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German Music


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Author Topic: German Music  (Read 4810 times)
jowcol
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« on: September 04, 2012, 04:54:11 pm »

Kurt Hessenberg: Piano Concerto, Op. 21


Friedrich Wilhelm Schmorr, Piano
Philharmonia Hungarica, Cond Siegfried Krüller

Radio broadcast, Date Unknown

From the collection of Karl Miller


Wikipedia Bio:

Kurt Hessenberg (August 17, 1908 – June 17, 1994) was a German composer and professor at the Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst in Frankfurt am Main.

Life
Kurt Hessenberg was born on August 17, 1908 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, as the fourth and last child of the lawyer Eduard Hessenberg and his wife Emma, née Kugler. Among his ancestors was Heinrich Hoffmann, whose famous children's book Struwwelpeter Hessenberg was to arrange for children's choir (op. 49) later in his life. From 1927–1931 Hessenberg studied at the Leipzig Conservatory. Among his teachers were Günter Raphael (composition) and Robert Teichmüller (piano). In 1933 Hessenberg became a teacher at the Hoch'sche Konservatorium in Frankfurt am Main, where he himself had taken his earliest music lessons. In 1940 Hessenberg received the "Nationaler Kompositionspreis" (national prize for composition), joined the NSDAP in 1942[1], and in 1951 he was awarded the Robert-Schumann-Prize of the city of Düsseldorf for his cantata "Vom Wesen und Vergehen" op. 45. Hessenberg was appointed professor of composition at the Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst in 1953 and taught there until his retirement in 1973. Kurt Hessenberg died in Frankfurt am Main on June 17, 1994.[2]

Hessenberg's work contributed significantly to the repertoire of the Protestant churches in the 20th century. Among his most noted students were Hans Zender and Peter Cahn.



Bio from Cassandra Records


Kurt Hessenberg (1908-1994)
(b Frankfurt, Aug. 17, 1908; d Frankfurt, June 17, 1994). German composer. He studied in Leipzig (1927-31) with Günther Raphael (composition) and Robert Teichmüller (piano), and in 1933 he was appointed to teach at the Hoch Conservatory (later known as the ‘Musikhochschule’) in Frankfurt. He remained there throughout his career, and was made professor in 1953. All major genres have been represented in his oeuvre of 135 opus numbers consisting of 4 symphonies, numerous other orchestral and concerto works, an abundant variety of chamber music, a body of organ compositions, a wealth of choral and vocal works, and an opera. Possessing great facility in composition, Hessenberg evolved an effective idiom that draws from a rich musical heritage but is in no way confined by it. He combines a fluent contrapuntal skill (developed from his love of Baroque music) with a quite individual tonal harmonic style. His slow movements have a delicately woven poetry, together with – in his music for voices – a very smooth melodic line. Among the many awards made to him were the National Composition Prize (1940), the Robert Schumann Prize given by the city of Düsseldorf (1951), 2 Goethe Plaques, one given by the city of Frankfurt (1973) and the other by the government of Hesse (1979), and the Order of Merit first-class of the German Federal Republic (1989).







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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2012, 05:11:32 pm »

Music of Heinrich Kaminski


1 Intro
2. Dorishche Musik (1933)


Bamberg Symphony Orchestra
Jan Koetsier, Conductor

3. Intro
4. Concerto Grosso
5. Outro


Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra
Othmar Maga, conductor

Radio Broadcasts, Dates Unknown

From the collection of Karl Miller


Essay about Dorian Music from Classical Iconoclast

Who was Heinrich Kaminski (1886-1946)? Admired by Arnold Schoenberg and a leading figure in German music circles, he's largely forgotten today, though there are signs of a major revival. Listen to Kaminski's Dorische-musik (Dorian Music) on the Berliner Philharmoniker website. Star conductor Andris Nelsons conducts the Berliner Philharmoniker, soloists Amihai Grosz,  Ludwig Quandt and Andreas Buschatz.

It's a gloriously affirmative work, passionately reasserting the ideals of Bach and Beethoven. "Music", Kaminski said, should motivate people to "trace the roots of life and the meaning of human existence". He saw his duty as "bearing witness to the light".

Kaminski's Dorian music starts without hesitation and goes straight into full development, buoyed up by confident purpose. This isn't abstract music for its own sake. Beethovenian forward thrust, direct quotes from Bach. To quote the Berliner Philharmoniker notes "from polyphonic concentration....Kaminski creates free flowing spatial music characterized by extreme tempo and rhythmic shifts....It is a genuinely forward-looking work, gripping in its unique mix of eruptive energy and mystical immersion".
 
It's amazingly uplifting, and spiritually powerful. Yet, note, it was written and first performed in 1934, by Herrmann Scherchen in Switzerland. What, one might think was there to be so confident about? Kaminski's response was, on July 4, 1933, to create an “order of those that love”. The rules of this order demanded that its members “hate no one and nothing, and must not be seduced into hate by evil willfulness or abusive actions. Hate is to be overcome by No-Hate”. Advocates of non-violence, like Gandhi, and Aung San Suu Kyi  think that breaking cycles of hate might just work, though Kaminski's faith in the context of the horrors that were to come might seem naive.

Kaminski was involved with the liberal Munich avant garde, from which his ideals may have sprung, but he was also part of the "inner resistance" of K A Hartmann and others. Perhaps, too, Kaminksi's principles may have come from his father. Kaminski senior had been a Catholic priest, who'd quit the priesthood on principle after the First Vatican Council in 1869/70 (the one that introduced papal infallibility). So in a sense, we owe Kaminski's birth to his father's opposition to the Pope. But the Kaminski family were originally Jewish, from Poland. This status seemed to have confounded the Nazis. He lost his job in Berlin in 1933, apparently for political reasons, but his music wasn't banned until 1938. Then the ban was lifted in 1941 because they thought he was a quarter Jew not a half-Jew. Racial stereotypes aren't rational. Life wasn't kind to Kaminski. He lost most of his family during the war and died himself soon after. But when I listen to his Dorian Music, it's vital, humanistic spirit seems unextinguishable. The piece isn't available on CD, though there are clips on Universal Editions. All the more reason to cherish the Berliner-Philharmoniker performance, which is perhaps as good as it gets.
Posted by Doundou Tchil



Wikipedia Bio

Heinrich Kaminski (4 July 1886 - 21 June 1946) was a German composer.

Life
Kaminski was born in Tiengen in the Schwarzwald, the son of an Old Catholic priest of Jewish parentage. After a short period working in a bank in Offenbach, he moved to Heidelberg, originally to study politics. However, a chance meeting with Martha Warburg changed his mind: she recognised his musical gift and became his patroness. In 1909 he went to Berlin and began studying music at the Stern Conservatoire, piano with Severin Eisenberger.

In 1914 he began work as a piano teacher in Benediktbeuern. His friends and contemporaries at this time included the painter Emil Nolde and also Franz Marc, whose wife was among his piano students.

During World War I Kaminski was also active as a choirmaster and teacher of composition. Later he received a professorship at the Prussian Academy of Arts in Berlin, where he became director of a master class in composition (thus treading in the footsteps of Hans Pfitzner). His most significant pupils were Carl Orff, Heinz Schubert und Reinhard Schwarz-Schilling.

His contract was terminated in 1933 with no renewal on the grounds of his "political opinions" and he returned to Benediktbeuern. Various attempts to re-establish his career came to nothing for the same reason. A check of his ancestry - he had been categorised in 1938 as a "half-Jew", and in 1941 declared a "quarter-Jew" - led to an ongoing ban on the performance of his works. He found himself obliged to flee, to France and Switzerland among other places.

Between 1939 and 1945 he lost three children, and died himself in 1946 at Ried, Bavaria.





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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2012, 05:26:27 pm »

Hermann Schroeder Piano Concerto


Tiny Wirtz, Piano
Köln Radio Symphony Orchestra
Wilhelm Schrichter, conductor

From the collection of Karl Miller

Radio Broadcast, Date Unknown


Wikipedia Bio

Hermann Schroeder (26 March 1904 in Bernkastel – 7 October 1984 in Bad Orb) was a German composer and a Catholic church musician.

He spent the greatest part of his life’s work in the Rheinland. His main sphere of activity as composer, conductor and organist were in addition to his work as Professor of choral conducting, counterpoint and composition at the Hochschule für Musik Köln and conducting various semiprofessional ensembles such as the Bach-Verein Köln and the Rheinischer Kammerchor.

Schroeder's works are characterized by the employment of elements of Gregorian chant, harmonized with quintal and quartal harmonies.

The following quotation describes his creative principle most clearly: "connection to the church-mode melos in the chromatic realm while simultaneously retaining the relativity of the intervallic values."[verification needed]

Important works: Missa Gregoriana, Missa dorica, Hermann und Leander (opera), organ music, folk-song settings, German settings of the Ordinary and Proper of the Mass.




Bio from Schott Music



Hermann Schroeder, born on 26 March 1904 in Bernkastel-Kues (Mosel), died on 7 October 1984 in Bad Orb, studied at the Cologne Musikhochschule (1926-30) with Heinrich Lemacher and Walter Braunfels (composition), Hans Bachem (organ), Hermann Abendroth (conducting) and Dominicus Johner (Gregorian chant). He was music teacher in Cologne (1930-38) and cathedral organist in Trier (1938/39).

From 1946-1981 he taught music theory at the Cologne Musikhochschule and was director of Cologne’s Bach Society (1947-1962). With H. Lemacher, Schroeder has published several textbooks on harmony, counterpoint and musical form, which have gained wide currency in German-speaking countries. In 1952 he was awarded the Robert Schumann Prize of the city of Düsseldorf, in 1955 the first prize in the organ competition at Haarlem/the Netherlands, in 1956 he received the Arts Prize from the state of Rheinland-Pfalz (1956) and in 1974 he was appointed honorary doctor by the University of Bonn.

Schroeder is one of the most important German composers of the  20th century for organ. His music combines elements of the Middle Ages (fauxbourdon, ostinato technique, Gregorian modes), 20th-century polyphony and the linear, atonal writing of Hindemith. The chamber music for organ and other instruments constituted a special field of his musical activity.






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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2012, 07:58:26 pm »

Just to add that the Hessenberg Piano Concerto was written between 1939 and 1940 and revised in 1956.

Many thanks for this(and the other) uploads Smiley
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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2012, 08:23:42 pm »

Always a pleasure.  Do check out the Escudero-- it's gorgeous.
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« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2012, 12:57:59 am »

Music of Jurg Baur
REPOST FROM UC-- LOOK IN THE UC REPOSTS FOLDER


Pentagramm, Concerto for Wind Quartet (Radio Broadcast, Date Unknown)
Danzi Quintet, Cologne(?) Radio Symphony Orchestra
Zdenek Macal, conductor

Symphony 1
Duisburg Symphony Orchestra, Lawrence Foster, conductor (Date Unknown)

Duisburger Sinfonia (Patetcia)
Duisburg Symphony Orchestra, Lawrence Foster, conductor (1983)

MP3s, 192 kps
Not commercially released
From the collection of Karl Miller

Quote
We have some clarification on these tracks from Holger--

actually the First Symphony is the same work as the Duisburger Sinfonia, I guess it might even be the same performance maybe recorded by two different persons.

This is what is behind the confusion: Jürg Baur's First Symphony is called "Sinfonie einer Stadt (Patetica)", which means "Symphony of a City" in English. The city Baur means is Duisburg, if I remember correctly he composed in on commission for some jubilee. The piece is from 1983. As some members are interested in movement titles, here is what I know:

I. Invocation (Passacaglia)
II. Melancholie
III. Scherzo tumultoso
IV. [don't know]

Another  update, courtesy of Holger:

Quote
Checking the information I gathered for myself once again, there is another correction regarding the Jürg Baur upload. The orchestra playing in the "Pentagramm" Concerto is not the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra, but the Radio Filharmonisch Orkest (from the Netherlands). This can be heard if listening to the announcer carefully. To provide some more details, here are the members of the Danzi Quintet who play in this recording: Frans Vester (flute), Koen van Slogtere (oboe), Piet Honigh (clarinet), Brian Pollard (Bassoon) and Adriaan van Woudenberg (French Horn).


I’ve posted music of the German composer Jurg Baur in the downloads section,  Pentagramm, a Concerto for Wind Quartet,  his first symphony, and his Duisberger Sonfonia.    Below the portrait, I've got some highlights from the Wikipedia page for him below:


Wikipedia Bio

Jürg Baur (11 November 1918 – 31 January 2010) was a German composer of classical music.
•   
Education
Baur was born in Düsseldorf, where he achieved early recognition as a composer at the age of 18, when his First String Quartet was premiered at the Düsseldorf Hindenburg Secondary School by the then-famous Prisca Quartet. He studied from 1937 to 1948 (interrupted by army service from 1939–45, including several months as a Russian prisoner of war) at the Hochschule für Musik Köln: composition with Philipp Jarnach, piano with Karl Hermann Pillney, and organ and sacred music with Michael Schneider (Goslich 1982, 19 & 42; Levi 2001; Wallerang 2010). Even before completing his conservatory studies, he was appointed lecturer in music theory at the Düsseldorf Conservatory in 1946 (Levi 2001). He did postgraduate studies in musicology with Karl Gustav Fellerer and Willi Kahl from 1948 to 1951 at the University of Cologne (Goslich 1982, 19 & 42). In 1952 he was appointed choirmaster and organist at the St Paulus-Kirche in Düsseldorf, a post he left in 1960 when he was awarded a scholarship from the German Academy to study for six months at the Villa Massimo in Rome. He twice returned to Rome for extended visits, in 1968 and 1980 (Levi 2001).The vivid impression made by the Italian city is reflected in the Italian-titled works he composed there, including the Concerto romano for oboe and orchestra (Goslich 1982, 19 & 42).

Compositional career
Baur was one of the last composers of the old school. After the war, he remained faithful to his teacher Jarnach’s conservative stance, and never became an extreme avant-gardist (Wallerang 2010). Widespread recognition as a composer came comparatively late. Béla Bartók was his strongest stylistic influence at first, but in the 1950s he began to use twelve-tone technique. Anton Webern’s music became his model in works such as the Third String Quartet (1952), the Quintetto sereno for wind quintet (1958)—which also uses aleatory techniques—the Sonata for two pianos (1957), and the Ballata romana (1960) (Levi 2001). Later, he developed a marked propensity for quotations from earlier music. Particularly striking examples include Heinrich Isaac's "Innsbruck, ich muß dich lassen" in the Concerto da camera, a theme from Bach’s Musical Offering in the Ricercari for organ, as well as in the Kontrapunkte 77 for three woodwinds, and Schumann themes in Sentimento del tempo and, especially, in Musik mit Robert Schumann (Goslich 1982, 19 & 42). Other composers whose works Baur has quoted include Dvořák, Strauss, Gesualdo, Mozart and Schubert (Levi 2001).

Primarily a composer of orchestral and instrumental music, Baur also produced a number of works for less mainstream instruments such as the recorder and the accordion (Jacobs 1993; Levi 2001). He was one of the first composers to introduce the recorder to the new musical trends of the post-war era, with Incontri (1960), for recorder and piano, Mutazioni (1962) and Pezzi uccelli (1964), both for unaccompanied alto recorder, and the virtuosic Concerto da camera "Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit", for recorder and chamber orchestra of 1975 (Wallerang 2010).

In his 87th year, Baur completed his only opera, Der Roman mit dem Kontrabass, to a libretto by Michael Leinert after the story by Anton Chekhov. Commissioned on the occasion of the composer's 85th birthday in 2003 by the Deutsche Oper am Rhein, it was premiered at the Partika-Saal of the Robert Schumann Hochschule, Düsseldorf, on 25 November 2005, with Marco Vassilli and Kerstin Pohle singing the two main roles (Smychkov and the Countess Anastasia), Szymon Marciniak as the solo contrabassist, and Thomas Gabrisch conducting (Wallerang 2005).
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kyjo
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« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2012, 06:24:46 pm »

Many thanks to britishcomposer for recent batch of uploads of music by Jenner, Weweler, and Sekles Smiley! The latter two composers are new names to me, so these uploads are greatly appreciated Smiley.
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« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2012, 04:52:30 pm »

From my side also thanks for these German works. The the first and the last names I heard before. In Germany I had the pleasure to find a work of Jenner in the program. The name Weweler is new to me. 
Listening to the music I find again (and again, and...) that so many composers are lost in oblivion.
This may be right in some cases, but many times when a composer emerges,  I'm surprised with the music.
Why should we have to have 1200 or more series of Beethoven symphonies or those from  let say Mahler -splendid works! of course-, but I don't buy many double or more complete cycles, unless I'm very confident they are worth it. I rather buy cd's from un unknown composer in stead. Well I guess that's one of the reasons I'm (and many more of us?) a member here.


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« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2012, 05:12:52 pm »

From my side also thanks for these German works. The the first and the last names I heard before. In Germany I had the pleasure to find a work of Jenner in the program. The name Weweler is new to me. 
Listening to the music I find again (and again, and...) that so many composers are lost in oblivion.
This may be right in some cases, but many times when a composer emerges,  I'm surprised with the music.
Why should we have to have 1200 or more series of Beethoven symphonies or those from  let say Mahler -splendid works! of course-, but I don't buy many double or more complete cycles, unless I'm very confident they are worth it. I rather buy cd's from un unknown composer in stead. Well I guess that's one of the reasons I'm (and many more of us?) a member here.




Agree 100% Smiley Smiley
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kyjo
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« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2012, 08:05:13 pm »

May I second agreeing with everything in Elroel's post? Very well said Smiley Smiley.
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kyjo
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« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2012, 10:26:37 pm »

Thank you, britishcomposer, for the Emilie Mayer Symphony no. 4 Smiley Smiley! It's always good to hear from the women symphonists. Johanna Senfter anyone?
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shamus
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« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2012, 02:38:43 pm »

I greatly enjoyed the Mayer No. 4, had heard her No. 5, I think on a Dreyer-Gaido CD, probably deleted by now, and would love to hear her piano concerto and Faust overture, though I don't think that concert was recorded. In response to the mention of Johanna Senfter, I put her Sym no. 4 in German Downloads, and would certainly like to hear more of her orchestral music, too. Thanks to all. Jim
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kyjo
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« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2012, 08:43:33 pm »

Many, many thanks, shamus, for your re-upload of Senfter's substantial Symphony no. 4 Smiley Smiley! It's also a rare example of a symphony in the key of B major (Senfter apparently enjoyed writing in this key, as you can see from my list of her works) Grin! Unfortunately, it is the only one of her many orchestral works that can be heard-but that makes the recording of Symphony no. 4 all the more valuable Smiley. Perhaps CPO (or another enterprising record company) should check out Senfter's accomplished catalogue...
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« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2012, 08:59:03 pm »

Are you sure it's B Major (H-dur in German) not B-flat Major (B-dur)?
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kyjo
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« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2012, 10:04:03 pm »

Ah, you're probably right, Jim! Senfter's Wikipedia article lists it as being in B major, but klassika.info and Shamus' post say B-flat major. Aw, and I was really hoping for a B major symphony Grin! The only other B major symphonies I am aware of are Shostakovich 2, Haydn 46, Korngold Sinfonietta (a symphony in all but name), and a symphony by Georg Mann!
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