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SOME unrecorded British Piano Concertos, 1934-94


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Author Topic: SOME unrecorded British Piano Concertos, 1934-94  (Read 864 times)
Holger
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« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2019, 06:58:14 am »

There already is an excellent recording of the Reizenstein PC 2 available on Dutton Epoch, released in 2011, with Victor Sangiorgio (piano) and Martin Yates conducting the RSNO. It is coupled with the PC 2 of Stanley Bates.

On the other hand, this recording is already out of print (though only released in 2011!), which is a problem with many Dutton releases these discs are no longer available far too early. Of course, there is the possibility of getting the CD as a download via Amazon, qobuz or so, but I actually want the original CD, and at present it seems it is almost impossible to get hold of a copy (at least for a reasonable price). In this sense, the new CPO disc will be welcome.
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M. Yaskovsky
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« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2019, 11:24:32 am »

Here's one for a resonable price https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/STANLEY-BATE-FRANK-REIZENSTEIN-PIANO-CONCERTOS-NO-2-DUTTON-CDLX-7282-/123745590614
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Holger
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« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2019, 05:51:02 pm »

Thanks for the hint! Unfortunately, it seems the seller only ships to GB (actually, when I search for the CD via Ebay Germany this offer is not even displayed).
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Grandenorm
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« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2019, 08:30:58 pm »

How very tiresome of him! Would you like me to buy it on your behalf and post it on to you in Germany, if you give me your address? You can pay me later by bank transfer if you wish.
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Holger
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« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2019, 09:05:28 pm »

Many thanks for your offer much appreciated! However, Colin / Dundonnell has meanwhile offered his help in buying the CD, so all is fine. Anyway, great to have fellow collectors around who are willing to help! Smiley
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Grandenorm
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« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2019, 09:15:29 pm »

You are very welcome. Glad Colin can assist.
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relm1
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« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2019, 01:12:12 am »

As far as I am aware-and I may of course be wrong- Bourgeois did not actually write a Piano Concerto.

This is Derek's 32 minute piano concerto in three movements. 

Movement 1: https://www.scoreexchange.com/scores/108900.html
Movement 2: https://www.scoreexchange.com/scores/109004.html
Movement 3: https://www.scoreexchange.com/scores/109350.html

Score, parts, and audio mock up at the link.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2019, 02:10:32 pm »

Thank you for this.

As I understand it the Piano Concerto is part of the Symphony No.65 which is intended to play as a concert-with an Overture, Concerto and Symphony. Did Bourgeois want all three components to be played in sequence or sanction the individual elements to be performed quite independently? I suspect we do not know.

But whatever is the case I am happy to acknowledge that there is a Piano Concerto (albeit within a symphonic context).
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2019, 02:12:57 pm »

It is interesting to note from recent posts that despite Amphissa's reservations there are a number of concertos by composers I orginally named which do seem to interest at least some members on here........although not perhaps enough to initiate a commercial bandwagon Grin
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2019, 02:21:49 pm »

Many thanks for your offer much appreciated! However, Colin / Dundonnell has meanwhile offered his help in buying the CD, so all is fine. Anyway, great to have fellow collectors around who are willing to help! Smiley

I have ordered the cd from the ebay seller. Always happy to reciprocate Smiley
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relm1
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« Reply #25 on: June 17, 2019, 03:37:43 pm »

Thank you for this.

As I understand it the Piano Concerto is part of the Symphony No.65 which is intended to play as a concert-with an Overture, Concerto and Symphony. Did Bourgeois want all three components to be played in sequence or sanction the individual elements to be performed quite independently? I suspect we do not know.

But whatever is the case I am happy to acknowledge that there is a Piano Concerto (albeit within a symphonic context).
The idea was an ill advised concert program where an opening overture, subsequent piano concerto, then symphony would be the entire symphony.  But the works can be performed separately.  Sort of like how Kalevi Aho in his Symphony No. 17 says these can be played as individual tone poems or as a collective symphony. 
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #26 on: June 17, 2019, 04:54:31 pm »

The problem with the concept is that while Aho is probably Finland's most prominent living composer and certainly the most recorded Bourgeois had been virtually ignored since his first half dozen or so symphonies. The idea of a whole concert of hia music was perhaps a bit unrealistic.

......but clearly neglect did not deter Bourgeois- which was entirely admirable of course.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #27 on: June 17, 2019, 09:21:43 pm »

.....and I am aware that Aulis Sallinen is still alive and might well have claims on the status of pre-eminence!
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relm1
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« Reply #28 on: June 18, 2019, 01:14:23 am »

The problem with the concept is that while Aho is probably Finland's most prominent living composer and certainly the most recorded Bourgeois had been virtually ignored since his first half dozen or so symphonies. The idea of a whole concert of hia music was perhaps a bit unrealistic.

......but clearly neglect did not deter Bourgeois- which was entirely admirable of course.

I don't think Public Relations skills should be a requirement for a composer's music being worthy of being easily available (or it shouldn't be).  Bourgeois' day will come like Havergal Brian, Rued Langgaard, and others whose verbose talent patiently lied in wait.  I do wonder if Derek would be more popular had he died in 2003 when he had 15 epic symphonies?  Should Mahler be less regarded given his 10 symphonies if he lived another 10 years and wrote 5 more symphonies?  What if Shostakovich wrote 25 symphonies because he lived another decade? Would Wagner be more valid if he died after Das Rheingold?  Yes, yes, I know this is an exercise in futility but ultimately there is one conclusion.  We are left to judge them with what they have left behind.  The fact that Derek went on to write a million more symphonies should not be held against him.  He merely gave up on the system and wrote without regard to securing a performance.  I don't know if this is the case with composers in England, but in America, did you know that nearly all composers spend most of their time NOT composing but with various business activities?  I was surprised to learn that a successful composer I know spends maybe two to three hours a day on creative efforts.  The huge bulk of time is various promotion.  What output would a composer create if they no longer cared about that other 75% of their day?  Mahler basically composed in the summer.  What if he created all year long, what gems might we today enjoy?  An opera of his?  A Violin Concerto?  His completed Symphony No. 10, maybe 11?  Virtually no contemporary composer can afford this scenario but a few can.  Derek did and he shouldn't be dismissed because of that.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #29 on: June 18, 2019, 02:42:48 pm »

I too hope that Bourgeois's day will come. You mention Havergal Brian and Rued Langgaard. As far as Brian is concerned the rediscovery of his music began towards the end of his very long life and was inspired by the promotion of the music by his passionate advocate the composer Robert Simpson. Simpson was, at that time, a BBC Music Producer and used that position to get Brian's symphonies performed and broadcast. Since then the dedicated support and financial power of the Havergal Brian Society has enormously facilitated the recording of the music.

What is required to revive a neglected composer's music is a combination of factors. It helps if the music is broacast. In the UK that means that the BBC has to demonstrate an interest. BBC music producers have to be aware of the composer's existence and willing to push for broadcast performances. There have to be conductors willing to learn the music. This is less likely nowadays when there are fewer British conductors regularly conducting regional orchestras.

Record companies are also crucial. The reality again nowadays is that companies like to record a series of a composer's music. This is where the sheer number of Bourgeois's symphonies works to his disadvantage. Had he composed a dozen or so then he would have more appeal to a label which might show some interest.

It is, sadly, not necessarily a reflection on the quality of the music but is more to do with the interest/support of those who have the required influence. This is the difficulty Bourgeois faces.

Harsh reality......but never give up!
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