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Mexican Music


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Author Topic: Mexican Music  (Read 668 times)
jowcol
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« on: August 24, 2012, 04:16:54 pm »

Music from the Movie Redes, by Silvestre Reveultas


Mexican National Symphony Orchestra
Francisco Sabina, Conductor
Radio Broadcast, Date Unknown.

From the collection of Karl Miller

Reveultas is a hero of mine (Dudamel has called him the "Latin American Stravinsky").   It isn't nearly as progressive as Sensemaya or La Noche de Las Mayas, but anything by Revueltas is worth having.


From ClassicalArchives.Com
Silvestre Revueltas' music—most of it written during the last decade of his short life—bursts with energy, instrumental color, and mocking humor. Revueltas began violin studies at age eight; the years 1913-16 found him in Mexico City studying composition and violin. From there Revueltas headed north to Texas to study at St. Edward College in Austin (1916-1918) and then to the Chicago Musical College (1918-1920). Revueltas returned to Mexico to give violin recitals in the capital and several states. But Chicago drew him back in 1922 for a four-year course of violin study. In the mid-1920s Revueltas made trips down to Mexico for several series of recitals of modern music; his piano accompanist was the young Carlos Chávez.

Ultimately, Chávez persuaded him to return to Mexico City to teach violin and chamber music at the National Conservatory and to serve as assistant conductor of Chávez's newly formed Orquesta Sinfónica de México, a position he held from 1929-1935. During this time, Revueltas also became active in the cause of artists' and workers' rights.

Between 1931 and 1934, Revueltas wrote six "picture-postcard" pieces for orchestra, ten-minute tone poems usually inspired by Mexican scenes, although when asked what such compositions as Ventanas or Caminos were about, he would say only, "It all depends on the good or bad will of the listener."

After a rupture with Chávez, Revueltas quit the Orquesta Sinfónica de México and, in the spring of 1936, formed the rival and short-lived Orquesta Sinfónica Nacionál. The failure of that ensemble left him free to tour Spain in 1937. He traveled there in his capacity as secretary general of the League of Revolutionary Writers and Artists, supporting the cultural activities of the Loyalist government, directing various concerts and presenting some of his own music. Revueltas returned to Mexico the following year; he took up teaching again, and wrote a half-dozen scores for Mexican films. His first such effort, Redes (Nets), had come in 1935 for a social protest movie set in a poor fishing village. It became his most frequently played score, after the short, hypnotically brutal Sensemayá (1938). Revueltas was hard-living and self-destructive; although he officially succumbed to pneumonia at age 40, the long-term truth is that he drank himself to death. What survives is a decade's worth of arresting, concentrated works of differing character that shares a single, forceful voice.



Wikipedia
Silvestre Revueltas Sánchez (December 31, 1899 – October 5, 1940) was a Mexican composer of classical music, a violinist and a conductor.

Life
He was born in Santiago Papasquiaro in Durango, and studied at the National Conservatory in Mexico City, St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas, and the Chicago College of Music. He gave violin recitals and in 1929 was invited by Carlos Chávez to become assistant conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra of Mexico, a post he held until 1935. He and Chávez did much to promote contemporary Mexican music. It was around this time that Revueltas began to compose in earnest.

He was part of a family of artists, a number of whom were also famous and recognized in Mexico: his brother Fermín (1901–1935) and sister Consuelo (born before 1908, died before 1999) were painters, sister Rosaura (ca. 1909–1996) was an actress and dancer, and younger brother José Revueltas (1914–1976) was a noted writer. His daughter from his second marriage, Eugenia (born November 15, 1934), is an essayist. His nephew Román Revueltas Retes, son of José, is a violinist, journalist, painter and conductor of the Orquesta Sinfónica de Aguascalientes (OSA). His daughter from his first marriage to Jules Klarecy (née Hlavacek), Romano Carmen (later Montoya and Peers), enjoyed a successful career as a dancer, taught ballet and flamenco in New York, and died on November 13, 1995, at age 73, in Athens, Greece. She is survived by three sons, and two kindred creative female heirs in Oceanside, CA.
In 1937 Revueltas went to Spain during the Spanish Civil War, as part of a tour organized by the leftist organization Liga de Escritores y Artistas Revolucionarios (LEAR);[1] upon Francisco Franco's victory, he returned to Mexico. He earned little, and fell into poverty and alcoholism. He died in Mexico City on October 5, 1940, the day his ballet El renacuajo paseador, written four years earlier, was premièred, of pneumonia (complicated by alcoholism), at the age of 40. His remains are kept at the Rotonda de los Hombres Ilustres in Mexico City.

Works
He wrote film music, chamber music, songs, and a number of other works. His best-known work is the film score for La Noche de los Mayas.[2]
He appeared briefly as a bar piano player in the movie ¡Vámonos con Pancho Villa! (Let's Go With Pancho Villa, Mexico, 1935), for which he composed the music. When shooting breaks out in the bar while he is playing "La Cucaracha", he holds up a sign reading "Se suplica no tirarle al pianista" ("Please don't shoot at the piano player").[3]




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« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2012, 04:34:05 pm »

Arturo Márquez - Danzón Nº 2


Gustavo Dudamel and the Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra (of Venezuela)
2007 Proms, Broadcast Recording

This is one of my favorite pieces of Mexican Orchestral music-- it is not very "edgy", but mixes some romanticism and some very jazzy rhythms, and seems to appeal to a very broad cross section of listeners.  Dudamel made a BIG impression at the 2007 Proms with this performance.  My children's former music teacher is Venezuelan (a follower of la Systema) and every year or two arranges a "international youth orchestra symposium" (about 90% Venezuelan), and she insists on conducting this piece every time.  I never tire of it-- or of watching the complete abandon she throws herself into when she conducts the second half of the work-- it's like she is dancing against the sea of sound, and it's one of the few works where I really wish I could be conducting...

Anyway- a little more about Marquez--


Wikipedia Bio

Arturo Márquez (born 20 December 1950) is a Mexican composer of orchestra music who uses musical forms and styles of his native Mexico and incorporates them into his compositions.

Life
Márquez was born in Álamos, Sonora, in 1950 where his interest in music began. Marquez is the first born of nine children of Arturo Marquez and Aurora Marquez Navarro. Marquez was the only one of the nine siblings who became a musician. Marquez's father was a mariachi musician in Mexico and later in Los Angeles and his paternal grandfather was a Mexican folk musician in the northern states of Sonora and Chihuahua. Because of Marquez's father and grandfather, he was exposed to several musical styles in his childhood, particularly Mexican "salon music" which would be the impetus for his later musical repertoire.

In his late childhood the family immigrated to Southern California settling in La Puente, a suburb of Los Angeles. There he attended Fairgrove Junior High school and William Workman High School. In junior high school he began to play the trombone under the direction of Mr. Rossetti, the school's band director, and continued playing in high school. While living in La Puente he started formal studies in music enrolling in violin and trombone lessons. He had started piano studies in Alamos, Sonora and when the family immigrated to the U.S. he continued more extensive piano lessons in the home of Mrs. Eva McGowan, a local piano teacher. He started composing at the age of 16 and then attended the Mexican Music Conservatory where he studied with Federico Ibarra, Joaquín Gutiérrez Heras and Héctor Quintanar. Márquez was then awarded a scholarship by the French government to study composition in Paris with Jacques Casterede. Subsequently, in the U.S., he was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship and obtained a MFA in composition from California Institute of the Arts in Valencia, California. There he studied with Morton Subotnick, Mel Powell, Lucky Mosko, and James Newton.

Although Márquez was already an accomplished composer in Mexico, his music started to reach the international stage with the introduction of his series of Danzones in the early 1990s. The Danzones are based on the music of Cuba and the Veracruz region of Mexico. Danzon no. 2 was included on the program of the Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra conducted by Gustavo Dudamel on their 2007 tour of Europe and the United States. As a result of the strong public response to the orchestra's performance of the piece, Danzon no. 2 has established itself as one of the signature pieces performed by the orchestra. It has also opened the door for the discovery of other pieces by the composer that are increasingly being performed throughout the world and extensively in Latin America. Son a Tamayo for harp, percussion and tape was featured at the 1996 World Harp Congress.

Marquez's music has been performed and recorded worldwide by a variety of chamber ensembles, symphony orchestras and soloists. He has composed numerous scores for film and dance works. He has received commissions and fellowships from among others, the Universidad Metropolitana de Mexico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Festival Cervantino, Festival del Caribe, the World's Fair in Sevilla in 1992, the Rockefeller Foundation and Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes, (CONACULTA). He currently works at the National University of Mexico, Superior School of Music and CENIDIM (National Center of Research, Documentation and Information of Mexican Music). He lives with his family in Mexico City.

Awards

Márquez has been the recipient of several prestigious awards and honors. Marquez was awarded the National Arts and Sciences (Premio Nacional de Artes y Sciences) award of Mexico by practitioner Felipe Calderon on December 14, 2009. In February 2006, he made history when he became the first musician to receive "La Medalla De Oro De Bellas Artes de Mexico" (Gold Medal of Fine Arts of Mexico), one of Mexico's most coveted award for career accomplishments in the fine arts. Other awards have included the Medalla Mozart (awarded by the Austrian embassy), Medalla Dr. Alfonso Ortiz Tirado, California Institute of the Arts Distinguished Alumnus Award, Union de Cronistas de Musica y de Teatro, and many others. In 2000, the German public paid homage to the composer at a concert in his honor in Berlin.

Marquez has also been honored at several musical festivals throughout Latin America where his music has been performed extensively and has obtained a large following. In 2005, the Arturo Marquez International Music Festival was commenced in Caracas, Venezuela in honor of the composer. His Danzones are increasingly being used for ballet productions throughout the world. Although regarded by many as a controversial composer for his use of Latin American styles in his compositions, he is a popular composer among the Latin American public and is widely recognized as one of the most important and admired Mexican composers of his generation.


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« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2012, 09:38:07 pm »

Jowcol, the music by Revueltas which you uploaded is from the 1935 film "Redes". I admit, the announcer is difficult to understand.  Grin
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2012, 06:11:22 pm »

Sensemaya, by Silvestre Revueltas


Performed by: Orquesta Sinfónica de la Juventud Venezolana Simón Bolívar. (Simon Bolivar Youth Orchestra)
Director: Gustavo Dudamel.
Venue: Sala de Conciertos "Simón Bolivar" del Centro de Accion Social por la Música, Caracas
Date: December 31, 2007

Broadcast Recording

As far as I know, not available commercially.

This is a particularly good interpretation of Sensemaya I'm sorry to have missed in person.
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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2012, 07:32:54 pm »

Mr Jowcol - lovely selection of music today from so many nations; thank you !
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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2012, 08:29:10 pm »

Mr Jowcol - lovely selection of music today from so many nations; thank you !
That's the thing about music-- sharing is half the fun!

I must confess that this was the last of the shipment I have received from Karl that has kept me busy all summer .  For the most part, I'll be using my  spare cycles in the next few weeks  to port over my posts from UC--, although have a couple odds and ends of my own I hope to post as well.
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« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2013, 12:38:50 am »

If You like Mexican climax, You can listen to such composers as Jose Pablo Moncayo, maybe also Blas Galindo. "Huapango" by Moncayo and "Sones De Mariachi" de Galindo are more famous, but other orchestral works are also interesting. There is also nice Guitar Concerto by Manuel Maria Ponce. 

Generally, mexican and brazilian composers are probably the most famous from this area (Central and South America). Cuba, Chile, Uruguay and also Argentina also had good composers, but eccept Ginastera, Kagel and Piazzolla the others are quite difficult to find on records and maybe also concert halls outside America.
In Mexico except Revueltas, Carlos Chavez was very important composer. Some consider these two as the greatest mexican composers.
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« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2014, 07:22:42 pm »

Music of Julian Carillo


Today's posting is the work of a Mexican Composer that I now rank with Reveultas-- which is a high compliment from me.  Carillo started out as a fairly traditional late romantic/turn of the century composer, but became one of the first true microtonal composers, creating his own microtonal notation, theory and record label  (Sonido 13), creating works in quarter, eighth , and sixteenth tones, and leading to the creation of new instruments.  From what I've been able to establish, the Sonido 13 LPs are rare, and have never been released digitally.  I have split this into two volumes-- the first is  provided from Karl Miller's collection, and the second is material that I've found that i publicly posted-- albeit with less information.

For what it's worth-- I'm a big fan of composers/musicians that work with microtones and alternate tunings-- there is a sound acoustical and scientific basis there that I don't see in serialism.   But that is my own pet peeve.   Your mileage may vary-- but I find Carillo's later work to be fascinating.

Works:

Volume 1:
From the collection of Karl Miller

Primera Sinfonia
Orquesta  de la Asociación de Conciertos Lamoureux/Composer
Sonido 13  JC-002


Segunda Sinfónica en Do Mayor
Orquesta Sinfonica Lamoureux de Paris/Louis Froment


Tercera Sinfonia Atonal
I–Allegro tempestuoso
II–Lento misterioso
III–Allegretto casi Scherzo
IV–Marcial
Orquesta Sinfonica Lamoureux de Paris/Louis Froment
JC -014


Dos Pequenos cuartetos en cuartos de tono
Meditacion; En secreto
Quarteto Villiers; Francine Villers ; Nicole Lepinte; Marie-Thérèse Chaillet ; Reine Flachot
México Sonido 13 LPL 1703-4

Triple Concerto for Flute, Violin and Cello
Jean-Pierre Rampal, flute; Robert Gendre, violin;
Robert Bex, cello
Lamoureux  Symphony Orchestra
Julian Carrillo, conductor
Sonido 13  LPL 396


String Quartet No.1
String Quartet No.2

French Quartet: Robert Gendre;
J. Geshtem; Serge Collot; Robert Bex
México Sonido 13 LPL  1679-80
 


Volume 2:
Assembled from public sources. Unless otherwise specified, these are likely from the Sonido 13 label, with the la Orquesta de la Asociocion de Conciertos Lamoureux

Horizontes
Poema sinfonico para violin, violoncello y arpa de 1/16 de tono con acompañamiento de Orquesta
Los solistas Gabrielle Devries, Reine Flachot, Monique Rollin y
la Orquesta de la Asociocion de Conciertos Lamoureux
Sonido 13 JC-001


Balbuceos
Para piano de dieciseisavos de tono y orquesta de camara
Solista Bernard de Flavigny y la Orquesta de la Asociacion de Conciertos Lamoureux
Sonido 13 JC-001


Concertino
Violín, cello y guitarra en 4os de tono.
Octavina en 8avos de tono.
Arpa y corno en 16avos de tono y
la Orquesta de la Asociacion de Conciertos Lamoureux



Preludio a Colon
En 1/4, 1/8 y 1/16 de tono
Conjunto instrumental y soprano
Solista: Annik Simon
la Orquesta de la Asociacion de Conciertos Lamoureux
Sonido 13 JC-001


Suite Impromptu para guitarra - Prelude on 24 EDO (Quarter-tones)

Cometa for Microtonal Harp

Cromometrofonía

Primer Concierto para Violonchelo en 4os y 8os de tono

Preludio 1: Illusion
Preludio No.3 Plenilunio en Tepepan
Preludio No.6 Media Noche-Julian Carrillo
Sonata Casi Fantasia


[
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« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2015, 10:43:40 am »

Many thanks for You Jowcol for Your great work and great uploads.

Julian Carrillo is (I hope so) very interesting composer, but his works are not many on youtube chanell. With the other composers, like Revuletas, Chavez, Galindo, Ponce, Moncayo, and Huizar is quite better. So, now we can to know more great mexican music. :-)
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« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2015, 01:25:57 am »

Blas Galindo "Cantata Patria"
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