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Estonian Music


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Author Topic: Estonian Music  (Read 7293 times)
Caostotale
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« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2012, 06:17:09 am »

I've yet to listen to the symphonic works, but I'm really impressed with the slew of Eller piano works I've been exposed to in recent years. Toccata Classics is in the process of putting out the first complete edition of those works, a project that will require seven volumes. I've also heard some extremely old recordings of a few of his string quartets, and those are nice pieces as well.

I would argue that, alongside his fellow Baltic composer Vytautas Bacevicius (from Lithuania), Eller is amongst the most fruitful composers worth investigating in that region, not least because it's important to see that there were actually great composers writing great music before the onslaught of holy minimalism redefined the world's understanding of Baltic music. I can't help but feel something shallow in people's eager willingness to act culturally paternal and gush over all that new age music by Vasks, Part, Gorecki, as if it's a musical balm that's washing away the horrors of communism and reintroducing a proper spiritualism to the lives of those poor second-worlders...or maybe I'm just being a jerk  Huh  A good start might be a de-emphasizing of Eller's occupation as 'the guy who taught Part.'
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kyjo
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« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2013, 04:35:08 am »

Thanks again Colin, for the Tamberg Symphony no. 3 Smiley Smiley

This fine composer should be getting more attention than Part IMO Smiley

...or, at least as much attention Grin
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2013, 04:39:44 am »

I have just posted Eino Tamberg's Symphony No.3 of 1989 in the Downloads section.

Tamberg's Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2 are on a (probably hard to find) Antes disc but, as far as I know, the 3rd and 4th have not been commercially recorded. Tamberg is one of the more "modern" sounding Estonian composers of the late 20th century and certainly quite different from his contemporary Arvo Part or even Lepo Sumera of the younger generation. His music is-I suppose one might say-"expressionist" and I am not entirely comfortable with it. On the other hand I recognise the composer as an important figure in the evolution of Estonian music, not afraid to be slightly experimental in his use of orchestral sonorities.
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« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2013, 04:59:09 am »

If you find the first half of the Tamberg too "difficult" please persist; the last five minutes or so are quite moving in an idiom which is very reminiscent of late Shostakovich.
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kyjo
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« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2013, 06:08:25 am »

Thanks for the warning, Colin! I'll still give it a listen, though.

...that reminds me of the Braga Santos Symphony no. 6 where the last five minutes or so are hauntingly moving and by far my favorite part of the piece; the rest is disappointingly modernistic in style when compared to his gloriously late-romantic other symphonies. Speaking of Braga Santos, I think the greatest musical discovery I have made, not of any year, but of my life is his Symphony no. 4 Smiley


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Dundonnell
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« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2013, 03:19:00 pm »

I am not sure that I would go that far regarding the Braga Santos 4th.....but the year in which I discovered the Portugese composer's music would certainly be a highlight Smiley

One cannot listen to that composer's early music without being bowled over by the sheer panache, elan and, above all, life-enhancing optimism and magnificent sweep of the music. It always leaves me feeling envigorated and renewed Smiley
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kyjo
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« Reply #21 on: January 01, 2013, 05:10:05 pm »

I am not sure that I would go that far regarding the Braga Santos 4th.....but the year in which I discovered the Portugese composer's music would certainly be a highlight Smiley

One cannot listen to that composer's early music without being bowled over by the sheer panache, elan and, above all, life-enhancing optimism and magnificent sweep of the music. It always leaves me feeling envigorated and renewed Smiley

Colin, by greatest "discovery" I meant coming across an obscure piece for the first time (I should have made that more clear Roll Eyes). I am not counting hearing masterpieces by the great composers for the first time as a "discovery". No...Braga Santos' 4th is not my all-time favorite piece of music, but it is probably my favorite lesser-known work that I have discovered. I agree with your description of his music-it just makes you so full of life Smiley Now back to Estonian music-this thread has had the tendency to go wildly off-topic Grin
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rkhenderson
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« Reply #22 on: January 01, 2013, 06:57:18 pm »

If you find the first half of the Tamberg too "difficult" please persist; the last five minutes or so are quite moving in an idiom which is very reminiscent of late Shostakovich.
Tamberg started composing in a vein very close to Shostakovich. His early works such as Concerto Grosso, Symphonic Dances and Ballet Symphony are very enjoyable. The progression to his later works is interesting to follow. I can recommend his Symphony No. 1 and Violin Concerto.

Some of his works are available for download from http://muusika24.ee/&lang=eng
His Symphony No. 4 is available on a CD enclosed within his autobiography "Tundeline Teekond".

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kyjo
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« Reply #23 on: January 01, 2013, 07:09:43 pm »

Thanks for the information Smiley

I do enjoy his earlier music quite a bit-like you say, Shostakovich (one of my favorite composers) is a prime influence. His later music, though, is at the extreme outer edge of my sensibilities.
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jowcol
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« Reply #24 on: February 05, 2013, 04:31:06 pm »

Taavo Virkhaus  Symphony 1

Baltimore Symphony orchestra
Merriweather Post Pavillion
Composer, Conductor
8 July, 1976 
World Premiere
Radio Broadcast

Movements
Aggresivo
Valse triste
Variazione testardo (sp?)

From the collection of Karl Miller


A couple of notes.

First-- I was not at this concert, but I can proudly boast that I was almost beaten up at this venue 13 years later, but fortunately I could run faster then than I can now.

Second:  Although he was living in the US, his bio makes him sound like an Estonian at heart, which is why I'm listing him here.

Wiki Bio:

Taavo Virkhaus was born on 29.06.1934. He studied in Elementary School of Tartu Seminary for one and a half years. In 1944, he fled to Germany. There he continued his studies in Estonian Elementary School in Gesilingen and after that in Estonian Gymnasium in Geislingen. 1949 emigrated to USA. 1951-1955 he studied in University of Miami (field of study was music). 1957 graduated the University of Rochester Eastman Music School with MA of music theory, 1967 graduated same school with PhD. 1956 he made his debut in conducting with the Miami Ballet Guild orchestra. Since that he has been conducting several orchestras in USA, Canada, Europe and Russia. 1978 he got the first opportunity to conduct in Estonia (Estonian National Symphony Orchestra). T.Virkhaus has presented a number of Estonian composer’s works in America. T.Virhaus has worked in Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra as conductor; University of Rochester. Eastman School of Music as assistant, professor, associate professor and director of music; West Miami Junior High School as music teacher (1955-1956); Duluth Superior Symphony Orchestra as conductor and music director (1977-1994); Huntsville Symphony Orchestra as conductor (1989-2003). Social activities: The Eduard Tubin Society (member); Estonian American National Council (council member); corp. Fraternitas Estica (member); Estonian Mixed Choir in Buffalo (conductor, 1957-1961). Tartu City Government recognized him with the medal to honor his activities for carrying on Estonian music life abroad and for participating in Estonian and Tartu Song Festivals.



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All download links I have posted are for works, that, to  my knowledge, have never been commercially released in digital form.  Should you find I've been in error, please notify myself or an Administrator.  Please IM me if I've made any errors that require attention, as I may not read replies.
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« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2013, 02:05:14 am »

The Eller symphonies started with great orchestration and great promise, but the subsequent themes appeared to be fabricated and the music
meandering in search of consistency. While I kept thinking, darn..this is music I should like(I like Tubin a great deal) ...it did not raise much above see level for me. Much of Eller's music has the same effect on me and I have spent hours with it..it never seems to rise above blase for me.
On the other hand:
For one to say Von Koch's music is less than top shelf may 1)not of heard the right pieces or 2)been exposed to defective audio and/or performances or 3)is expecting profound messages where none should be expected. I suggest a relisten on that basis.
I recently heard the recent broadcast of his 2nd symphony on Swedish radio and was completely entralled with the piece. Nothing profound, no messages for mankind, just infectious melodious music accessable to nearly everyone.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #26 on: March 25, 2013, 02:08:15 am »

Thanks for the warning, Colin! I'll still give it a listen, though.

...that reminds me of the Braga Santos Symphony no. 6 where the last five minutes or so are hauntingly moving and by far my favorite part of the piece; the rest is disappointingly modernistic in style when compared to his gloriously late-romantic other symphonies. Speaking of Braga Santos, I think the greatest musical discovery I have made, not of any year, but of my life is his Symphony no. 4 Smiley




I absolutely agree with the Braga Santos 4th!!
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dhibbard
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« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2013, 06:20:22 pm »

After a little break, I'll start downloading my Estonian Music collection...I have a rich collection, including the collection from Radio Estonia.
Dave
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ttle
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« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2013, 09:42:31 pm »


Villem Reimann passed away in 1992.
Many thanks for the upload!
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2013, 12:55:23 am »

After a little break, I'll start downloading my Estonian Music collection...I have a rich collection, including the collection from Radio Estonia.
Dave

Please do, some obscure works by Mägi,Raid,Tobias,Tamberg,Raats and Tubin would be good..
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