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Swedish Music


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Author Topic: Swedish Music  (Read 3911 times)
Jolly Roger
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« Reply #45 on: March 05, 2014, 05:48:08 am »

Profound thanks to Karl Miller for supplying these Eklund recordings and to John (jowcol) for uploading them for us Smiley Smiley

Eklund was a remarkable composer. I happen to rate him up there with Allan Pettersson as one of the very best of the more modern but not avant-garde Swedish composers.
We already have the symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 11 but now we have added Nos. 2, 4, 5, and the Piano Concerto. Only the Ninth and Tenth symphonies elude us.

This will provide a wonderful opportunity to sample more of the music of a composer unaccountably ignored by commercial recording companies Roll Eyes Eklund is, apparently, of no interest to Robert von Bahr and BIS Sad

(With the You Tube additions of more previously unheard British music today has been like Christmas-time, unwrapping musical presents Smiley)

Yes, this is qute extraordinary and most welcome!!
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Latvian
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« Reply #46 on: March 05, 2014, 01:55:08 pm »

Quote from: Latvian on July 11, 2013, 06:15:03 pm
Quote
Lars-Erik Larsson (1908-1986)

Cello Concerto, Op. 37 (1946-47)
    in three movements, details unknown

  Guido Vecchi, cello
  Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra
  Stig Westerberg, conductor

http://www.mediafire.com/folder/ytvcdtppt135n/Larsson

from a Swedish Radio archival broadcast, never issued commercially to the best of my knowledge.
Thanks so much for providing this, can we assume the file is not the violin or viola concerto(it is named vc)

Yes. "Vc" is a standard abbreviation for violoncello. If it were violin I would have used "vn," and if it were viola I would have used "va."
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Latvian
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« Reply #47 on: March 05, 2014, 01:58:31 pm »

Quote
Eklund was a remarkable composer. I happen to rate him up there with Allan Pettersson as one of the very best of the more modern but not avant-garde Swedish composers.
We already have the symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 11 but now we have added Nos. 2, 4, 5, and the Piano Concerto. Only the Ninth and Tenth symphonies elude us.

I believe he wrote thirteen symphonies, in which case we're also lacking Nos. 12 & 13.

However, I'm with you, Colin -- thrilled to have all the others! Not so long ago, the only work of Eklund's I knew was the 6th Symphony, from the Swedish Discofil LP (and later CD). Never in my wildest imaginings did I think I would ever hear so many other works of Eklund's.
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« Reply #48 on: March 05, 2014, 09:47:19 pm »

Assuming that you mean the first movement of the Skold Symphony No.3, I ran two separate anti-virus checks on the file and received no reports of any problem.

I have however deleted the link, re-uploaded the movement and provided an entirely new link. I have also checked the new upload without any report of a problem.

Please let me know if you are still having problems.
sometimes viruses advertising adobe flash will suddenly appear on some web pages,I suspect they sometimes might be on the users computer.
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« Reply #49 on: March 06, 2014, 02:18:42 am »

Quote
Eklund was a remarkable composer. I happen to rate him up there with Allan Pettersson as one of the very best of the more modern but not avant-garde Swedish composers.
We already have the symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 6, 7, 8 and 11 but now we have added Nos. 2, 4, 5, and the Piano Concerto. Only the Ninth and Tenth symphonies elude us.

I believe he wrote thirteen symphonies, in which case we're also lacking Nos. 12 & 13.

However, I'm with you, Colin -- thrilled to have all the others! Not so long ago, the only work of Eklund's I knew was the 6th Symphony, from the Swedish Discofil LP (and later CD). Never in my wildest imaginings did I think I would ever hear so many other works of Eklund's.

Maybe sometimes I should check my own catalogues before making inaccurate pronouncements Embarrassed Embarrassed

You are quite correct Smiley As my online catalogue tells me there are the two late Symphonies-No. 12 "Frescoes" and No.13 "Sinfonia Bianca-Negra".
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« Reply #50 on: March 07, 2014, 12:38:33 am »

With reference to the recent Hans Eklund uploads, I can find no mention of a Piano Concerto amongst Eklund's works. There is however a work entitled "Musica da Camera IV" for Piano and Chamber Orchestra.

Given that the work we have been given is only ten minutes in duration and sounds very much as if it is scored for a chamber orchestra I guess that this is the piece we now have.

The other point I would make is that the Symphony No.4 "Hjalmar Brantig In Memoriam" at 27 minutes in length is considerably longer than the time quoted in my catalogue which was supplied with the Eklund downloads.
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« Reply #51 on: March 07, 2014, 03:01:27 pm »

The other point I would make is that the Symphony No.4 "Hjalmar Brantig In Memoriam" at 27 minutes in length is considerably longer than the time quoted in my catalogue which was supplied with the Eklund downloads.

That piece is a terrible artistic misjudgement. What I assume are recordings of speeches by Branting, separated by bits of music, do not make a symphony. However strongly Eklund felt about Branting, a purely musical memorial would have been a more fitting tribute to the man - and might have received a wider circulation.
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« Reply #52 on: March 07, 2014, 06:28:08 pm »

Yes...it is, Hjalmar Branting (not Brantig)-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hjalmar_Branting
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« Reply #53 on: March 12, 2014, 03:38:16 am »

Huge thanks to Sicmu for the Moses Pergament Jewish Song Symphony-his magnum opus-which I have been hoping for a very long time to get to hear Smiley
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« Reply #54 on: March 12, 2014, 01:15:03 pm »

Huge thanks to Sicmu for the Moses Pergament Jewish Song Symphony-his magnum opus-which I have been hoping for a very long time to get to hear Smiley

Yes indeed - it's on as I write; quite something thus far ! Thank you so much.
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Clive
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« Reply #55 on: March 12, 2014, 03:09:15 pm »

I agree it is a masterpiece, shame on the record companies that didn't make this "symphony" available on CD.

Regarding Eklund 6 on Youtube, it is actually my transfer I posted years ago on the forum (possibly UC) : it is funny to see the music coming back to the place it started and I wouldn't be surprised the Pergament follows the same path (as many of my posts).
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« Reply #56 on: March 12, 2014, 04:02:16 pm »

I posted this on another music forum two years ago:

Now here is a strange situation.

In the chapter on "Modern Music in Scandinavia" written by Bo Wallner and included in "European Music in the Twentieth Century"(rev. edition 1961; edited by Howard Hartog) Moses Pergament is grouped with his contemporaries Hilding Rosenberg(born 1892) and Gosta Nystroem(born 1890) as one of the central figures of Swedish music.

Yet Pergament was always an outsider. Born in Finland(then part of the Russian Empire) and a Jew, Pergament was never fully accepted within his adopted country of Sweden. He came in for systematic attack both by Peterson-Berger and Kurt Atterberg who denied him entry to the Swedish Society of Composers for many years on the spurious grounds that Pergament wasn't Swedish (despite the protests of Hilding Rosenberg on Pergament's behalf). In fact Pergament had grown up in Finland speaking Swedish and the hostility towards him, at least from Peterson-Berger, was clearly anti-Semitic.


Yet today Pergament has completely disappeared. His music is never heard. None of his concertos is on cd nor his magnum opus- the 1944 Choral Symphony. I had seen his name over the last 40 + years and never really enquired before into his ouput.

Pergament's Choral Symphony is "The Jewish Song" and is scored for soprano, tenor, chorus and orchestra and is over an hour and a half long. It was recorded by Caprice to Lp but has never been transferred to cd. There are concertos for Violin(1948), Piano No.1(1951-52), Two Violins and Chamber Orchestra(1954), Cello(1954-55), Viola(1964-65) and Piano No.2(1974-75).

Allan Pettersson-who barely rates a mention in the reference books of thirty years ago or so-has all his orchestral music recorded once(by cpo) and now probably twice(by Bis) but Pergament disappears into oblivion.

How fickle is the hand of musical fate


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« Reply #57 on: March 12, 2014, 10:11:43 pm »

Wonderful.......we now have the Moses Pergament Piano Concerto No.1 and Cello Concerto Smiley

Thanks to shamus Smiley
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« Reply #58 on: March 12, 2014, 11:07:44 pm »

I posted this on another music forum two years ago:

Now here is a strange situation.

In the chapter on "Modern Music in Scandinavia" written by Bo Wallner and included in "European Music in the Twentieth Century"(rev. edition 1961; edited by Howard Hartog) Moses Pergament is grouped with his contemporaries Hilding Rosenberg(born 1892) and Gosta Nystroem(born 1890) as one of the central figures of Swedish music.

Yet Pergament was always an outsider. Born in Finland(then part of the Russian Empire) and a Jew, Pergament was never fully accepted within his adopted country of Sweden. He came in for systematic attack both by Peterson-Berger and Kurt Atterberg who denied him entry to the Swedish Society of Composers for many years on the spurious grounds that Pergament wasn't Swedish (despite the protests of Hilding Rosenberg on Pergament's behalf). In fact Pergament had grown up in Finland speaking Swedish and the hostility towards him, at least from Peterson-Berger, was clearly anti-Semitic.


Yet today Pergament has completely disappeared. His music is never heard. None of his concertos is on cd nor his magnum opus- the 1944 Choral Symphony. I had seen his name over the last 40 + years and never really enquired before into his ouput.

Pergament's Choral Symphony is "The Jewish Song" and is scored for soprano, tenor, chorus and orchestra and is over an hour and a half long. It was recorded by Caprice to Lp but has never been transferred to cd. There are concertos for Violin(1948), Piano No.1(1951-52), Two Violins and Chamber Orchestra(1954), Cello(1954-55), Viola(1964-65) and Piano No.2(1974-75).

Allan Pettersson-who barely rates a mention in the reference books of thirty years ago or so-has all his orchestral music recorded once(by cpo) and now probably twice(by Bis) but Pergament disappears into oblivion.

How fickle is the hand of musical fate




Swedish radio sometimes features his music which I am quite impressed with.  I have passed a few things o to members as Coming Broadcasts but some links may now be expired.
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jowcol
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« Reply #59 on: March 13, 2014, 12:45:07 am »

Music of Torbjorn Lundquist


From the collection of Karl Miller

An interesting composer without enough recognition-- I like the dark noir touches in the end of the third symphony, and he's also quite the composer for the accordion, like Piazzolla.


Symphony 2 "For Freedom":
Swedish Radio SO/Stig Westerberg


Symphony 4 "Sinfonia Ecologica":
Goteborg SO/Sixten Ehrling



Additional Lunquist works from Youtube:


Symfoni nr 3, Sinfonia dolorosa (1975)
Kungliga filharmonikerna, Stockholm,Peter Maag.
Source LP: Artemis ART 50-104.  LP cover reproduced below.

From Youtube (posted by Robt0007)

Duell: Duet for percussion and Accordion
Van Burka-percussion, Dragan Mirkovic-accordion (Gallery of Matica srpska, Novi Sad-Serbia, February the 7th, 2007.)
Posted on Youtube  by Dragan Mirkovic

Bewegun: For Accordian and String Quartet
Peformed by the Fandango Band
Maxim Fedorov, bayan (Accordian)
Ivan Subbotkin violine
Simeon Denisov, violine
Artem Valentinov, viola
Vasily Ratkin, cello

Posted on Youtube by Simon Denisov







Blurb from eClassical.com:

Swedish composer Torbjörn Iwan Lundquist (1920-2000). Lundquist represents to a far greater extent than his predecessors Cowell and Cage the traditional view of percussive instruments as a source of sound expressive of power, hardness and incisiveness. He blended the great European orchestral tradition with neomodernism and jazz.Conductor and artistic director at the Drottningholm Caste Theatre between 1949 and 1956. Hugo Alfvén Prize 1992.

Bio from AccordeonWorld:
Lundquist Torbjörn Iwan (1920 - 2000)

Torbjörn Lundquist was born in Stockholm on 30th of September 1920. He was a Swedish composer, conductor and musicologist.

After military service in 1945, he studied musicology at the University of Uppsala, with Issai Dobrowen, and composition with Dag Wirén. In Salzburg and Vienna he studied conducting with Otmar Suitner.

In 1947 he founded his own chamber orchestra, which he also conducted. From 1949 till 1956 he was conductor with the orchestra of the Royal Theatre Drotteningholm. Since that time he was guest conductor with orchestras in Sweden and throughout Europe.
From 1963 till 1971 Lundquist was member of the administrationof the Swedish Federation of Composers. From 1969 till 1971 he was their second practitioner.

In 1956 his symphony no 1 was premiered, but it was followed by a period of experimentation and studies in different styles, genres and traditions. From 1970 Lundquist decided to stop composing symphonical works. Only the financial support of the Swedish government allowed him to restart composing symphonical music.
His Symphony no 3, Sinfonie Dolorosa, was a pioneering work. His relationship with nature is shown in Symphony no 4, Sinfonia Ecologica and also in Symphony no 6, Sarek.

Lundquist used different forms of expression and style in order to reach the synthesis he was looking for: traditional music, modern avant-garde and jazz elements are confrontated with each other. The various elements merge together into a personal and rich palette, that the composer refined to a strong expression over the years.

The works of Torbjörn Lundquist reflect a strong acceptance of life and love for freedom, with feelings that range from thoughtful sincerity to great eruptions. Lundquist lived close to nature, but also close to what happened in the outside world. He was looking for the key of living, not to escape reality, but for being able to recover.

In 1989 he was rewarded the Atterberg Prize for his engaged musical works. In 1992 he got the Hugo Alfvenprize.

From the Swedish Music Information Center:

Torbjörn Iwan Lundquist
Born in Stockholm on the 30th September, 1920, died in Grillby on the 1st July 2000. After school and military service he went to Uppsala University in 1945 to study musicology. At the same time he studied composition with Dag Wirén and, during the 70s, conducting with Otmar Suitner in Salzburg and Vienna. In 1947 Lundquist founded a chamber orchestra of his own, which led to his appointment as conductor and artistic director of the Drottningholm Court Theatre from 1949 to 1956. He also appeared as guest conductor with symphony orchestras in Sweden and Europe.

The years as a symphonist, from the first symphony in 1956 and particularly since 1970, have not excluded works in other genres: songs, music for percussion, concertos, chamber music, choral works and two operas. Symphony No. 3, “Sinfonia Dolorosa“, was Lundquist’s breakthrough as a symphonist. He often emphasised the importance of nature and its imprint is noticeable in Symphony No. 4, “Sinfonia Ecologica“ and Symphony No. 6, “Sarek“. His strong commitment to universal issues is also evident in Symphony No. 2 “... for freedom“, Symphony No. 7, “Humanity“, dedicated to the memory of Dag Hammarskjöld, and Symphony No. 9, “Survival“. The subtitles of the symphonies – which should not be interpreted programmatically but only as an indication of a basic idea or source of inspiration – give us a hint of Lundquist’s manifestations of will.

Lundquist made use of many different expressive and stylistic means in his compositional technique in order to achieve the synthesis he was aiming for, which juxtaposes traditionally constructed music, modern avant-garde elements and jazz-influenced outbreaks. Although the composer himself emphasised influences from other cultures – the Indonesian gamelan orchestras with their distinctive percussion sounds, for example, and the Saami vuolle (often wrongly called “yoik“) – his symphonies are essentially a part of the European orchestral tradition. The different elements blend together to form a personal, rich palette which the composer refined over the years to suit his strong need to express himself. His works reflect a profound obsession with life and a passionate desire for freedom. He expresses emotions that range from meditative serenity to violent eruptions in a musical language that is basically tonal.

He lived close to nature, but was also keenly aware of the world around him. In times of rapid change and environmental pollution, Torbjörn Iwan Lundquist was trying to find life’s innermost core, “not to flee from reality, but to restore it". In 1989 he was awarded STIM’s (Swedish Performing Rights Society) Atterberg Prize and the motive of the jury mentioned his “absorbing and unpretentious musical art with its profound humanistic spirit.“ He was awarded the Hugo Alfvén Prize in 1992 for his "rich compositional achievements founded on idealism and naturalistic lyricism”.
Tony Lundman (rev. 2001)
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All download links I have posted are for works, that, to  my knowledge, have never been commercially released in digital form.  Should you find I've been in error, please notify myself or an Administrator.  Please IM me if I've made any errors that require attention, as I may not read replies.

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