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(Some) Twentieth Century American Symphonies Not on CD (again!)


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Latvian
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« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2018, 09:49:42 pm »

Yes, I do have the Rouse Organ Concerto. Please give me some time to work on this, but I will gladly upload all the requests when I can -- I've been having severe problems with my laptop.
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« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2018, 12:50:38 am »

Yes, I do have the Rouse Organ Concerto. Please give me some time to work on this, but I will gladly upload all the requests when I can -- I've been having severe problems with my laptop.

Awesome!  Waiting patiently  Grin 
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« Reply #17 on: May 23, 2018, 02:49:48 pm »

Listening, in considerable astonishment, to Kevin Puts's Second Symphony it occurs to me that if the composer had produced this in the early 60s in an American university music school he would have suffered the same fate as Arnold Rosner. His teachers would have utterly rejected the music as unacceptably over-emotional with a ridiculously old-fashioned approach to an outmoded reliance on beauty of utterance.

How the world has changed that music like this is performed by a music conservatory orchestra under a leading conductor when the music of those who condemned and rejected Rosner is, if not forgotten, no longer the Only acceptable music permitted a hearing!!

....and Puts is chair of the Peabody composition faculty rather than being driven into suburban New York obscurity (like Rosner)

My deepest thanks for bringing it to my attention! This is what participation in a music forum is for!!
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« Reply #18 on: May 23, 2018, 03:30:00 pm »

Listening, in considerable astonishment, to Kevin Puts's Second Symphony it occurs to me that if the composer had produced this in the early 60s in an American university music school he would have suffered the same fate as Arnold Rosner. His teachers would have utterly rejected the music as unacceptably over-emotional with a ridiculously old-fashioned approach to an outmoded reliance on beauty of utterance.

How the world has changed that music like this is performed by a music conservatory orchestra under a leading conductor when the music of those who condemned and rejected Rosner is, if not forgotten, no longer the Only acceptable music permitted a hearing!!

....and Puts is chair of the Peabody composition faculty rather than being driven into suburban New York obscurity (like Rosner)

My deepest thanks for bringing it to my attention! This is what participation in a music forum is for!!

Puts is also a very good public representative of contemporary music.  The public adores him and he is frequently commissioned by patrons.  Despite his academic skills (he has a doctorate in composition and studied at the finest music conservatories in America), he is tall and athletic and friendly.  Basically, doesn't fit the old loner weirdo stereotypes of what some think a composer would be.  I've been fortunate to hang out with him on occasions including rehearsals of some of his premieres.  We went for a walk after the rehearsal and he had absolutely no ego, was fully curious in my musical experiences and very engaging.  I'm a huge fan of the person as well as the music he creates.  I met him for the first time back in 2002 when he was quite unknown but his music was searing and powerfully moving.  Marin Alsop was a huge fan of his already and he taught at the school I graduated from.  He was quite young (I believe 30 years old back then) and brilliant and I love everything he's written. 
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« Reply #19 on: May 23, 2018, 04:16:02 pm »

Well, if only the basis of the Naxos disc,he has gained a new admirer in me
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« Reply #20 on: June 04, 2018, 08:26:50 pm »

Puts is also a very good public representative of contemporary music.  The public adores him and he is frequently commissioned by patrons.  Despite his academic skills (he has a doctorate in composition and studied at the finest music conservatories in America), he is tall and athletic and friendly.  Basically, doesn't fit the old loner weirdo stereotypes of what some think a composer would be.  I've been fortunate to hang out with him on occasions including rehearsals of some of his premieres.  We went for a walk after the rehearsal and he had absolutely no ego, was fully curious in my musical experiences and very engaging.  I'm a huge fan of the person as well as the music he creates.  I met him for the first time back in 2002 when he was quite unknown but his music was searing and powerfully moving.  Marin Alsop was a huge fan of his already and he taught at the school I graduated from.  He was quite young (I believe 30 years old back then) and brilliant and I love everything he's written. 

Great to read - thanks for sharing. I heard Puts’ Lento assai for string quartet (based on the slow movement of Beethoven’s op. 135) performed live a couple years ago - a very moving work. I see he has written a cello concerto which I’d very much like to hear!
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« Reply #21 on: June 05, 2018, 01:03:05 am »

Puts is also a very good public representative of contemporary music.  The public adores him and he is frequently commissioned by patrons.  Despite his academic skills (he has a doctorate in composition and studied at the finest music conservatories in America), he is tall and athletic and friendly.  Basically, doesn't fit the old loner weirdo stereotypes of what some think a composer would be.  I've been fortunate to hang out with him on occasions including rehearsals of some of his premieres.  We went for a walk after the rehearsal and he had absolutely no ego, was fully curious in my musical experiences and very engaging.  I'm a huge fan of the person as well as the music he creates.  I met him for the first time back in 2002 when he was quite unknown but his music was searing and powerfully moving.  Marin Alsop was a huge fan of his already and he taught at the school I graduated from.  He was quite young (I believe 30 years old back then) and brilliant and I love everything he's written. 

Great to read - thanks for sharing. I heard Puts’ Lento assai for string quartet (based on the slow movement of Beethoven’s op. 135) performed live a couple years ago - a very moving work. I see he has written a cello concerto which I’d very much like to hear!

I really think this very much sums him up:


He understands students need to demonstrate technique but ultimately, your music really has to communicate directly and powerfully...genuinely and without compromise.  There might be a musical trend that everyone else is doing but that might not be true to you and you can't speak with that voice with honesty and authenticity that you will pursue and invest in.  With Puts, he is one of those voices that is very sincere and doesn't follow the trends.  He made me much more comfortable in my own voice just by how authentic he is being and his positive feedback towards my own music was so rewarding.  And the audiences just adore him.  I've heard him at concerts that included multiple living composers and the reception he gets is off the charts positive.  I'm not talking about him now as a famous Pulitzer prize winning composer but 15 years ago when only his music represented him.  Immediately long standing ovations that were very sincere with loads of people waiting to meet him sort of stuff.  He eclipsed the others every time he had a work performed.  On top of that, he is a great guy and without ego.  I wish I studied under him but we're the same age so he was at my uni after I had already graduated.  Now he is faculty at Peabody along with Chris Rouse.  Keep him on your watch list.  I love all he has done.  "Credo" for string quartet is so beautiful. 
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« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2018, 12:30:00 pm »

Thanks for this Smiley The Symphony No.2 is on a Naxos disc so I may investigate further.

It sounds v interesting. I've asked my daughter to get it for me for my b'day.
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