifting radiance. Honegger had a real knack for effective "darkness-to-light" progressions in his compositions - not only in the "Cantate de Noel' and 2nd Symphony, but in the terribly moving coda of the 3rd Symphony, which serves as a benediction after all the darkness and anger that has come before it. Interesting that you mention Rorem - I see the stylistic connection now that you mention it! I really like his three symphonies, especially no. 1 which has a Gallic elegance suffused with a quintessentially American spirit.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on December 31, 2018, 01:19:57 pm
Honegger was one of the finest 20th century composers but-it seems to me-is still under-rated and, particularly recently, appears to have rather dropped off the radar. My impression is that his music is not performed often in the concert hall and that there have been fewer recordings of his music. It does not of course help that France does not have an equivalent of Dutton, Lyrita and Chandos in the UK, or CPO in Germany, or Dux in Poland or BIS in Sweden and does less than many other countries to disseminate its own music. Yes, I am aware of the Timpani record label but its output is rather limited (not a single disc of any music by Landowski, for example).

Kyle and Jim have referred to some of Honegger's symphonic and choral music. The symphonies are all in their different ways exceptionally fine works and the Christmas Cantata is a gorgeous piece of music. But there are so many shorter orchestral pieces I have heard which are also extremely impressive.

Honegger repays anyone who explores his music!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Grandenorm on December 31, 2018, 01:57:07 pm
Can anyone recommend a modern recording of "Le Roi David", please? I got to know this marvellous work on the LP set conducted by Ansermet (late 1950s, I think?), but I sold all my LPs ages ago. That recording is, of course, available on CD now, but I wondered if there was a more modern performance someone could recommend.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Dundonnell on December 31, 2018, 02:20:29 pm
Can anyone recommend a modern recording of "Le Roi David", please? I got to know this marvellous work on the LP set conducted by Ansermet (late 1950s, I think?), but I sold all my LPs ages ago. That recording is, of course, available on CD now, but I wondered if there was a more modern performance someone could recommend.

I have the Dutoit version on Erato-which is very good-but for comparative reviews of other performances (which I have not heard):

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/dec99/david.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/dec99/david.htm)

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2017/May/Honegger_David_MIR318.htm (http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2017/May/Honegger_David_MIR318.htm)


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: kyjo on December 31, 2018, 04:57:57 pm
Honegger was one of the finest 20th century composers but-it seems to me-is still under-rated and, particularly recently, appears to have rather dropped off the radar. My impression is that his music is not performed often in the concert hall and that there have been fewer recordings of his music. It does not of course help that France does not have an equivalent of Dutton, Lyrita and Chandos in the UK, or CPO in Germany, or Dux in Poland or BIS in Sweden and does less than many other countries to disseminate its own music. Yes, I am aware of the Timpani record label but its output is rather limited (not a single disc of any music by Landowski, for example).

Kyle and Jim have referred to some of Honegger's symphonic and choral music. The symphonies are all in their different ways exceptionally fine works and the Christmas Cantata is a gorgeous piece of music. But there are so many shorter orchestral pieces I have heard which are also extremely impressive.

Honegger repays anyone who explores his music!

You are quite right about Honegger, Colin - his status in the music world is not as high as it should be - but then again the same could be said about many composers. If one of his works is performed in the US, it’s most likely to be ‘Pacific 231’, which IMHO isn’t one of his strongest works. I’d be very lucky to come across a performance of one of his other works. Concerning other fine Honegger works, I love his gorgeously lyrical and witty Cello Concerto, as well as the all-too-brief ‘Pastorale d’été’, which conveys the heat of a summer’s day better than any work I know.


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: Grandenorm on December 31, 2018, 06:26:55 pm
Thanks very much, Colin. I think I will go for the Naxos. It has had good reviews and at budget price I'm not breaking the bank!


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on January 18, 2020, 03:39:34 am
Gentlemen,

Jesús Pinzón Urrea (1928-2016, Colombia) - Movimiento, 1987
Géza Frid (1904-89, Romania/Holland) - Rhythmical Studies, for Chamber Orchestra, Op. 58, 1959
Geirr Tveitt (1908-81, Norway) - Piano Concerto No. 3, 'Hommage to Brahms', Op. 126, 1933, 1947
Alireza Mashayekhi (b. 1940, Iran) - Persian Gardens, Op. 111, 2009±
David Maves (b. 1937, USA) - Concerto for 2 Pianos & Orchestra, 1983
Herbert Blendinger (b. 1936, Germany) - Piano Concerto, Op. 42, 1984
Marga Richter (b. 1926, USA) - Out of Shadows & Solitude, 1985
Meredith Willson (1902-84, USA) - Symphony No. 2, in F minor, 'The Missions of California', 1940
Boris Tishchenko (1939-2010, Russia) - Dante Symphony No. 1, 'Among the Living', Op. 123, No. 1, 1998
Emil Tabakov - (b. 1947, Bulgaria) - Symphony No. 3, 1988


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on June 07, 2020, 06:08:31 am
Gentlemen,

Hugo Lepnurm (1914-99, Estonia) - Piano Concerto, 1960
Sergey Zhukov (b. 1951, Russia) - Concerto Sacra, for Violin, Cello, Piano, & String Orchestra, 1997
Ann Carr-Boyd (b. 1938, Australia) - Piano Concerto No. 1, 1991
Boris Tchaikovsky (1925-1996, Russia) - Symphony No. 3, 'Sevastopol', 1980
Nigel Westlake (b. 1958, Australia) - Concerto for Oboe, 'Spirit of the Wild', 2016
Flint Juventino Beppe (b. 1973, Norway) - Double Concerto, 'Four Elements of Hedmark', Op. 85, 2011
Katy Abbott (b. 1971, Australia) - Symphony No. 1, 'Souls of Fire', 2004
Bohuslav Martinů (1890-1959, Czech) - Concerto for Piano & Orchestra No. 3, 1948
Benjamin Lees (1924-2010, USA) - Concerto for String Quartet & Orchestra, 1964
Roman Berger (b. 1930, Poland) - 'Memento After the Death of Miroslav Filip', for Orchestra, 1973


Title: Re: Your Discovery of the Year
Post by: SBookman on November 22, 2020, 04:39:35 pm
Gentlemen,

Alan Hovhaness (1911-2000, USA) - Symphony No. 45, for 2 Pianos & Orchestra, Op. 342, 1954
Enjott Schneider (b. 1950, Germany) - Symphony No. 7, 'Dunkelwelt Untersberg', (The Dark World of Untersberg), 2012
Mikis Theodorakis (b. 1925, Greece) - Suite No. 1, for Piano & Orchestra, AST 61, 1954-5
Olav Anton Thommessen (b. 1946, Norway) - Bull's Eye, a Symphonic Wrapping of Ole Bull's 'Violin Concerto in A Major', for Violin & Double Orchestra, 2003
Bengt Hambrćus (1928-2000, Sweden/Canada) - Piano Concerto, 1991-2
Harald Genzmer (1909-2007, Germany) - Symphony No. 1, 1957
Alexander Rabinovich-Barakovsky (b. 1945, Russia) - Motif Optimiste Suivi de sa Démystification et Ainsi de Suite, 1976
Horst Minkowski-Garrigues (1925-2000, Germany/Canada) - Piano Concerto, pre-1977
Theodore Antoniou (1935-2018, Greece) - Symphony No. 1
Pavel Rivilis (1936-2014, Ukraine/Moldavia) - Bourdon, Two Poems for Orchestra, 1984