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Romanian Music


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Author Topic: Romanian Music  (Read 2452 times)
Dundonnell
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« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2013, 04:22:24 am »

Huge thanks for the Wilhelm Georg Berger Symphony No.1 (and for the Jan Kapr Symphony No.5 and the Herman Mulder Symphony No.4) Smiley Smiley
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kyjo
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« Reply #31 on: February 18, 2013, 04:33:18 am »

Huge thanks for the Wilhelm Georg Berger Symphony No.1 (and for the Jan Kapr Symphony No.5 and the Herman Mulder Symphony No.4) Smiley Smiley

Heartily seconded Smiley
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jowcol
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« Reply #32 on: February 19, 2013, 02:20:51 pm »

Aladar Zoltan:  Symphony 2 “Laus Terrae Natalis"

Tiru-Mures Philharmonic Orchestra
Szalman Lorant, Conductor

Source LP:  Electrecord ST ECE 01504 (1971)

From the collection of Karl Miller

I haven't been able to find that much about Aladar in English, although I found this blurb on the website for  a Romanian Unitarian church.

A composer born in our congregation as son of minister Zoltán Sándor – who pointing out the role of music in his family said: “I can underestimate neither the role of my father playing the harmonium and the flute nor that of my sister playing lighter dance music on the piano .The fact that my first composition was a waltz ‘á la Strauss’ (in H-minor ,goodness me!) points to my sister’s influence.” In 1951 he took a degree in teaching music, in 1952 in composing and in 1953 in conducting. Since 1968 until his death in 1978 he had been vice practitioner of the Association of Romanian Composers and director of the State Philharmonics in Marosvásárhely. For his work and his merits he was awarded several prizes : 1966 –Order of Culture IV; 1967 – Enescu Composers’ Award (Romanian Academy) ; Ion Vidu Chorus Award; 1972 – Association of Composers’ Award ( Symphony II) According to Hencz József “ The music of Zoltán Aladár has grown into a huge unfinished symphony. It is our duty to discover the inner harmony of this uncompleted oeuvre… He used to create, work and do his everyday duties, and then he overcame himself and was reborn in the painful magnificence of creation a hundred times, and he laid out his soul and music with the unselfishness of the eternal donator.” A black marble plaque commemorates him on the wall of the parish hall.

Machine Translation from   http://lexikon.kriterion.ro/szavak/5177/



Aladar Zoltan (Homoródszentmárton, 1929. May 31 - 1978th July 9th Mv.) - Composer, music writer, music critic, editor, teacher and folklorist. Szekelykeresztur and secondary education in Cluj, the Brass Samuel graduated High School (1948), followed by Gheorghe Dima Music Academy graduated a music teacher (1951), compositional (1952) and conducting faculty (1953). First, the college intern, then assistant professor (1950-55), 1955-60 * Culture of the associate editor, a music columnist. Since 1954, the Romanian Composers' Association, from 1960 to the Romanian Composers Alliance Account Marosvásárhely secretary from 1968 vice-practitioner of the Association. From 1965 until his death in Tirgu Mures State Philharmonic director. His administration began during the Days of Targu Mures Music concert series.

Subjects studied music, essays, criticism of the way we *, True Word, New Life, * Front, Red Flag, The Week, Muzica Romano said.

Composer's oeuvre, an important place in the vocals, especially in choral music: * Andrew Benko that about four-fifths of choral works of art, which is about four hundred choral cycle. First, also printed cycle Passwords weapon (1951), followed by the Four Hungarian Folksongs (mixed choir, 1952), Niraj Saves folk songs (mixed choir, 1954); Ten madrigals (combined arms * Diósszilágyi Violet poems, 1956), Bird Songs ( kórusszvit, 1958); Fly Song (28 Children's Choir, 1963) Winter Nights (Folk Songs for male choir, 1969) Old Student Songs (Paloczi Horvath Adam collection based, mixed chorus, 1972), Three Szilágysomlyó official folk song (chorus, 1971); Petofi Songs (mixed and male choir, 1973), Three Gheorgheni folk song (chorus, 1976 - these choral works on Bárdos great commended); Week kóruspoéma (combined arms, Kányádi Alexander Gerhard Eike, Majtényi Erik, Ana Blandiana, Marin Sorescu Nina Cassian poems, 1977).

Main vocal symphonic works: Tiny Bird (Suite for Soprano, Tenor and orchestra, 1955; revision Korondi dances and Bird Songs is 1958), the second cantata (Csángó texts and melodies, 1957); Csango Songs (contralto and orchestra, 1958), Stretch your hands (Erik Majtényi poem, 1960), five lyric (Kosztolányi Desi, Arpad Toth, Eugene Dsida, Tennessee, poems of Attila Jozsef, tenor and orchestra, 1963).

Many folk songs in folk orchestra accompaniment leaves: Songs of youth and love (népdalkantáta solos, chorus and orchestra of folk, 1953); bouquet of carnations, marjoram (soprano, tenor folk orchestra, 1964), etc..

Musical stage works in a variety of genres in both child and adult audiences said. He wrote a puppet musical accompaniments (The goat and the three Gidon. 1964; Charlie circus going., 1967) stage musical accompaniments (Méhes George: Szépike and Csúfika., 1954; Lope de Vega: defiance room for love. 1956; Shakespeare: Twelfth Night, or whatever you want . 1963; Anavi Adam: Goat Knight., 1971).

The folksongs accompanied by artists of different folk groups and bands of music and dance scenes employees, and. context of vocal chamber music.

Music and dance scenes: Wheat Wreath (gyermekkórusra, soloists, folk orchestra, 1959) Toys (children's choir, folk orchestra, 1960, revised version Bíborkáné daughter titled 1962) Mate Selection (Dance Suite choir and folk orchestra, 1965), Carnival Nights (musical and dance scene narrator, soloists, choir, folk orchestra, 1969); leánykérők Bihar - Bihar Peţitori din. Hommage ŕ Béla Bartók (1971); Tatrangi Boric (folk chorus, and orchestra, 1973). In his folksong arrangements chosen relatively often vocal and piano (VISTA Three Folk Songs, 1952, two people travel with answers, 1952; later, both plant produced folk orchestra version titled Four Hungarian Folksongs, 1968), respectively. mezzo-sopranos of the piano (three Romanian folk song, 1964), the baritonszólistát folk orchestra accompaniment.

More important symphonic works: Divertimento (String Orchestra and two clarinets, 1952), Overture (1955); Korondi Dances (Suite for orchestra of folk music material of sóvidéki, 1957; revised symphony orchestra, 1960); Festive Overture (1961), I. Symphony (1961), Targu-side dances (Symphonic Suite, 1968), Little Suite (Suita picola is known abroad, 1970), II. Symphony (Laudus natal terrae, 1972), Introduction and Allegro (1977), Rhapsody in Bihar (in memory of Bartók intended; incomplete).

Chamber Music: nonet (1953), Romance (Violin and piano, 1953), Sonata for bassoon and piano (1955) String Quartet (1965); szólóklarinétra Sonata (1977).

Songs: My two women (Ady, 1947); Five lyrical song (Joy scent, last year's love, eternal Anna, Helena, Mysteries, 1963).

Throughout his career he has won several awards: the National Competition III VIT. Award (1953), the acquisition Enescu music awards (Romanian Academy, 1967), the ion Vidura Choir Competition Award (1970), II. Symphony League of Composers Award (1972).

Volume: Faculty Leaders Book (* Szalman Lóránttal Hot and Laszlo, Buk. 1968). Edited publications: Song Collection. Mixed Choral Works, children's, women's and men's choir (ibid., 1958); Înalţă-you cîntec - Get song. Choir Volume two languages (Mv. 1966); Armonia Coral - in line slogans. A selection of choral literature. I Madrigals and canons (p. 1972).

First of Cluj Philharmonic Symphony collaboration, under the baton of Emil Simon * Electrecord record companies (1972), the second to Târgu Mures Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Roland Szalman * also * the Electrecord edition (1979) appeared.

Alias signature: Homoródi Z.; -n.-r.

Dezso Simon: Dialogue with the composer. Z. A * Our journey 1973/10. - * Benko Andrew Z. A legacy. * Pre-1978th July 16th; ibid: Z. A Monograph-pornography. Mv. 1996th
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All download links I have posted are for works, that, to  my knowledge, have never been commercially released in digital form.  Should you find I've been in error, please notify myself or an Administrator.  Please IM me if I've made any errors that require attention, as I may not read replies.
MVS
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« Reply #33 on: February 19, 2013, 04:32:32 pm »

Huge thanks for the Wilhelm Georg Berger Symphony No.1 (and for the Jan Kapr Symphony No.5 and the Herman Mulder Symphony No.4) Smiley Smiley

Heartily seconded Smiley

Why, my pleasure!
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2013, 05:20:51 pm »

Sorry - probably being stupid, as usual; can't see a title for the Boldiszar piece. Someone put me straight, please !
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Clive
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« Reply #35 on: February 23, 2013, 07:41:55 pm »

Sorry - probably being stupid, as usual; can't see a title for the Boldiszar piece. Someone put me straight, please !

It's just "Prelude, Chorale-Fugue and Postlude for Orchestra". This piece was composed in 1969. The composer's name is Boldizsár Csíky, with s and z reversed in Boldizsár, and it seems that actually, Csíky is his family name. Boldizsár, by the way, is nothing but the equivalent of Balthazar. He is of Hungarian descent and is partly even listed as a Hungarian composer (that's probably also the reason for the confusion regarding his name - in Hungary, the family name is put first as far as I know). The reason is that he was born and lives in Târgu Mureș, where a large part of the population is Hungarian though the city belongs to Romania.

It's the same with Aladár Zoltán as I wrote in this topic a few months ago: here, Zoltán is the family name as well, not Aladár.
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christopher
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« Reply #36 on: February 23, 2013, 08:20:15 pm »

Just thought I would give a heads-up to my favourite piece of Romanian music: an unknown piece by a moderately-known composer:

Cello Sonata No. 1 in F minor (Op.26) by Enescu. Esp the first movement, it has a theme that just rolls on and on. Wonderful. Please do write if you enjoy it.

There is quite an interesting "jazzed-up" version of the first movement that is used in the movie The Royal Tenenbaums.  I didn't like the movie, but love the music!  You can hear it here:



The notes say "op.26 Sonata For Cello & Piano In F Minor- Enescu, The Mutato Muzika Orchestra sound track from The Royal Tenenbaums movie an interesting adaptation of Enescu's Sonata for cello and piano in f minor by Mark Mothersbaugh".
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cjvinthechair
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« Reply #37 on: February 24, 2013, 05:15:52 pm »


[/quote]

 (that's probably also the reason for the confusion regarding his name - in Hungary, the family name is put first as far as I know).
It's the same with Aladár Zoltán as I wrote in this topic a few months ago: here, Zoltán is the family name as well, not Aladár.
[/quote]

Certainly true to say the Hungarians, like many of the Orientals, reverse their names - occasionally difficult to know, though, which version you're looking at, & therefore which really is the family name !
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Clive
kyjo
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« Reply #38 on: June 16, 2013, 02:46:11 am »

Many thanks for the recent upload of the Constantinescu Triple Concerto Smiley Smiley
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sensemayya
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« Reply #39 on: June 16, 2013, 02:19:12 pm »

Constantinescu's concertos are splendid, but totally unknown.This was recorded live in Bucharest some 3 weeks ago.There is a legendary recording with Valentin Gheorghiu and his brother Stefan, and Radu Aldulescu,cello.I can't find a trace of this.Concertos for piano trio and orchestra are very rare, thus this concerto should be far better known, let alone that his language is not a challenging one.
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kyjo
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« Reply #40 on: June 16, 2013, 07:44:00 pm »

I totally agree. I own the Olympia disc with his Ballad of the Outlaw for cello and orchestra, Harp Concerto, Concerto for Strings and Byzantine Variations. The compositions on this CD (the Ballad and the Harp Concerto especially) are in an idiom that can be described as a Straussian lushness combined with an Eastern European folksiness. His later works are more neoclassical in style but not at all dry or brittle. It seems that there are finally some reasonably priced copies of the Olympia disc with the Symphony no. 1 and Piano Concerto on Amazon-I'll have to snap one up!
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sensemayya
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« Reply #41 on: September 29, 2013, 10:21:20 pm »

Thank you for the recent Caprice roumain with Sitkovetsky.
Do you have by chance the Symphonie concertante with Capucon from the recent Festival?
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #42 on: September 29, 2013, 10:50:41 pm »



 (that's probably also the reason for the confusion regarding his name - in Hungary, the family name is put first as far as I know).
It's the same with Aladár Zoltán as I wrote in this topic a few months ago: here, Zoltán is the family name as well, not Aladár.
[/quote]

Certainly true to say the Hungarians, like many of the Orientals, reverse their names - occasionally difficult to know, though, which version you're looking at, & therefore which really is the family name !
[/quote]
So forget Kodaly? Zoltan Kodaly? How can this be?
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #43 on: September 30, 2013, 02:31:19 am »

The Symphonies of Wilhelm Georg Berger (1929 - 1993) are very intense, captivating works indeed and a huge thanks to MVS for his posting.
Would like to see more..
On a cautionary note, be certain there are no sharp objects nearby when listening and you have taken your meds, his music is quite dour and turbulent..
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« Reply #44 on: September 30, 2013, 07:16:37 am »

So forget Kodaly? Zoltan Kodaly? How can this be?

Roger,

in case of Hungarian composers well-known in our Western hemisphere, we are used to our way of placing the family name at the back because the sources we are familiar with just do so (CDs, concert programs etc.). However, if you look at Hungarian sources, they are of course also reversing names here. For instance, take a look at the Hungarian wikipedia article about Kodály:
https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kod%C3%A1ly_Zolt%C3%A1n
Thoughout the whole text, he is referred to as "Kodály Zoltán" there! It's just the same with Bartók:
https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bart%C3%B3k_B%C3%A9la
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