The Art-Music Forum
November 15, 2019, 04:28:33 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Here you may discover hundreds of little-known composers, hear thousands of long-forgotten compositions, contribute your own rare (non-copyright) recordings, and discuss all the Arts in an erudite and decorous atmosphere full of freedom and delight. To participate, simply log in or register.
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

German Music


Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: German Music  (Read 4702 times)
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2012, 07:47:50 pm »

Thanks from me as well, Roelof Smiley

For those interested in hearing more of Rosenfeld's music, his Piano and Cello Concertos as well as a Scherzo for violin and small orchestra are on YouTube. All are worthwhile listening Smiley

But, then again, I probably shouldn't be bringing up or praising YouTube-see Colin's post: http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,2049.0.html

 Undecided
Report Spam   Logged
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #31 on: December 22, 2012, 04:42:32 pm »

Thank you, Sicmu, for the Kurt Thomas Christmas Oratorio, just in time for the holidays Smiley

Here's an article on Thomas from bach-cantatas.com:

The prominent German choral conductor, pedagogue, and composer, (Georg Hugo) Kurt Thomas, passed his school years at Lennep in Rhineland and received some musical instruction from Hermann Inderan at Barmen. He entered the Leipzig Konservatorium in 1922, where he studied the piano with Robert Teichmüller, theory with Max Ludwig and composition with Hermann Grabner. Whilst in Leipzig, Thomas came into contact with Karl Straube, who was Thomaskantor at the time and who became the young student’s mentor and gave him constant help and advice. After Leipzig, he went on to study composition with Arnold Mendelssohn in Darmstadt.

 Kurt Thomas' first significant successes were as a composer: in 1927 he came first in a competition and was awarded the newly-created Prussian ‘Beethoven Prize’ for his Mass and St Mark Passion. Rapidly he became one of the leading figures in the church-music revival movement in progress during the 1920’s. He was a composer of quite exceptional promise and has already written several notable works. His a cappella Mass in A minor for solo voices and two choirs, composed when he was 19, is a work of singular beauty and of remarkable maturity and sureness of touch. While intensely modern and individual in technique and idiom, it was by no means extravagant or revolutionary. It was performed twice at the Leipzig Thomaskirche and in other towns, and has always produced a profound impression, notably at the 55th Festival of the Allgemeiner Deutscher Musikverein held in 1925 at Kiel, when the critics from all over Germany showed a rare unanimity in declaring it to be the outstanding feature of the Festival. His pianoforte trio, performed in 1925 at a concert of the International Society for Contemporary Music, is also a fine and admirably written work, sometimes a little ruthless in its dissonances but full of real substance and vigorous life.

 Kurt Thomas taught theory and composition at the Leipzig Konservatorium from 1925 to 1934, and was conductor of the choir at the Institute of Church Music in Leipzig from 1928 to 1934. In 1934 he became professor for choral conducting in Berlin, a post he held until 1939. The first of three volumes of his handbook of choral conducting was published in 1935; reprinted several times, it has remained a standard work to this day. From 1939 to 1945 he headed the newly-founded ‘Musisches Gymnasium’ in Frankfurt am Main. In Frankfurt he was also Kantor of the Dreikönigskirche from 1945 to 1956.

 In 1947 Kurt Thomas began lecturing in choral conducting at the North German Music Academy in Detmold (what is today the Detmold Musikhochschule), a post he held until 1955. His numerous concert tours with various choirs in the ensuing years enhanced his reputation as a choir director of outstanding ability. It was therefore not surprising that he was offered the post of Thomaskantor following Günther Ramin’s sudden death in 1956. Thomas represented a return to the old tradition – interrupted by Karl Straube and Günther Ramin - of Thomaskantors who were also composers.

 The first concerts conducted by the new Thomaskantor were enough to make the differences between him and his predecessor clear. Unlike Günther Ramin, whose interpretations frequently had an improvisatory quality, Thomas set great store by comprehensive and accurate rehearsals. In contrasts to Günther Ramin’s somewhat Romantic approach to Bach, he pursued a style characterised more by historical authencity, which demanded a good deal of rethinking from his Thomaskirche choristers and consequently required a period of adjustment. Once they had found their bearings, they and their new conductor were hugely successful, both in Leipzig and on tour.

 But Kurt Thomas fell soon with the GDR cultural approach, who were hampering and even refusing permission for concert tours in the West. At the same time, socialist arts policies were aimed at gaining more control over the church and Thomas was forced to waste ever more time on frustrating (and frequently futile) negotiations with functionaries of the ruling Socialist Unity Party, Finally, at the end of 1960, he provocatively made his remaining in office contingent upon obtaining approval for a concert tour to East Germany. This not being forthcoming, he decided to remain in the Federal Republic of Germany (where he happened to be at the time). In West Germany, he first resumed his post with the Frankfurt am Main Dreikönigskirche, and also took over the direction of the Cologne Bachverein and the Frankfurt Kantorei. In 1966 (or 1969) began teaching choral conducting at what is today the Lübeck Musikhochschule.

 Publications: The important manual Lehrbuch der Chorleitung (3 volumes, Leipzig, 1935-1948).
 Compositions: Many choral works, including a Mass (1925), Passionmusik nach den Evangelisten Markus, Weihnachts-Oratorium, Auferstebungs-Oratorium, cantatas, Psalms, and motets; several orchestral works, including a Piano Concerto; chamber music, organ pieces, and songs.


It might also be worth mentioning that in 1936 Thomas won a silver medal in the art competitions of the Olympic Games for his Olympic Cantata. Also, he wrote a Violin Concerto which is not mentioned in the above article.

Here is a picture of him:

http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-Bio/Thomas-Kurt-1.jpg

 Smiley
Report Spam   Logged
BrianA
Level 4
****

Times thanked: 28
Offline Offline

Posts: 260


View Profile
« Reply #32 on: May 21, 2013, 02:11:03 am »

Rainolf,

The link you so kindly provided for the Cilencek symphony no 2 unfortunately does not seem to be working.

Brian
Report Spam   Logged
fr8nks
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 5
Offline Offline

Posts: 95


View Profile
« Reply #33 on: May 21, 2013, 12:49:57 pm »

It works if you remove # and replace it with /?
Report Spam   Logged
BrianA
Level 4
****

Times thanked: 28
Offline Offline

Posts: 260


View Profile
« Reply #34 on: May 21, 2013, 03:13:46 pm »

Got it.  Thanks!
Report Spam   Logged
Rainolf
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 2
Offline Offline

Posts: 21


View Profile
« Reply #35 on: May 21, 2013, 06:49:44 pm »

I have now changed the # to a ? in the link to the symphony, hope it works now.

Report Spam   Logged
Dundonnell
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 134
Offline Offline

Posts: 4286


View Profile WWW
« Reply #36 on: May 22, 2013, 01:11:39 am »

Considering how little of Holler's music has been recorded this latest addition by Rainolof of a very substantial orchestral is very much welcomed Smiley

Incidentally, this work is sometimes nicknamed the "Bamberg Cathedral Symphony". Holler wrote two numbered symphonies which are(were) available on a very difficult to obtain Ambitus cd. I must say that I found them worthy.....but a trifle dull.
Report Spam   Logged
kyjo
Guest
« Reply #37 on: May 22, 2013, 01:44:45 am »

I would also like to thank Rainolf for the Cilensek and Holler works Smiley
Report Spam   Logged
britishcomposer
Level 4
****

Times thanked: 33
Online Online

Posts: 250


View Profile
« Reply #38 on: May 22, 2013, 01:33:21 pm »

Re Höller op. 18: the performing orchestra is the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra. The work had been uploaded by a youtuber last year but is no longer available.

Colin, I conjure you to listen again to the symphonies. Esp. No. 2 is a very characteristic work, brilliantly orchestrated. I love his somewhat cloddish harmonies.
Report Spam   Logged
Dundonnell
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 134
Offline Offline

Posts: 4286


View Profile WWW
« Reply #39 on: May 22, 2013, 02:15:25 pm »

Re Höller op. 18: the performing orchestra is the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra. The work had been uploaded by a youtuber last year but is no longer available.

Colin, I conjure you to listen again to the symphonies. Esp. No. 2 is a very characteristic work, brilliantly orchestrated. I love his somewhat cloddish harmonies.

I shall certainly take your advice Smiley

I also have the Frescobaldi Variations and the Sweeelinck Variations on an old DGG cd.
Report Spam   Logged
gabriel
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 15
Offline Offline

Posts: 41


View Profile
« Reply #40 on: May 22, 2013, 08:01:48 pm »

I add more information about Holler´s work:

 Hymn uber gregorianische Choralmelodien, Opus 18 (1932/4)
1. Toccata   6:51
2. Ricercare    11:18
3. Adoration uber den Hymnus   5:46
4. Fantasie und Fuge   11:42

Karl Holler; Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart

Thanks a lot for the uploader!

Report Spam   Logged
Rainolf
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 2
Offline Offline

Posts: 21


View Profile
« Reply #41 on: May 22, 2013, 08:25:47 pm »

Thanks for the Information, Gabriel!

I have Höller's Piano Concerto, too, and will soon upload it.
Report Spam   Logged
gabriel
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 15
Offline Offline

Posts: 41


View Profile
« Reply #42 on: May 23, 2013, 01:57:17 am »

Thanks again, Rainolf!

More information about Holler´s piano concerto:

Piano Concerto, Op. 63 ”Bamberger” (1972/73)

It´s a 1973 live radio broadcast.
Artists:
Ludwig Hoffmann, piano.
Bamberger Symphoniker. 
Martin Turnovsky, conductor
Report Spam   Logged
britishcomposer
Level 4
****

Times thanked: 33
Online Online

Posts: 250


View Profile
« Reply #43 on: August 21, 2013, 05:17:27 pm »

I have uploaded the Symphony by the German composer Peter Ronnefeld.
He wrote it in 1952, aged 17. You will find a short (German) introduction included.
He was also a gifted conductor. If anyone is interested I have a powerful recording of the Robert Browning Overture by Charles Ives, conducted by Ronnefeld.
I don’t know the reason for his early death. His son Matthias, also a gifted composer and recorded by Dacapo, died even younger from diabetes. Maybe this was the reason for his fathers death, too.

http://www.universaledition.com/Peter-Ronnefeld/composers-and-works/composer/609/biography

The publisher states that the symphony lasts only 15 minutes, my recording takes about 25 min.
http://www.ricordi.de/ronnefeld-peter.0.html
Report Spam   Logged
Dundonnell
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 134
Offline Offline

Posts: 4286


View Profile WWW
« Reply #44 on: August 26, 2013, 03:11:53 pm »

Sicmu posted recordings of the Bernhard Heiden Symphony No.2 and the Triple Concerto in the German Music Downloads thread. There is an argument that Heiden was just as much an American composer as a German:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernhard_Heiden

I wonder about the provenance of these recordings and the identities of the performers: the "R.E. Symphony Orchestra" and the "Philharmonic Orchestra" Huh Who they Huh Grin
Report Spam   Logged

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum


Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy