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relm1
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« Reply #45 on: September 07, 2013, 04:04:06 pm »

Is it possible for someone to upload the Hans Werner Henze Barcarola from Proms 26?  The conductor was Knussen and the link to hear the performance is a page not found.
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« Reply #46 on: November 04, 2013, 08:38:38 pm »

I have uploaded the only Symphony by Ilse Fromm-Michaels.
Though the work was written in 1938 it couldn't be performed until 1946 because F-M "was banned from performing or publishing her compositions" (wiki) by the Nazis.
It's a very complex piece, no easy-listening, but I think she deserves being rediscovered.
The conductor of this recording was her son Jost Michaels, also a renowned clarinettist and Pianist.
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« Reply #47 on: November 04, 2013, 11:32:05 pm »

Thanks to Mathias for the upload of the Fromm-Michaels Symphony Smiley

He says that it is "a very complex piece, no easy-listening". This may be true but should not put anyone off. The symphony is still very much in the received tradition of serious German symphonism and there is a determined solemnity about it which I find much appealing. Given the circumstances of its composition in 1938 when the composer can have had no hopes of it ever being performed the symphony is actually hugely impressive.

It is at least gratifying to see that the Symphony was given its first performance as early as 28 June 1946 in Hamburg by the North German Radio Symphony Orchestra under Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt-and what a fine conductor he was Smiley
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« Reply #48 on: November 06, 2013, 03:51:57 am »

I have a particualr interest in composers (and writers) banned, persecuted or murdered by the Nazis. Any perceived enemy of the Nazis is a friend of mine!

Fortunately Ilse Fromm-Michaels survived the war and now we hear her wonderful Symphony.

I find it complex and fascinating because it is short (only 20 minutes), but it contains all the elements of a classical symphony (1st movement, slow movement, scherzo and finale) and in such a short space sounds amazingly lonmg-breathed, in places almost Bruckerian. I find it very satisfying.
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« Reply #49 on: March 13, 2014, 12:51:38 am »

Manfred Trojahn: Symphony No. 1



From the collection of Karl Miller

Symphony 1 "Macrame"(1973-4)
Berlin Radio Symphony/ Peter Ruzicka



Wiki Bio:

Manfred Trojahn
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Manfred Trojahn (born 22 October 1949) is a German composer, flutist, conductor and writer.

Manfred Trojahn was born in Cremlingen in Lower Saxony and began his musical studies in 1966 in orchestra music at the music school of the city of Braunschweig. After graduating in 1970 he concluded his studies as a flutist at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater Hamburg with Karlheinz Zöller. From 1971 he studied composition with Diether de la Motte. He also studied with György Ligeti, conducting with Albert Bittner. Since 1991 he is professor for composition at the Robert Schumann Hochschule in Düsseldorf. From 2004 until 2006 he was practitioner of the Deutscher Komponistenverband (German Composers Association); since 2008 he is vice-director of the music section of the Academy of Fine Arts in Berlin.


From https://www.baerenreiter.com
Manfred Trojahn is married to the stage- and costume-designer Dietlind Konold. He lives in Düsseldorf and Paris.

“Manfred Trojahn, the author of a sizable body of large-scale orchestral works, chamber music, and especially vocal music for various forces and several full-length operas, occupies what is in many respects a unique position in the music history of recent decades. He has defined his aesthetic stance by distancing himself from the sort of narrow and increasingly sclerotic notion of the musical avant-garde that took hold in the post-war centers of contemporary music. In contrast, Trojahn's aesthetic and compositional technique hearkens back to the musical past and to several exemplary composers, whether the modernist music of the ‘fin de siècle’ or such figures as Benjamin Britten and Hans Werner Henze.

Besides these ties with the musical past, Trojahn's music is governed above all by his personal experience, and it is only natural that his specific thoughts on these experiences should be applied time and again in his works. Trojahn is a self-reflective, almost ‘serial’ composer who tends to produce groups of pieces tightly related in their structure and emotional content. All the same, his concern is to break through the hermeticism that has beset standard avant-garde fare. The main focus of his interests lies on the communicative potential of music that is contemporary in a strong sense of the term.”





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« Reply #50 on: March 13, 2014, 12:53:08 am »

Another Article about Trojahn from http://www.takte-online.de

On 22 October, Manfred Trojahn celebrated his 60th birthday. Robert Maschka looks for traces of the “old forms” in Trojahn’s oeuvre, in order to find modernity which reveals itself in all genres of the composer’s copious output.

When Johannes Brahms played his Handel Variations to Richard Wagner in 1864, Wagner is said to have praised his younger rival, saying: “One sees what can still be achieved with the old forms when someone comes along who knows how to handle them.” In today’s context, Wagner’s praise of Brahms sets the tone for the discussion of contemporary composing which oscillates between an avant-garde aesthetic and historically aware interaction with tradition. In particular, that quiet reservation about too great a slavishness to tradition, as is discernible in Wagner’s somewhat patronizing tone, has survived the passage of time. Yet around two generations later it was Arnold Schönberg of all people, the founding father of modern music, who lauded Brahms as a progressive.

Traditions of genre

With Manfred Trojahn, today’s music world has in its midst a composer who, albeit differently from Brahms, is still able to derive something from “the old forms”. And so, Trojahn’s oeuvre can easily be divided into traditional genres, something which can no longer be taken for granted nowadays, though Trojahn, thanks to the almost protean art of adaptation like the all-round composer of the 18th century, has written in almost all of the common musical genres. And yet there is a basic difference between Trojahn and these predecessors: he no longer takes the traditional forms and genres for granted. On the contrary, the historical distance is considered and taken as a theme in the way he conceives his works; this is discussed here in a brief examination of them.

In the music of La Folia for two pianos, composed in 1982, a free, connected section of toccata-like baroque figurative work leads into an epilogue disappearing into the highest extremities, in which the D minor world of the venerable Folia seems to disappear into the irretrievable. Trojahn chose a comparable central idea for Palinsesto, his homage to Schubert composed for string quartet and soprano in 1996. This can be described as a process of recalling Schubert’s Goethe setting Nähe des Geliebten: at first, fragments appear out of ethereal string figurations, as in a palimpsest, followed by the complete final verse of the song. Consequently, the strings fall into a resounding silence, but only the quotation of the Schubertian song epilogue marks the fully recognisable conclusion. Using another approach, Trojahn’s 3rd String Quartet of 1983 moves between different times: on the one hand it can be heard as a homage to Beethoven, in the flexible disposition of the highly taut parts, reacting and communicating with each other, particularly as the very limited motivic material of the four movements is exceptionally pointedly and concisely shaped. On the other hand, Beethoven is not heard in a single note; on the contrary, this is unmistakably an artist of the late 20th century which we hear, as recognised in the structure of the movements leaning towards aphorism, in the harmony and gestural characteristic shape of the sound formulations.

In his most recent symphony to date, the 5th Symphony of 2004, Trojahn again deals with traditional genres in several respects. Thus, with its large orchestral forces, this three-movement work already displays a symphonic approach striving for the monumental, confirmed in the first movement with its dense motivic work. The following Intermezzo, with its shadowy treatment of sound seems like a neo-Romantic character piece in the style of an uneasy piece of night music, whilst the concluding elegy in the peaceful breath of melos conjures up a symphonic image of time which makes the actuality of real time a distant memory.

Determining positions

To formulate a position musically may in any case be something which concerns Trojahn in his composing. In the Requiem of 1983/85, revised in 2003, motivic reference is made to Stravinsky’s Requiem Canticles in a carefully considered way. For, like Stravinsky, in his version of the Requiem Trojahn is not striving for a dramatic sound-picture version of the text – comparable with the requiem masses of the Romantic period – instead he is seeking a method of representation which draws the liturgical and sacramental function of the texts into the compositional calculus.

In other words, while Trojahn’s compositions involve determining positions to that which exists, the listener doesn’t hear a strange language, but one which, despite all its novelty, wants to express the seemingly familiar: a comprehensible sound idiom. And such a conscious positioning can even lead to a kind of extension of another composer’s style. As a result, even the uninformed listener to the Three Songs by Lord Tennyson of 1996 would, because of the lyrical characteristic style and the clear structure of the songs, think of the composer to whom they are dedicated, namely Benjamin Britten. In these songs, Trojahn shows that an art of song in the spirit of Britten is still possible today. And likewise his other song settings are, thanks to his ability to put expressivity, sensitivity and subtlety into music, a single refutation of that fashionable view that poetry in music is an outdated artistic expression; this is why Schumann’s Kinderscenen title of “Der Dichter spricht” could be applied to the song composer Trojahn.

Theatre in the opera

What effect does the striving for an historically-conscious stance in his compositions have on Trojahn’s operatic works? As adopting a position and playing a part are related principles, it is scarcely surprising that Trojahn conceives his operas according to the forces available. As a result, he has become a reviver of a type of music theatre of Mozartian or Italian influence, thought of in terms of protagonists. What is more, Trojahn almost submerges himself in each of his stage creations. And through this trick he gives the appearance of precisely not being an omniscient narrator, even if he lets the main characters be swept onto the stage by the roaring wind in the interludes in Was ihr wollt (1998).

Thus Trojahn’s stage characters provide information in an eminently theatrical, vital and eloquent way, which in itself is a mystery and is unsure of itself. As early as Enrico (1991) and Was ihr wollt, but also in the later operas Limonen aus Sizilien (2003) and La Grande Magia (2008) the play within the play, self-projection and with it the role which one performs to another, become metaphors of existence. Stylisation, quotation, allusion and innuendo are here compositional means in the depiction of that lost self assurance which Trojahn’s stage characters, searching for themselves, make into symbols of the modern state. Whilst the composer allows this broken sense of existence characteristic of today’s insecure person to become art, we may recognize why Trojahn, to return to Schönberg’s dictum on Brahms, is a progressive. And as a result, on his 60th birthday, we listen to his rich output, with the result that he becomes even more familiar to us as a person; for along with Brahms, Trojahn, whose music is a tonal language like scarcely anyone else’s of our time, could say of himself: “In my music, I speak.”

Robert Maschka
Translation: Elizabeth Robinson
from [t]akte 2/2009

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« Reply #51 on: March 18, 2014, 04:47:35 pm »

Dietr Acker: Symphony 1 "Lebenslaufe" (1977-8)

From the collection of Karl Miller

Symphony 1 "Lebenslaufe"
Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra/Dieter Cichiewicz
Radio Broadcast




From BachCantatas.Com
Born: November 3, 1940 - Sibiu, Romania
Died: May 27, 2006 - Munich, Germany

The German composer and pedagogue, Dieter Acker, was born in Sibiu, Romania of German parents. He studied piano, organ, and theory with Franz Xaver Dressler in Sibiu (1950-1958), then composition with Sigismund Todutza at the Cluj Conservatory (1959-1964),

After finishing his studiesm Dieter Acker taught theory and composition at the Cluj Conservatory (1964-1969). He then settled in West Germany and taught at the Robert Schumann Conservatory in Düsseldorf (1969-1972); he joined the faculty at the Munich Hochschule für Musik in 1972, where he was a professor of composition from 1976.

Machine Translation of Reviews of the First Symphony from the Acker Website at http://www.composeracker.de:



        
Symphony No. I ("Curriculum vitae", 1977 / 78)

THE WORLD
Sometimes it happens that behind the folds of the pretty stale "Musica - Viva - concerts" in Munich lost a friendly smile. Dieter Acker, the 39-year-old Harald Genzmer successor as Professor of composition at the Munich Academy of music, was responsible for this time. His Symphony No. I titled "Curriculum vitae" is expressive, Mahlerian dimensions be summoned. On different levels of instrumental romp a myriad of thoughts, making arable but easily done. The bushes always permeable.

The naive honesty of this musical resumes disarmed. (vb)



MÜNCHNER MERKUR
...ein highly expressive work...The three movements are a serious one: in the ductus in Sonic density, in the interpretation.

...Acker fondness for swirling sounds for the grotesque, deep bass, Glissandi and shrill trumpets, sound volume and Ambitus remain in the memory. (K.R.Brachtel)

 
SÜDDEUTSCHE ZEITUNG
It was looking forward to the premiere of the first Symphony by Dieter Acker. ...da step meaning pregnant huge brass choirs, because conversations between the soloists of the Orchestra spin, so to speak on SideShow, chatter loudly woodwind and sighing heavily the strings. Is the climax of the first movement a kind of "Breakthrough" - to new horizons? Fine Zieseliertes characterizes the second sentence ("delicate and transparent")..., the third then brings the final on Gipfelung in the symphonic drama.

Field can bypass audible with the Orchestra, he has a keen sense for effective sound layers, also for "grateful" orchestral parts. (W.Schreiber)



TZ - MUNICH
...His Opus stands out strikingly from the cosmopolitan egalitarianism of much of modernist productions...


HANNOVERSCHE ALLGEMEINE ZEITUNG (03.02.1982)
"The days of new music in Hanover final concert"

...The Symphony works with all "materials" of the huge modern Symphony Orchestra. No doubt, field has an accurate knowledge of orchestral instruments and know how they as can be used effectively.

The Symphony has failed, is serious, powerful, and testifies to honest craftsmanship. (E. Limmert)



HAMBURGER ABENDBLATT (03.02.1982)
The Munich-based composer Dieter Acker has a heart for the listener.

He understands the Orchestra - all over the world as in groups and parts - so to deal with it,

Repertoire - that the factory might have prospects.



HANNOVERSCHE NEUE PRESSE (03.02.1982)
...Are here (Henze) the instrumental skills of each individual required down to the last, so this also applies to Dieter Acker Symphony recorded with great audience approval. (R.Hollmann)



THE WORLD (04.02.1982)
...Arable composed, rather than against the Orchestra. He shares the nerve for the "language" of instruments and the compatibility or incompatibility of their characters with Berlioz and Strauss, without however in the programmatic or illustrative. But he has the audience in mind: this may is lucky, not only to read musical progressions and developments, but also listening to play with. (Lesle)



STUTTGARTER ZEITUNG (17.02.1982)
The world, the he (Acker) builds by symphonic means is not a degradation product (Kirchner / Symphony), but original. Acker's three-movement Symphony works with shapes, figures and gestures, which are observable birth and growth: triumph of the goethean development idea, which for decades was faded in the rigging of serial predisposition, specific solidification or full-field condition descriptions. The records a story ever own by Red threads and no longer impose the listeners as he can retain and recognize. (Lutz.L)



WUPPERTAL NEWSPAPER (08.10.1979)
First Symphony by Dieter Acker ...die was heard in an impressive interpretation: she a Mahlerian intensity music demonstrated... a work with the field has reached a stage of unzweifel-cash Cup.

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« Reply #52 on: March 18, 2014, 06:00:42 pm »

Music of Johann Cilensek


From the collection of Karl Miller

Concert Piece for Flute and Orchestra
Richard Varga, flute
Berlin Symphony Orchestra/Gunther Herbig

Radio broadcast, date unknown

Bio from Qwika.com-- machine translation
 Johann Cilenšek (* 4. December 1913 in Grossdubrau; † 14. December 1998) was a German composer and university teacher as well as a vice-practitioner of the academy of the arts of the GDR.

Johann Cilenšek was born 1913 as a son of a porcelain turner in the Saxonian Grossdubrau ( close Bautzen) and visited from 1924 to 1933 the high school in Bautzen. 1933 it was committed to 1934 in the porcelain factory Hermsdorf to the realm work service and worked. it studied 1935 to 1939 at church-musical Institut in Leipzig with Johann Nepomuk David (composition) and Friedrich Högner (organ). it joined 1937 the NSDAP . From beginning of war 1939 to end of war 1945 it was conscripted as Schleifer and turners.

1945 joined Cilenšek of the KPD and 1946 the SED . He became a teacher and 1947 professor for clay/tone set and composition at the Thuringian national conservatoire. It was 1951 to 1956 and 1964 to 1966 of chairmen of the regional organization Thuringia of the federation of German composers, in addition since 1961 member of the academy of the arts. Starting from 1966 it was as successors of Werner Felix Rektor of the university for music Franz Liszt Weimar until 1972. 1978 he became vice-practitioner of the academy of the arts. Cilenšek emeritierte 1980.

It received the national price and 1983 the patriotic earnings/service medal to 1970.

Cilenšek composed five symphonies, piano concerts, a concert for organ and caper orchestra, concerts for solo instruments and orchestra, silhouettes for 15 solo strike ago, a mosaic for large caper orchestra, Sonaten, choir works and songs.

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« Reply #53 on: March 18, 2014, 06:10:21 pm »

Eduard Erdmann: Rhapsody and Rondo(1946)


From the collection of Karl Miller


Rhapsody and Rondo (Concertino) for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 18
Paul Baumgartner, piano
Hannover Radio Symphony Orchestra/Willy Steiner
This work was dedicated to Paul Baumgartner, who also played in the work's premiere in 1948.


Wikipedia Bio:

Eduard Erdmann (5 March 1896 – 21 June 1958) was a Baltic German pianist and composer.

Erdmann was born in Wenden (Cēsis) in the Governorate of Livonia. He was the great-nephew of the philosopher Johann Eduard Erdmann. His first musical studies were in Riga, where his teachers were Bror Möllersten and Jean du Chastain (piano) and Harald Creutzburg (harmony and counterpoint). From 1914 he studied piano in Berlin with Conrad Ansorge and composition with Heinz Tiessen. In the 1920s and early 1930s his name was frequently cited among Germany's leading composers. Moreover, Erdmann had an international reputation as an outstanding concert pianist whose repertoire encompassed Beethoven and the advocacy of contemporary music. In 1925, he gave the premiere of Artur Schnabel's Piano Sonata, at the Venice ISCM Festival.[1]

From 1925 he was professor of piano at the Cologne Academy of Music but was forced to resign from his post by the Nazis in 1935 and became an 'inner exile', composing almost nothing until after the end of World War II. He joined the Nazi Party in 1937; while not in sympathy with National Socialism, his decision was to avoid government harassment so that he could continue to work, like several other German musicians at the time. This action ruined his post-war reputation, and it did not recover in his lifetime.[2] He resumed teaching as Professor of Piano at the Hochschule für Musik in Hamburg in 1950, but died of a heart-attack in 1958. His students at Hamburg included Aloys and Alfons Kontarsky. There has been little revival of interest in his own music and all his post-World War II works remain in manuscript; considering his inter-war eminence, he has received remarkably little attention up to the present day, but in 2006 the cpo label began issuing a series of CDs of his orchestral works.

Erdmann came to critical notice as a composer with the sensational success of his First Symphony (dedicated to Alban Berg) in 1919. He was also close friends with Ferruccio Busoni's pupil Philipp Jarnach, as well as Ernst Krenek, Artur Schnabel and Emil Nolde. Like Tiessen and Schnabel, he was deeply impressed by Schoenbergian and Bergian Expressionism but did not adopt the twelve-note method, preferring a freely and often totally chromatic vocabulary with little or no sense of key. His total output is quite small, and surprisingly contains very little piano music: but it came to include four symphonies, Nos. 3 and 4 dating from after World War II and thus still unpublished (although the Third Symphony was recorded and released on the CPO label with the Capricci opus 21).[3] As early as 1920 Erdmann issued a credo in which he declared himself opposed to the extreme individualism in music from Ludwig van Beethoven to Arnold Schoenberg, and dedicated instead to the creation of a more objective music characterized by what he called the 'third-person forms' created by composers from Heinrich Schütz to Anton Bruckner.

Between 1921 and 1943, Erdmann often appeared with the Australian violinist Alma Moodie, who lived in Germany.[4] Erdmann dedicated his Sonata for Solo Violin, Op. 12 (1921) to her, and she premiered it in Berlin in October 1921.[5] The Australian-English critic Walter J. Turner wrote of a recital he heard them play in London in April 1934, ‘it was the best violin piano duo that I have ever heard’. Their last concert together was given on 4 March 1943, three days before Alma Moodie's death, when they were in the middle of the cycle of Beethoven sonatas.
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« Reply #54 on: April 06, 2014, 09:45:33 pm »

The link to the Meyer Sinfonia Concertante posted by Rainolf does not appear to be working. When I click on it I am directed to my own Mediafire account page.
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« Reply #55 on: April 06, 2014, 11:43:28 pm »

Thanks for your reply, Dundonnell!

I have modified the link. Does it work now? And is there such a problem with the link to Finke's Suite, too?

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« Reply #56 on: April 07, 2014, 12:31:07 am »

The Meyer link now works perfectly and the Finke download had no problem attached to it Smiley
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« Reply #57 on: February 06, 2015, 07:32:44 pm »

Klaus Pringsheim -- Concerto in C for Orchestra


From the collection of Karl Miller


Concerto in C for Orchestra
Munich Philharmonic
Composer, Conductor
Date, venue unknown

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« Reply #58 on: September 03, 2015, 03:46:16 pm »

Under the "United States" composers downloads, I post a collection of Karl Miller's tracks of American Pianist Byron Janis's interpretation of  Richard Strauss's Burlesque.  Enjoy.
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