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New July cds


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Dundonnell
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« on: July 06, 2018, 01:54:51 pm »

Self-indulgent I know....but it is so nice to receive a big packet containing:

Kalvei Aho's Piano Concerto No.1 and Timpani Concerto (BIS)
Sir Richard Rodney Bennett's Symphony No.2 etc. (Chandos)
Feliks Nowowiejski's Symphonies Nos. 2 and 3 (Dux)
Franz Reizenstein's and Berthold Goldschmidt's Cello Concertos (CPO)

 Smiley
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2018, 07:56:25 pm »

Bennett's 2nd Symphony is not to my taste (but I did know that already!). Bennett in 1960s quasi-serial mode is a lot less attractive than his much more "listener-friendly" music of the later decades of his life when he deliberately changed his idiom to abandon what he recognised was the sterility of the earlier music.
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Greg K
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« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2018, 01:48:52 am »

Reizenstein's Cello Concerto is the piece that most intrigues me.
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PJ
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« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2018, 08:00:07 am »

And me, too. And I'd like to get the previous volume (Gal and Castelnuovo-Tedesco in this new CPO series of cello concertos.
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« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2018, 10:55:56 am »


To be honest I found that cd disappointing. I had the Gal already from Avie and the Castelnuovo-Tedesco is not one of his better works. Only my opinion of course!
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PJ
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« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2018, 11:05:07 am »

And me, too. And I'd like to get the previous volume (Gal and Castelnuovo-Tedesco in this new CPO series of cello concertos.
[/quote/]

To be honest I found that cd disappointing. I had the Gal already from Avie and the Castelnuovo-Tedesco is not one of his better works. Only my opinion of course!

Have you got the other Nowowiejski Dux?

 https://www.prestoclassical.co.uk/classical/products/8429384--nowowiejski-symphonic-works
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2018, 11:11:11 am »

No I haven't. Is it worth buying I wonder? Dux cds are not cheap and I guess that I was saving my money to buy the symphonies when they appeared. The other cd is of much earlier music; the kind of disc I would once have bought when I had more income (pre-retirement) but I have bought a lot of new cds in the last month or two!

I shall buy it if encouraged to do so (by those who place a premium on my musical education and less of my financial stability!!)
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2018, 11:13:44 am »

I shall report back on the Reizenstein very soon!!

.....like Now Grin

It is a very "big" work, passionate and enormously accomplished for a 25 year old émigré from Germany to the UK. Yes it does sound more influenced by Vaughan Williams than German romanticism although the influence of Reizenstein's early teacher, Hindemith, is certainly present. Unlike Hans Gal-who never, it seems to me escapes his nostalgia for a lost Schubertian soundworld- Reizenstein is writing his majestic "calling-card" for his new life in the UK but with deep sadness for the circumstances which had led him to abandon his native land combined with an acceptance that he now has to find his new voice, his distinctive idiom in a new country.
It is quite extraordinary that it (like the Violin Concerto) should have been virtually ignored for so long. One of the best "British" cello concertos of its generation and many thanks to Wallfisch for rescuing it from totally undeserved oblivion Smiley

(The very informative booklet notes describe the appalling treatment the older and "more established" Goldschmidt received at the hands of a musical establishment which treated him as an unwelcome German outsider. I suppose the fact that Egon Wellesz got himself an imortant job teaching in Oxford helped him gain acceptance. Goldschmidt never did, either as composer or conductor. Shameful blot on our supposed British "tolerance"!! No wonder so many emigre composers preferred to end up in the USA!)
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Greg K
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« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2018, 09:01:00 am »

Surprised to see the Goldschmidt/Reizenstein CD already posted to (US) YouTube, where I had a listen.  A Hindemith influence, yes, I can hear that, - but Vaughan Williams?
In any case, not at all an easy piece for me to assimilate (or like) on first exposure (the Violin Concerto impresses me far more, - but this can change), and I certainly don't hear the "deep sadness" you (or the note writer?) refer to.  The "long line" is entirely absent.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2018, 01:44:06 pm »

I apologise for being misleading. I can understand that my reference to the "sadness" of both composers at fleeing from their native country implied that this meant that the concertos themselves contain "sad music". They do not do so. My choice of language and expression should have been better thought through!!
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2018, 09:17:09 pm »

Now I can understand why it has taken so long - 30 years in fact- for Kalevi Aho's Piano Concerto No.1 to be recorded. It is probably Aho's most uncompromisingly modernistic,difficult work. I doubt whether I could really make the effort to sit through it again. 
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relm1
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« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2018, 01:06:51 am »

Now I can understand why it has taken so long - 30 years in fact- for Kalevi Aho's Piano Concerto No.1 to be recorded. It is probably Aho's most uncompromisingly modernistic,difficult work. I doubt whether I could really make the effort to sit through it again. 

I think it is no worse than his Cello Concerto No. 1 which is very terse but I grant that the cello tends to be monophonic.  The soundscape is terse and the ending is beautiful.  I usually wait to hear the ending to consider the merit of a work because sort of like Shostakovitch Symphony No. 4, the meaning of the symphony is revealed in the coda.  So you have to survive through 60 minutes of a very unstable, violent, terse music to get to the deeply troubled nature of the coda that tells you 'Abandon hope all ye who enter here'.  What do you think of his Symphony No. 5?  This is sort of the concerto equivalent to it.  Another way to think about it is in spite of the challenges, trials, and tribulations experienced, you have no idea how much despair is even possible.  It's very pessimistic and late Mahlerian as is Shosti No. 4.  Aho used to be a deeply melancholic person.  He does say his world view changed I forget exactly when but I think in the early 1990's when he had kids and started to think beyond his own struggles.  I love large scale works of personal nature.  These are composers who grapple with existential crisis and put that angst foremost into their art. 
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Grandenorm
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« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2018, 11:43:39 am »

Dante wrote: Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate. All (lit. "every") hope abandon, ye who enter here.
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relm1
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« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2018, 02:45:43 pm »

Dante wrote: Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate. All (lit. "every") hope abandon, ye who enter here.

Well I was going off memory and with a glass of wine!  Tongue
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2018, 04:53:16 pm »

Now I can understand why it has taken so long - 30 years in fact- for Kalevi Aho's Piano Concerto No.1 to be recorded. It is probably Aho's most uncompromisingly modernistic,difficult work. I doubt whether I could really make the effort to sit through it again. 

I think it is no worse than his Cello Concerto No. 1 which is very terse but I grant that the cello tends to be monophonic.  The soundscape is terse and the ending is beautiful.  I usually wait to hear the ending to consider the merit of a work because sort of like Shostakovitch Symphony No. 4, the meaning of the symphony is revealed in the coda.  So you have to survive through 60 minutes of a very unstable, violent, terse music to get to the deeply troubled nature of the coda that tells you 'Abandon hope all ye who enter here'.  What do you think of his Symphony No. 5?  This is sort of the concerto equivalent to it.  Another way to think about it is in spite of the challenges, trials, and tribulations experienced, you have no idea how much despair is even possible.  It's very pessimistic and late Mahlerian as is Shosti No. 4.  Aho used to be a deeply melancholic person.  He does say his world view changed I forget exactly when but I think in the early 1990's when he had kids and started to think beyond his own struggles.  I love large scale works of personal nature.  These are composers who grapple with existential crisis and put that angst foremost into their art. 

Thank you for this most sensible and thoughtful post. Your perspective is thoroughly insightful Smiley
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