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Hubert Parry - English Lyrics now available complete at last!


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Author Topic: Hubert Parry - English Lyrics now available complete at last!  (Read 162 times)
Albion
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Henry Hugo Pierson (1815-1873)


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« on: January 18, 2019, 12:08:18 am »

Coming from a small label, Somm, this is a high-quality series finally giving us all twelve sets of Parry's English Lyrics plus a number of separate sonnet settings on three CDs. As with their ongoing series of Stanford's String Quartets, production values are of the highest. Sung impeccably by the stellar line-up of Susan Gritton (sop), Sarah Fox (sop), James Gilchrist (ten) and Roderick Williams (bar) these discs totalling three hours will give immense pleasure and show an area of Parry's output that is still too-little recognised... the ability to succinctly capture a mood or thought and, above all, an unsurpassed treatment of the English language. Many of the songs reflect difficulties in Parry's own life, especially regarding his problematic marriage to the cold and hypochondriacal Maude, and it seems as though he regarded his song-output as a platform on which to express his most personal thoughts.

 Smiley


https://www.somm-recordings.com/?s=parry
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A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

cilgwyn
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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2019, 12:50:19 am »

Somm have got a recording of Stanford's The Travelling Companion in the works too,I believe?!! 
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2019, 09:57:41 am »

I've bought all the Some English Lyrics and had a very enjoyable listen to them all in their sets the other day. Wonderful to have them all at last.

And that is marvellous about The Traveling Companion. It's appalling that not one opera by Stanford has had a proper complete recording.
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2019, 10:54:31 am »

Stanford's The Travelling Companion. Who'd have thought?!! Shocked Grin There are some links to reviews at the bottom of the page. I didn't realise Stanford had a website! Very nice! Smiley

http://www.thestanfordsociety.org/the-travelling-companion-2018/
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2019, 05:52:26 pm »

It's appalling that not one opera by Stanford has had a proper complete recording.

Indeed it is! In an ideal world we would have fully professional recordings of The Canterbury Pilgrims, Shamus O'Brien, Much Ado About Nothing, The Critic and The Travelling Companion. It's such a shame that Peter Moores of Opera Rara had a self-admitted aversion to Britain's operatic heritage. Likewise, there is so much of value by Arthur Goring Thomas, Ethel Smyth, Josef Holbrooke, Rutland Boughton, et al. that will probably never see the light of day again... In the meantime, more modest projects such as this from Somm should command the highest appreciation and generous sales figures.

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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2019, 01:34:56 am »

John, Smyth at least is finally getting somewhere: Retrospect Opera have done The Boatswain's Mate, re-released The Wreckers and Fete Galante will be out probably this year. They are hunting for Entente Cordiale, but no one seems to know where the score is. As for the others, I can only agree sadly. Opera is always the last priority. How ridiculous that a composer known mainly for opera like Boughton should have all his symphonies and so few of his operas available.
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2019, 01:26:35 pm »

One caould also mention the total absence of any recording of the works of Stephen Storace (1762-1706). He achieved early career success in Vienna, having a few productions there of his first works. After his sister's banishment from Vianna* the Storaces moved home to London, where both took up major positions with Sheridan at the Drury Lane Theatre. Stephen died (allegedly of flu contracted during long overnight rehearsals) in his 30s.  Nancy went on to sing in the Oxford UK premiere of The Seasons by her old Vienna friend - Joseph Haydn.

Most of Stephen's London works were issued in vocal score editions by his publishers, Longman & Broderip - these are extenisvely cued with the orchestral solo parts (SS was a meticulous client for Longman & Broderip) and could be rairly easily returned to a putative full version.  Sadly his greatest work (according to the memoirs of orchestral players who performed them), Dido, Queen of Carthage, didn't survive. (The oboist Parke claimed it was 'too complicated for the London public).

While still a student, I staged the first modern revival of The Siege Of Belgrade (1791) - but no recording (perhaps luckily!) survives :-)  His operas are an endearing amalgam of Mozartian ensembles and arias (for the rest of his 'Vienna' crew in London) plus comic songs for the established audience favourites among the cast. He also wrote some solo shows for the theatre's 'music-ha;;' stars, such as the popular singing comedian Richard 'Dicky' Suett. 'My Grandmother' remained in the Drury Lane repertoire for nearly 50 years - with its famous comic dance routine 'Dicky's Walk'.


* the soprano Anna 'Nancy' Storace - prima buffa in Vianna, the first to perform Susanna in Mozart's FIGARO, and for whom many other Vienna roles were written, e.g. by Salieri.  Allegedly the Austrian Emperor's mistress, we can only guess at the reasons behind her catastrophic overnight fall from favour
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Albion
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Henry Hugo Pierson (1815-1873)


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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2019, 01:11:20 am »

For those of a pedantic nature, the first track of volume 3 should be listed 10.1 not 11.1.

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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2019, 10:51:46 am »

I just noticed at the "other" forum (not Sydney's or his alter ego?) that Hubert Parry's oratorio,Judith,is going to be performed and then recorded for release by Chandos. ("Spine tingling choruses and a dramatic story").
Wow! All these works that,only,thirty,odd,years ago,you thought you would never hear,being recorded! What next I wonder?!! Shocked Grin

http://londonenglishsongfestival.org/judith
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jimfin
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2019, 12:30:57 pm »

One caould also mention the total absence of any recording of the works of Stephen Storace (1762-1706). He achieved early career success in Vienna, having a few productions there of his first works. After his sister's banishment from Vianna* the Storaces moved home to London, where both took up major positions with Sheridan at the Drury Lane Theatre. Stephen died (allegedly of flu contracted during long overnight rehearsals) in his 30s.  Nancy went on to sing in the Oxford UK premiere of The Seasons by her old Vienna friend - Joseph Haydn.

Most of Stephen's London works were issued in vocal score editions by his publishers, Longman & Broderip - these are extenisvely cued with the orchestral solo parts (SS was a meticulous client for Longman & Broderip) and could be rairly easily returned to a putative full version.  Sadly his greatest work (according to the memoirs of orchestral players who performed them), Dido, Queen of Carthage, didn't survive. (The oboist Parke claimed it was 'too complicated for the London public).

While still a student, I staged the first modern revival of The Siege Of Belgrade (1791) - but no recording (perhaps luckily!) survives :-)  His operas are an endearing amalgam of Mozartian ensembles and arias (for the rest of his 'Vienna' crew in London) plus comic songs for the established audience favourites among the cast. He also wrote some solo shows for the theatre's 'music-ha;;' stars, such as the popular singing comedian Richard 'Dicky' Suett. 'My Grandmother' remained in the Drury Lane repertoire for nearly 50 years - with its famous comic dance routine 'Dicky's Walk'.


* the soprano Anna 'Nancy' Storace - prima buffa in Vianna, the first to perform Susanna in Mozart's FIGARO, and for whom many other Vienna roles were written, e.g. by Salieri.  Allegedly the Austrian Emperor's mistress, we can only guess at the reasons behind her catastrophic overnight fall from favour

I wonder whether Retrospect Opera, who have been recording various works of Dibdin, might turn to Storage in time. At least one of their number is interested in him, as we discussed him over dinner a year or so ago. Although my main interest is 1850-1950 I wouldn't be sorry to hear more from the 'darkest age' of English music, 1780-1830 or so, after Arne, Boyce and Linley died and before Balfe and Wallace got going.
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