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Croatian Music


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Author Topic: Croatian Music  (Read 3788 times)
Dundonnell
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« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2013, 01:35:48 am »

I think we owe a huge vote of thanks to ttle for the massive upload of Bersa symphonies Smiley

You mean Bjelinski Grin

Many, many thanks from me as well, Ttle Smiley Smiley Bjelinski's music has long been on my wish-to-hear list. Apparently he composer fifteen symphonies in total!

So many new Downloads Grin  My head is spinning like a top Grin
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Toby Esterhase
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« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2013, 12:58:04 am »

I think we owe a huge vote of thanks to ttle for the massive upload of Bersa symphonies Smiley

You mean Bjelinski Grin

Many, many thanks from me as well, Ttle Smiley Smiley Bjelinski's music has long been on my wish-to-hear list. Apparently he composer fifteen symphonies in total!

So many new Downloads Grin  My head is spinning like a top Grin

Maybe that Bjelinski hasn't been recorded on cd yet?
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kyjo
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« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2013, 01:13:58 am »

It appears that only one work of Bjelinski's has made it to CD: his Clarinet Sonata, which is on this Crystal Records CD:



As has been mentioned earlier, his Cello Concerto no. 1 and Symphony no. 9 are available on mp3 albums from Amazon.

 Smiley
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guest140
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« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2013, 05:06:38 am »

The Concertino di primavera is on a Jecklin CD (Jecklin JS 277-2)
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kyjo
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« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2013, 05:24:39 am »

Thanks for the info, but I cannot seem to find that particular CD. Jecklin CDs are notoriously difficult to get ahold of Roll Eyes

BTW I found some more Bjelinski on YT: his Concerto for clarinet and strings, Divertimento for orchestra, Three Biblical Legends for trombone and piano, a Sinfonietta and part of his Cello Concerto no. 1:

Concerto (I):
Concerto (II):
Concerto (III):  http://youtu.be/TOIs8Rjq9rY
Concerto (IV):
Divertimento:
Biblical Legends:
Sinfonietta:
CC 1 (excerpt):

 Smiley
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Elroel
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« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2013, 09:13:31 am »

The Bjelinki Sinfomietta on YT is not complete. Only part I is there
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kyjo
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« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2013, 10:34:40 pm »

Many thanks, Ttle, for the Sulek Organ Concerto Smiley

Good heavens.....this composer is well-represented in our downloads Grin

....and none the worse for that Smiley
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ttle
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« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2013, 10:40:22 pm »

Yes indeed  Grin
It is a pleasure. Maybe an Art-Music forum lobby can convince Mr. Heymann that Sulek is not such an 'obscure' composer! Cool After all, more or less once a year, one or another of his symphonies is performed in concert by one of the main two Zagreb orchestras, some of his instrumental concertos every once in a while, and then there are the classical concertos, the sonatas, the quartets...
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shamus
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« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2013, 10:04:33 pm »

I would like to add my thanks to ttle for the Sulek organ concerto. I have collected organ concertos all my music-appreciating life and this one is one of the most beautiful and powerful I have heard. My ideal of most heavenly would be a big all-out late romantic or early 20th Century concerto for organ and piano that would give me the shivers all the way through, like the beginning of the last movement of St. Saens Symphony 3 where the organ comes in full, then the piano joins in and they dialogue for the briefest of ecstatic moments. Oh my, let me take a chill pill.   Smiley
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kyjo
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« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2013, 10:17:55 pm »

My ideal of most heavenly would be a big all-out late romantic or early 20th Century concerto for organ and piano that would give me the shivers all the way through, like the beginning of the last movement of St. Saens Symphony 3 where the organ comes in full, then the piano joins in and they dialogue for the briefest of ecstatic moments. Oh my, let me take a chill pill.   Smiley

 Grin Grin

That would be totally awesome (as kids these days would say) Grin

BTW have you heard Petr Eben's huge Concerto gregoriano (Organ Concerto no. 1), which is on an Oehms CD? Epic and Mahlerian don't even begin to describe it Grin
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fr8nks
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« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2013, 10:10:47 pm »

Did anyone else pick up on the quote throughout  the second movement of Sulek's Organ Concerto of the Christmas carol "The First Noel"?
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shamus
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« Reply #26 on: January 27, 2013, 03:07:24 am »

Yes, I heard the First Noel, too, wondered if it meant anything, lovely in any case.
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Latvian
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« Reply #27 on: January 27, 2013, 05:13:34 pm »

Quote
Yes, I heard the First Noel, too, wondered if it meant anything, lovely in any case.

Sulek seems to quote other music in his works quite regularly. I'm sure there must be some significance, but have not read anywhere what it may be. Perhaps ttle can enlighten us?

The last two movements of the 6th Symphony appear to quote a distinctive figure from Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. The 7th Symphony quotes Bruckner. The 8th Symphony quotes Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet. I'm sure other works have quote as well, that are perhaps less obvious.
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #28 on: January 28, 2013, 03:36:27 pm »

I would like to add my thanks to ttle for the Sulek organ concerto.

Sitting in my holiday hotel in N. Cyprus enjoying it now.....because it's raining (better than the snow we left in GB, though !). Lovely, thanks !
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Clive
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« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2013, 09:46:38 pm »

There is also a very clear quote from Bruckner's Seventh in the slow part of the Sixth Symphony. Šulek's use of quotations must have been documented and I shall try to find references discussing them. Here is, however, part of the tribute paid by Stanko Horvat, one of his students and himself a major Croatian composer of his generation (in a relatively traditional vein):
It seems to me worth mentioning that Maestro Šulek attained his skills as a composer almost completely alone, without a teacher to look at, or better to say to many teachers he was choosing by himself, and he chose the greatest ones: Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Wagner,... and remained always faithful to them. The fact that an extraordinary talent looks back at past in his creation deserves special study and consideration. For me, this is a kind of anticipation of phenomena we are witnesses of today, especially in literature and fine arts, anticipation of post-modernistic phenomena and of emergence of authors “with memory”, as they say today. Master Šulek is an author “with memory”, and, as Borges and Eco write about books from past ages, so does Master Šulek speak in his scores about the music of the past. As much as we might have been surprised and puzzled by such an attitude, as we were growing older, having actively participated in the turbulent developments in music, we started to turn more and more to the past, finding beauty, peace, order and human dignity in it, all the things our unsettled age has been depriving us of.
cf. http://wam.hr/sadrzaj/us/Sulek_Horvat.pdf
and another interesting survey by musicologist Eva Sedak:
http://wam.hr/sadrzaj/us/Sulek_Sedak.pdf
(the latter suffering from what seems to be a "classic" distorsion from elaborate Croatian to convoluted English, but still worth reading).
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