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What are you listening to today?


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Author Topic: What are you listening to today?  (Read 7681 times)
dhibbard
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« Reply #270 on: June 29, 2017, 11:57:05 pm »

Later Rimsky. The Golden Cockerel, Tsar Saltan and Christmas Eve suites. Visited his apartment / museum in Saint-Peterburg a few years ago and am now reminded of that world.
http://www.saint-petersburg.com/museums/rimsky-korsakov-memorial-apartment-museum/

Thank you for this link.. very interesting!!  I also read that the Tchaikovsky Foundation has something similar in Moscow.  Apparently, the home he used in dwell in has been in the family since his death, and they turned it into a museum also.  Wonder how that worked under the USSR and then since 1990??  did it revert back to the family or did they purchase the home from the State??
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« Reply #271 on: June 30, 2017, 06:51:51 am »

Later Rimsky. The Golden Cockerel, Tsar Saltan and Christmas Eve suites. Visited his apartment / museum in Saint-Peterburg a few years ago and am now reminded of that world.
http://www.saint-petersburg.com/museums/rimsky-korsakov-memorial-apartment-museum/

Thank you for this link.. very interesting!!  I also read that the Tchaikovsky Foundation has something similar in Moscow.  Apparently, the home he used in dwell in has been in the family since his death, and they turned it into a museum also.  Wonder how that worked under the USSR and then since 1990??  did it revert back to the family or did they purchase the home from the State??

No, it wasn't. If I recall well, his home was in use as a 'kommunalka' (communal apartments) for a whole bunch of families in the early Soviet period, and only much later restored to its former glory, It feels like a time capsule, but it isn't. Somehow the family managed to preserve many of his belongings, and they were all put back in place, so the memorial museum is 'real' enough to feel like one.
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948
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« Reply #272 on: July 05, 2017, 07:13:39 pm »

Today's Cd player is loaded with Langgaard symphonies cycles on the Danacord label....
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dhibbard
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« Reply #273 on: July 07, 2017, 09:56:54 pm »

the new CPO CD of Vladimir Jurovsky (Yurovsky) Sym No 5 (born near Kiev and was a student of Myaskovsky) and Zara Levina's (born in Ukraine and studied under Gliere and Myaskovsky) Piano Concerto on the Capriccio label..  something different for  a Friday !!
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« Reply #274 on: July 08, 2017, 05:09:27 pm »

KUSC 91.5 while Uber driving between passengers...  Most any day...
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shamus
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« Reply #275 on: July 09, 2017, 05:28:31 am »

Aequilibria by Anna Thorvaldsdottir, one of 2017 Rostrum pieces, and one of the better, at least to my taste. Found it archived on Latvian Radio last Wednesday. Earlier caught Ion Dumitrescu's Sinfonietta, off Romanian radio, archived, too on program "Polifonie" which appears at about 1300 their time M-F, just click on the red title and the archive of about a week will come up. Some good Romanian stuff to find there. Another offering there was Liviu Ionescu's "poem Coreografic" and Hilda Jerea's "Suita I din baletul Haiducli". God, I love Romanian music. And a delicate reworking to chamber size of Wagner's "Vorspiel und Liebestod" from Tristan by Reinbert de Leeuw on NPO 4. Wow, back in the 70's I never could have dreamed of the abundance of listening experiences the current times and technologies have brought us. Now I have to die! dandelion...
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #276 on: July 09, 2017, 03:20:22 pm »

Ah, Mr. Shamus - some grounds for research there, thanks !
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Clive
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« Reply #277 on: July 09, 2017, 04:11:00 pm »

Dandelion?  Can't say "d**n"?
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shamus
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« Reply #278 on: July 09, 2017, 04:14:46 pm »

Of course listening to Beamish Pf cto no. 3, wasn't careful reading the upload, see now it is the premiere by St. Paul, apparently no American station ever got around to broadcasting it. Also Charles Wuorinen Pf Cto No. 4, just appeared on YouTube.
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« Reply #279 on: July 09, 2017, 04:50:24 pm »

Yep,got Wuorinen, thanks ! Full-time job keeping up with YT...quite phenomenal resource !

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5IIz2ifWslKie8oqo4EX8A
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO0-BvTg999jFDmnLZaO0Fw

Couple of reasonably recent (I believe !) Channels that people might not have come across.
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Clive
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« Reply #280 on: July 09, 2017, 08:53:12 pm »

If I recall well, his home was in use as a 'kommunalka' (communal apartments) for a whole bunch of families in the early Soviet period

I'm not aware of any House-Museum of Tchaikovsky here in Moscow currently. The House-Museum most often referred to is the Tchaikovsky Estate - which is in Klin, a small town about an hour's drive north of Moscow. There is also a small Tchaikovsky Centre in Moscow - on the Garden Ring (Sadovoe Koltso) near to Barrikadnaya Metro. I don't think it ever belonged to Tchaikovsky during his lifetime, but he did (according to the plaque outside) live there at some periods of his life.  The upper floor (which would have been the servants quarters in the 19th c) has been converted into a rather pleasant concert hall for chamber music, although even small orchestral concerts can be slotted in with care. There are now some exhibition halls about his life on floors 2 and 3, but there are no apartments. Not far away is Chaliapin's House-Museum, which is administered by the same organisation.
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« Reply #281 on: July 10, 2017, 07:28:50 am »

If I recall well, his home was in use as a 'kommunalka' (communal apartments) for a whole bunch of families in the early Soviet period
I'm not aware of any House-Museum of Tchaikovsky here in Moscow currently. The House-Museum most often referred to is the Tchaikovsky Estate - which is in Klin, a small town about an hour's drive north of Moscow. There is also a small Tchaikovsky Centre in Moscow - on the Garden Ring (Sadovoe Koltso) near to Barrikadnaya Metro. I don't think it ever belonged to Tchaikovsky during his lifetime, but he did (according to the plaque outside) live there at some periods of his life.  The upper floor (which would have been the servants quarters in the 19th c) has been converted into a rather pleasant concert hall for chamber music, although even small orchestral concerts can be slotted in with care. There are now some exhibition halls about his life on floors 2 and 3, but there are no apartments. Not far away is Chaliapin's House-Museum, which is administered by the same organisation.
In the Summer of 1995 I visited Votkinsk in Udmurtia, where his family estate had been turned into a house-museum for the composer. I see it still is: http://www.russianmuseums.info/M1819
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… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.  RVW, 1948
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« Reply #282 on: July 11, 2017, 09:59:59 pm »

In the Summer of 1995 I visited Votkinsk in Udmurtia, where his family estate had been turned into a house-museum for the composer. I see it still is: http://www.russianmuseums.info/M1819

Thanks for that!  I had heard (vaguely) that the family's former estate was still in existence in central Russia.
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« Reply #283 on: July 12, 2017, 06:04:12 pm »

today's menu served up is Heinrich von Herzogenberg's Symphonies 1&2 and Han Pfitzner's Symphony and Fantasie  both on the CPO label.  This evening will be Hendrik Andriessen's Vol 1 Symphony no 1  also on the CPO label.  Really appears that CPO is taking the lead in bringing unknown composers to their label.
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« Reply #284 on: July 27, 2017, 09:37:22 am »

I'm just back from an extended road trip. On such occasions, I usually listen to music on my iPod, which is plugged into the car's stereo. I make long playlists for such journeys, but often a long time in advance, so by the time I actually come to listen, I forget which pieces are there. The stereo's display is not much help either, so there is a bit of guessing to be done.

One piece came up which was displayed just as "Symphony No 7". Once it got going, I could recognise the style as George Lloyd, but it is a long time since I heard this work, and was therefore listening to it without even knowing basic things like how many movements it has.

There's a "big tune" that appears in the slow movement, and the listener suspects that this will eventually return triumphant to close the work. It doesn't. Nothing in the first two movements prepares one for the Hell's kitchen that erupts at the start of the third. The slow movement theme does reappear, and calms things down to the extent that the work eventually returns to the calm but eerie mood that opens the work.

One would love to know what was going through the composer's mind. In particular, it would be interesting to know which movement was composed first. For instance, does a composer come up with the theme he wants to end the work on, and then decide it has to appear in a previous movement, or is the first appearance already written before he decides to re-use it in the finale?
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