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Russian Composer Chernov, Mikhail, Mikhaĭlovich (1879 - 1938)


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Author Topic: Russian Composer Chernov, Mikhail, Mikhaĭlovich (1879 - 1938)  (Read 126 times)
dhibbard
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« on: May 11, 2019, 06:19:43 am »

https://urresearch.rochester.edu/institutionalPublicationPublicView.action?institutionalItemId=34531&versionNumber=1

Recently, saw where Sibley Library published this composers piano work from 1900 published by Jurgenson in Moscow  " Les Fleurs 12 morceaux pour piano. "

I am not familiar with this composer also spelled as M Tschernow or Tschernov  or just Chernov.


 
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2019, 09:10:12 pm »

His biography is available in Russian on the Russian 'side' of Wikipedia

https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Чернов,_Михаил_Михайлович

If anyone badly needs it, I can knock out a quick English tranlation of that page. In essence, his biography was study at the Physics & Maths faculty of SPbniv until 1903.  Subseqently studied composition and orchestration at the SPb Conservatoire with RImsky-Korsakov and Lyadov.  From 1910 until his death in 1938 he himself taught the same two topics at the SPb Conservatoire (where his pupils included Mravinsky).

His output appears to have covered a number of gences, including 3 symphonies, piano music, and a number of comic operas and operettas, along with incidental music for theatre productions. He also composed the music for the Anthem of the Young Communists (Komsomol) in 1928.
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« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2019, 11:04:57 pm »

thank you !!!    I don't in the documentation that any of his symphonic works were ever recorded...  esp. his 3 symphonies.    Another lost and unrecorded student of Rimsky.
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2019, 01:05:19 am »

There is no information about his symphonies being recorded on that page. for sure.  But the Russian version of Wikipedia is even less reliable than its English-language counterpart, so there could still be an outside chance that recordings exist, somewhere?   

Personally I am more intrigued by the idea of early-20th Russian operettas....  but sadly Wikipedia doesn't even give their titles, let alone any deeper detail Sad   I wonder if they were ever performed, and if so, where and when?  One imagines SPb  (since he was living and working there), but perhaps in other cities in the Russian Empire or the USSR?   He certainly made an adept leap from posh societiy musical comedies to writing the Komsomol Anthem... so he knew which side his bread was buttered Wink  But who can blame him?
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dhibbard
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« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2019, 04:57:07 am »

There is no information about his symphonies being recorded on that page. for sure.  But the Russian version of Wikipedia is even less reliable than its English-language counterpart, so there could still be an outside chance that recordings exist, somewhere?   

Personally I am more intrigued by the idea of early-20th Russian operettas....  but sadly Wikipedia doesn't even give their titles, let alone any deeper detail Sad   I wonder if they were ever performed, and if so, where and when?  One imagines SPb  (since he was living and working there), but perhaps in other cities in the Russian Empire or the USSR?   He certainly made an adept leap from posh societiy musical comedies to writing the Komsomol Anthem... so he knew which side his bread was buttered Wink  But who can blame him?

I am looking in the Ho/Feofanov Dictionary of Soviet Composers and they state his pupils include Gauk, Kamensky, Kreek, Ovchinnikov, and Prokofiev.   His 3 symphonies were written 1907, 1924 and 1928.   No references to any Melodiya recordings.
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dhibbard
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2019, 08:30:01 pm »

There is no information about his symphonies being recorded on that page. for sure.  But the Russian version of Wikipedia is even less reliable than its English-language counterpart, so there could still be an outside chance that recordings exist, somewhere?   

Personally I am more intrigued by the idea of early-20th Russian operettas....  but sadly Wikipedia doesn't even give their titles, let alone any deeper detail Sad   I wonder if they were ever performed, and if so, where and when?  One imagines SPb  (since he was living and working there), but perhaps in other cities in the Russian Empire or the USSR?   He certainly made an adept leap from posh societiy musical comedies to writing the Komsomol Anthem... so he knew which side his bread was buttered Wink  But who can blame him?

I am looking in the Ho/Feofanov Dictionary of Soviet Composers and they state his pupils include Gauk, Kamensky, Kreek, Ovchinnikov, and Prokofiev.   His 3 symphonies were written 1907, 1924 and 1928.   No references to any Melodiya recordings.

I did find that his symphonies were published by Jurgenson in Moscow and Leipzig..... chances are they may have been performed somewhere but known recordings are not found.
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Holger
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« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2019, 09:27:07 pm »

I heard about this composer for the first time quite a couple of years ago when I got a symphony which was supposed to be his First. However, it quickly came out that this was a misattribution and what I had got was in fact the First Symphony by Gennady Chernov (* 1937). By then, I did some research on whether any music by Mikhail Chernov was available but nothing could be found, and the situation does not seem to have changed. His Third Symphony seems to have have been written for the 1928 Schubert competition which was finally won by Atterberg. Anyhow, getting something by him might be nice, though personally I neither think it is very likely nor do I really expect a major discovery.

By the way, the Ovchinnikov whom Chernov taught is not the famous Vyacheslav who died earlier this year (and who was only two years old when Chernov died) but some Evgeny who is pretty much forgotten today.
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« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2019, 11:46:16 pm »

I would bet that one of the symphonies was released on a 78 album
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dhibbard
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« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2019, 12:28:08 am »

There is no information about his symphonies being recorded on that page. for sure.  But the Russian version of Wikipedia is even less reliable than its English-language counterpart, so there could still be an outside chance that recordings exist, somewhere?   

Personally I am more intrigued by the idea of early-20th Russian operettas....  but sadly Wikipedia doesn't even give their titles, let alone any deeper detail Sad   I wonder if they were ever performed, and if so, where and when?  One imagines SPb  (since he was living and working there), but perhaps in other cities in the Russian Empire or the USSR?   He certainly made an adept leap from posh societiy musical comedies to writing the Komsomol Anthem... so he knew which side his bread was buttered Wink  But who can blame him?

I am looking in the Ho/Feofanov Dictionary of Soviet Composers and they state his pupils include Gauk, Kamensky, Kreek, Ovchinnikov, and Prokofiev.   His 3 symphonies were written 1907, 1924 and 1928.   No references to any Melodiya recordings.

I did find that his symphonies were published by Jurgenson in Moscow and Leipzig..... chances are they may have been performed somewhere but known recordings are not found.

Can someone access the National Library of Russia to see if his symphonies are located there?   I don't see anything in the worldcat.
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