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Italian Music


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Author Topic: Italian Music  (Read 3401 times)
Latvian
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« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2013, 05:57:18 pm »

Quote
if you thought that collection  was impressive, I'm sitting on a much larger collection of a much more overlooked American composer that I hope to get to in the next couple of weeks, courtesy of Karl.

Ooooh.....the suspense Grin

Likewise! Any obscure Americana is well worth waiting for!  Smiley
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« Reply #16 on: January 19, 2013, 09:31:05 am »

One tiny correction to a material fault in reply 8: "L'Orfeide" (not "Orfeida").
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« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2013, 04:02:11 pm »

Music of Alfred Casella


From the collection of Karl Miller

Note-- this is the last in my recent installment from Karl, but it should keep you busy for a while.   


******************* VOLUME 1 *******************


1.  Cello Concerto, Op. 58
Gerda Angermann, Cello
North German Radio Symphony Orchestra
Gerhard Sameul, cond.

2-4:  Concerto for Orchestra, Op. 61
Munich Philharmonic
Alfredo Antonini, Cond.

5-7: Concerto for Orchestra, Op 61.  (Another performance)
Teatro la Fenice Orch- Venice
Ettore Gracis, conductor.

8,  A Notte Alta Op. 30
E. Maganetti, Piano
RAI Turin
Mario Rossi, conductor

9.  Nocturne and Tarantella for Orchestra Op. 54

Leo Loscielng, Cello
Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra
Ernst Bour, Cond.
 
10-12:  Concerto for Piano, Strings, Timpani and Percussion, Op. 69
Trio Kogan
RAI Turino
Franco Mannino, Conductor

13-15:  Concerto for Piano Trio and Orchestra, Op . 56
Marta de Conciliis, piano
Giuseppe Prencipe, violin
Willy La Volpe, cello
Scarlatti Orchestra, Naples
Massimo Pradella, conductor.



16: Intro
17: L’adieu a la vie Op.26 bis

RAI Turino
Mina Minetta, Mezzo
Fulvio Vernizzi,  conductor




******************* VOLUME 2 *******************



18: Intro
19:  Sacred Songs for Baritone and Small Orchestra  Op. 67

Ferdinando Lidonni, baritone
RAI Turino
Massimo Pradella, Cond

20-25:  Camera dei Disegni, A ballet for Fulvia, Op 65
RAI Turino
Ettore Gracis, conductor


26-28:  La Donna Serpente, suites Op 50bis, ter
Berlin Radio Orchestra
Harold Byrus, Cond.


29 Intro
30 : Siciliano and Burlesca for Flute and Orch. Op 23 bis

Machiko Takahashi, flute
Orchestra Unknown
Pierre Stoll, conductor

31 Introduction, Chorale, and March for Winds, Op. 57
32: Outro

RAI Rome
Charles Dutoit, conductor

33: Intro
34: introduction, Aria and Toccatta Op. 55

RAI Milano
Nino Sanzogno,  cond.

35:  Intro
36-38: Suite in C Major, Op. 13

RAI Turin
Fulvio Vernizzi

39. Intro
40: War Pages, Op 25bis

RAI Rome
Gianpiero Tavesna, Cond.






******************* VOLUME 3 *******************


41-48:  La giara’, Op. 41b, Suite
Tommaso Frascati, tenor
Orchestra Sinfonica di Roma della RAI
Armando La Rosa Parodi, conductor
April 21, 1964

49-51:  Partita for Piano and Orchestra

Pietro Scarpini, piano
Orchestra Alessandro Scarlatti di Napoli RAI
Massimo Pradella, conductor
Feb. 25, 1967





******************* VOLUME 4 *******************


Note:  The works in this volume are arrangements and treatments of works by other composers.

52-55:  Paganiniana, Divertimento for Orchestra, after music by Niccolo Paganini, Op. 65

Orchestra Sinfonica di Torino della RAI
Bruno Maderna, cond.
Nov. 4, 1961

56.  Franz Schubert: Marcia Militaire D.819(Op 40) No. 3
RAI Milano
Bruno Maderna, cond.
May 11, 1963

57: Irving Berlin: A Russian Lullaby
58: Outro

RAI Rome
Bruno Maderna, cond.
Dec 2, 1957

59: Domenico Scarlatti: Tocatta, bouree and gig
60. Outro

Scarlatti Orchestra of Naples
Gabriele Ferro, conductor

61: Intro
62: Johann Sebastian Bach: Chaconnne S. 1004
San Francisco Orchestra

George Cleve, conductor.



***********************************************************

Tracks are mp3s, 128 or more kps.

Sources are from radio broadcasts or personal recordings.  I am not aware that any of these have been released in digital form.

Background Info:


BBC Profile :
http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/59cf3a7f-0eef-4e11-ae69-a2b75feab47f

Some of his scores are available here:
http://imslp.org/wiki/Category:Casella,_Alfredo


Wikipedia bio

Alfredo Casella (25 July 1883 – 5 March 1947) was an Italian composer, pianist and conductor.
 
Casella was born in Turin; his family included many musicians; his grandfather, a friend of Paganini's, was first cello in the San Carlo Theatre in Lisbon and eventually was soloist in the Royal Chapel in Turin. Alfredo's father Carlo Casella was also a professional cellist, as were Carlo's brothers Cesare and Gioacchino; his mother was a pianist, and gave the boy his first music lessons.

Alfredo entered the Conservatoire de Paris in 1896 to study piano under Louis Diémer and composition under Gabriel Fauré; in these classes, George Enescu and Maurice Ravel were among his fellow students. During his Parisian period, Claude Debussy, Igor Stravinsky, and Manuel de Falla were acquaintances, and he was in contact with Ferruccio Busoni, Gustav Mahler, and Richard Strauss as well.

Casella developed a deep admiration for Debussy's output after hearing Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune in 1898, but pursued a more romantic vein (stemming from Strauss and Mahler) in his own writing of this period, rather than turning to impressionism. His first symphony of 1905 is from this time, and it is with this work that Casella made his debut as a conductor when he led the symphony's premiere in Monte Carlo in 1908.

Back in Italy during World War I, he began teaching piano at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome. From 1927 to 1929, Casella was the principal conductor of the Boston Pops, where he was succeeded by Arthur Fiedler.[1] He was one of the best-known Italian piano virtuosos of his generation, and together with Arturo Bonucci (cello) and Alberto Poltronieri (violin), he formed the Trio Italiano in 1930. This group played to great acclaim in Europe and America. His stature as a pianist and his work with the Trio gave rise to some of his best known compositions, including A Notte Alta, the Sonatina, Nove Pezzi, and the Six Studies, Op. 70, for piano. For the Trio to play on tour, he wrote the Sonata a Tre and the Triple Concerto.

Casella had his biggest success with the ballet La Giara, set to a scenario by Pirandello; other notable works include Italia, the Concerto Romano, Partita and Scarlattiana for Piano and Orchestra, the Violin and Cello Concerti, Paganiniana, and the Concerto for Piano, Strings, Timpani and Percussion. Amongst his chamber works, both Cello Sonatas are played with some frequency, as is the very beautiful late Harp Sonata, and the music for Flute and Piano. Casella also made live-recording player piano music rolls for the Aeolian Duo-Art system, all of which survive today and can be heard. In 1923, together with Gabriele D'Annunzio and Gian Francesco Malipiero from Venice, he founded an association to promote the spread of modern Italian music, the "Corporation of the New Music".

The resurrection of Vivaldi's works in the 20th century is mostly thanks to the efforts of Casella, who in 1939, organised the now historic Vivaldi Week, in which the poet Ezra Pound was also involved. Since then, Vivaldi's compositions have enjoyed almost universal success, and the advent of historically informed performance has catapulted him to stardom once again. In 1947, the Venetian businessman Antonio Fanna founded the Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi, with the composer Malipiero as its artistic director, with the purpose of promoting Vivaldi's music and putting out new editions of his works. Casella's work on behalf of his Italian Baroque musical ancestors put him at the centre of the early 20th Century Neoclassical revival in music, and influenced his own compositions profoundly. His editions of Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven's piano works, alongside with many others, proved extremely influential on the musical taste and performance style of Italian players in the following generations.[2]
Usually the generazione dell'ottanta ("generation of '80"), including Casella himself, Malipiero, Respighi, Pizzetti, and Alfano — all composers born around 1880, the post-Puccini generation — concentrated on writing instrumental works, rather than the operas in which Puccini and his musical forebears had specialised. Members of this generation were the dominant figures in Italian music after Puccini's death in 1924; they had their counterparts in Italian literature and painting. Casella, who was especially passionate about painting, accumulated an important collection of art and sculptures. He was perhaps the most "international" in outlook and stylistic influences of the generazione dell'ottanta, owing at least in part to his early musical training in Paris and the circle in which he lived and worked while there. He died in Rome.

Casella's students included Clotilde Coulombe, Maria Curcio, Francesco Mander, Maurice Ohana, Robin Orr, Primož Ramovš, Nino Rota, Maria Tipo, and Camillo Togni.
Casella was married to Yvonne Müller. Their granddaughter is actress Daria Nicolodi and their great-granddaughter is actress Asia Argento.[3][4]



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« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2013, 11:21:34 pm »

I am speechless Grin Grin

Although I have been vocal on here in criticising Chandos and Naxos for duplicating their recordings of Casella's music I cannot but welcome this absolute treasure-chest of Casella recordings Smiley Smiley
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« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2014, 11:37:31 am »

Music of Victor de Sabata


From the collection of Karl Miller

Tra Fronda e Fronda: from Suite #2
Milan RAI Orchestra
Fulvio Vernizzia


"La Notte di Platon"
Turin RAI Orchestra
Lorin Maazel


Wikipedio Bio:

Victor de Sabata (April 10, 1892 – December 11, 1967) was an Italian conductor and composer. He is widely recognized as one of the most distinguished operatic conductors of the twentieth century,[1] especially for his Verdi, Puccini and Wagner.[2][3] He is also acclaimed for his interpretations of orchestral music. Like his near contemporary Wilhelm Furtwängler, de Sabata regarded composition as more important than conducting but achieved more lasting recognition for his conducting than his compositions. De Sabata has been praised by various authors and critics as a rival to Toscanini for the title of greatest Italian conductor of the twentieth century,[4] and even as "perhaps the greatest conductor in the world".[5]


Early life

De Sabata was born in the city of Trieste, at the time part of Austria-Hungary, but now in Italy. His Roman Catholic father, Amedeo de Sabata, was a professional singing teacher and chorus master, and his mother, Rosita Tedeschi, a talented amateur musician, was Jewish.[6][7] De Sabata began playing the piano at the age of four, and composed a gavotte for that instrument at the age of six.[8] He composed his first work for orchestra at the age of twelve.[9] His formal musical studies began after his family moved to Milan around 1900. In Milan, de Sabata studied at the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory, excelling at piano, violin, theory, composition and conducting, and graduating cum laude in composition, piano and violin. He would remain a virtuoso pianist and violinist up until the end of his life.[10] In 1911 he performed in an orchestra under the baton of Arturo Toscanini who influenced him to become a conductor.[11] De Sabata's first opera, Il macigno, was produced at the opera house of La Scala on March 31, 1917 to a mixed reception.[9][12] It was frequently performed during the next few years.[11]

Conducting career
1918–1929


In 1918 de Sabata was appointed conductor of the Monte Carlo Opera, performing a wide variety of late-19th century and contemporary works. In 1925, he conducted the world premiere of L'enfant et les sortilèges by Ravel. Ravel said that de Sabata was a conductor "the like of which I have never before encountered"[13][14] and wrote him a note the next day saying that "You have given me one of the most complete joys of my career".[15] Ravel also claimed that, within twelve hours of receiving the score to L'enfant, the conductor had memorized it.[16] In 1921, while still conducting opera at Monte Carlo, de Sabata began his career as a symphonic conductor with the Orchestra of the Accademia di Santa Cecilia in Rome. In 1927 he made his U.S. debut with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, substituting for Fritz Reiner in the first eight concerts of the year.[17] He did the same in 1928.[18]

1929–1945
De Sabata conducted the orchestra of La Scala in concert starting in the 1921–1922 season,[19] and conducted opera there from 1929. He became the principal conductor in 1930 in succession to Toscanini.[20] Soon after taking up the post, he resigned because of a disagreement with the orchestra over the poor reception of his composition A Thousand and One Nights.[21][22] Toscanini wrote him a letter in order to persuade him to return, saying that his absence was "damaging to you and the theater".[21] De Sabata did return to La Scala, and continued in the post for over 20 years. However, he did not reply to Toscanini, and the two conductors remained estranged until the 1950s.[22]

During the 1930s, de Sabata conducted widely in Italy and Central Europe. In 1933 he made his first commercial recordings with the Orchestra of the Italian Broadcasting Authority in Turin, including his own composition Juventus.[citation needed] According to Benito Mussolini's son Romano, de Sabata was "a personal friend" of the Italian dictator, and gave "several concerts" at the leader's Villa Torlonia home.[23] De Sabata's friendship with Mussolini became another factor distancing him from his former mentor Toscanini.[24]

In 1936, he appeared with the Vienna State Opera.[11] In 1939, he became only the second conductor from outside the German-speaking world to conduct at the Bayreuth Festspielhaus when he led Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde (Toscanini had been the first, in 1930 and 1931).[25] Among the audience at Bayreuth was the young Sergiu Celibidache who hid in the lavatory overnight in order to surreptitiously attend rehearsals.[15] That same year he made celebrated recordings of Brahms, Wagner and Richard Strauss with the Berlin Philharmonic. He also forged a friendship with the young Herbert von Karajan.[26] It is unclear why de Sabata was allowed to work in Germany by the Nazi regime despite his part-Jewish background.

In the closing stages of the war, de Sabata helped Karajan relocate his family to Italy.[27]

1945–1953

After World War II, de Sabata's career expanded internationally. He was a frequent guest conductor in London, New York and other American cities. In 1946 he recorded with the London Philharmonic Orchestra for the Decca recording company. In 1947 he switched labels to HMV, recording with the Santa Cecilia Orchestra in Rome. These sessions included the premiere recording of Debussy's Jeux. He would go on to make more recordings with the same orchestra in 1948.[citation needed] In 1950 he was temporarily detained at Ellis Island along with several other Europeans under the newly passed McCarran Act (the reason was his work in Italy during Benito Mussolini's Fascist regime).[28] In March 1950 and March 1951 de Sabata conducted the New York Philharmonic in a series of concerts in Carnegie Hall, many of which were preserved from radio transcriptions to form some of the most valuable items in his recorded legacy.[citation needed]

De Sabata's base remained La Scala, Milan, and he had the opportunity to work with two upwardly-mobile sopranos: Renata Tebaldi and Maria Callas. In August 1953 he collaborated with Callas in his only commercial opera recording: Puccini's Tosca for HMV (also featuring Giuseppe Di Stefano and Tito Gobbi along with the La Scala orchestra and chorus). This production is widely regarded as one of the greatest opera recordings of all time.[29][30] One critic has written that de Sabata's success in this Tosca "remains so decisive that had he never recorded another note, his fame would still be assured".[31]

Heart attack and retirement

The Tosca recording was planned to be only the first of a series of recordings in which HMV would set down much of de Sabata's operatic repertoire. However, soon after the sessions he suffered a heart attack so severe that it prompted him to stop performing regularly in public. His decision to stop conducting has also been attributed to "disillusionment".[32] His scheduled December 1953 La Scala performance of Alessandro Scarlatti's Mitridate Eupatore with Callas was replaced at short notice by an acclaimed Cherubini Medea with Leonard Bernstein.[33] He resigned his conducting post at La Scala and was succeeded by his assistant Carlo Maria Giulini. Between 1953 and 1957 he held the administrative position of "Artistic Director" at La Scala. This period was notable for a reconciliation with Toscanini (with whom he had had a cool relationship for twenty years) during a La Scala production of Spontini's La vestale in 1954.[34]

De Sabata conducted only twice more, once in a studio recording of Verdi's Requiem from June 1954 for HMV, and for the last time at Arturo Toscanini's memorial service (conducting the funeral march from Beethoven's Eroica Symphony at La Scala opera house followed by Verdi's Requiem in Milan Cathedral [35]) in 1957. The last decade of his life was devoted to composition, but with few results. Although Walter Legge offered him an opportunity to conduct the Philharmonia Orchestra in 1964 and suggested that he write a completion to Puccini's opera Turandot, neither of these things occurred.[32] He enjoyed solving mathematical problems in his retirement.[36] De Sabata died of heart disease in Santa Margherita Ligure, Liguria, in 1967. At his memorial service, the Orchestra of La Scala performed without a conductor as a mark of respect.[citation needed]

The "Award Victor de Sabata" is named after de Sabata. A prize for young musicians sponsored by the province of Genoa and the region of Liguria, the competition takes place in Santa Margherita.[37]

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« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2014, 11:38:28 am »

Music of Victor de Sabata-- Continued

Conducting style
De Sabata's conducting style combined the fiery temperament, iron control and technical precision of Toscanini with greater spontaneity and attention to orchestral color.[38] He was exceptionally demanding of his players: according to one musician: "Those eyes and ears missed nothing ... the players had been made to work harder than ever before and they knew that, without having been asked to play alone, they had been individually assessed".[39] On the podium he "seemed to be dancing everything from a tarantella to a sabre dance".[40] Norman Lebrecht describes him as "a musician whose mild manners turned to raging fury whenever he took stick in hand".[41] One critic used the phrase "lull and stun" to summarize his technique.[42]

A violinist in the London Philharmonic Orchestra compared de Sabata with Sir Thomas Beecham, saying that while Beecham made the orchestra "red hot", de Sabata made it white hot.[15] Another player described de Sabata's appearance when conducting as "a cross between Julius Caesar and Satan".[39] Double-bass player Robert Meyer, who has played under many leading conductors including Furtwängler, Karajan, Klemperer, Giulini, Walter, Koussevitzky and Stokowski,[43] describes de Sabata as "undoubtedly the finest conductor I have ever encountered".[36] He conducted rehearsals, as well as concerts, from memory.[44]

A musician who played under both Toscanini and de Sabata at La Scala compared them, saying,

    [Toscanini] wasn't like "Dede" – De Sabata: he, too, was a great conductor, but he was changeable. One day he would be fine and would conduct a certain way; the next day he would be full of aches and pains and would conduct a different way. He was always somewhat ill. He, too, would be transformed, once he picked up the baton... and I must admit that Tristan und Isolde made an even bigger impression when De Sabata conducted it than with Toscanini. Toscanini was perfection: upright, even. De Sabata, on the other hand, pushed and pulled the music. Afterwards, when Toscanini had left, De Sabata was the only one who could take his place. Despite his faults, he, too, was a great conductor and a musician of the highest order. Once, in Turandot, he heard a mistake made by the third trombone, and it was discovered to be a printer's error that not even Toscanini had caught.[45]

Conductor Riccardo Chailly reports that de Sabata would have the strings sing along with the trombone glissandi at the climax of Ravel's Boléro, and that Chailly himself asks orchestras to do the same thing.[46]

Criticism
Toscanini did not approve of de Sabata's conducting style or of many of his interpretations: he considered the younger man's gestures to be too flamboyant.[21] Puccini wrote in a letter dating from 1920 that "although [De Sabata] is an excellent musician of the other school – that is, the modern school – he can't, and does not know how to, conduct my music."[47]

Anecdotes of musical abilities
There are several extraordinary anecdotes of Victor de Sabata's musical abilities.

After de Sabata was shown the score for the first time of Elgar's Enigma Variations, the next day he conducted a rehearsal of the work from memory and pointed out several errors in the orchestral parts which no-one, including Elgar himself, had noticed previously.[48]

During a rehearsal of Respighi's Pines of Rome in London, de Sabata "demonstrated the bowing and fingering of the high cello part in the first movement by playing it—without even a glance at the part. The pianist asked for advice about the solo cadenza, which de Sabata also played by heart. In the rehearsal interval, he asked the flicorni for the final movement to play their brass fanfares. They did. 'What are you playing?' he asked. 'It is an octave higher.' 'Can't be done, Maestro.' ... The Maestro borrowed one of their instruments and blew the correct notes in the right octave."[49] (this anecdote is all the more impressive when one knows that the flicorno (saxhorn) is an instrument usually associated with brass bands and very rarely used in a symphony orchestra).

"A visitor [to La Scala] rehearsing Tristan asked Victor de Sabata to take the baton while he tested the sound from the centre of the auditorium. Needless to say, the sound he heard was totally different from the one he produced. De Sabata, without uttering a word, asserted his dominance of the orchestra just by standing there".[50] When Herbert von Karajan was making his own recording of Tosca in 1962, he would often ask his producer John Culshaw to play selections from the de Sabata/Callas recording to him. Culshaw reports that "One exceptionally tricky passage for the conductor is the entry of Tosca in act 3, where Puccini's tempo directions can best be described as elastic. Karajan listened to de Sabata several times over during that passage and then said, 'No, he's right but I can't do that. That's his secret.'"[51]

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« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2014, 06:33:08 pm »

Is there a problem in posting the actual upload links Huh Huh

I only ask because your usual practice is to post the links first then the information follows Smiley
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« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2014, 07:38:11 pm »

Norman Lebrecht describes him

Author of "The Maestro Myth"  Grin
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« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2014, 08:54:53 pm »

There are several extraordinary anecdotes of Victor de Sabata's musical abilities.

After de Sabata was shown the score for the first time of Elgar's Enigma Variations, the next day he conducted a rehearsal of the work from memory and pointed out several errors in the orchestral parts which no-one, including Elgar himself, had noticed previously.
Busoni was also one of the early conductors of this work.
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« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2014, 03:29:59 am »

this might be useful to devotees of Italian music:
http://classical-music-online.net/stat/?person_type=composer&type=country_persons&country=ITA
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« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2014, 05:20:11 pm »

Sorry not to post the Sabata link-- things got frantic the last week.  I'll have it today.
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« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2014, 05:21:01 pm »

Music of Ennio Porrino


From the collection of Karl Miller

If you are a fan of Ottorino Respighi, Howard Hanson, or Samuel Barber, this collection is a must!



These recordings are from personal collections and radio broadcasts.  To the best of my knowledge, none of these have been commercially released in digital form.



**********Volume 1***********

Intro
Notturno e Danza (for small Orchestra, 1936)
Outro

Naples RAI Orchestra/Massimo Pradella

Intro
Preludio in Modo Religioso e Ostinato
Outro

Naples RAI Orchestra/Pietro Argento
Andante calmo
Allegro Agitato

Prosperpina Suite (1937)
Rome Philharmonic/Nino Bonavolonta
Source LP: Phillips S 04571 L

Intro
Sardegna(1933)
Outro

Atlantic Symphony (Halifax)/Nello Segerini

Sinfonietta in D Major(1949)
Rome Philharmonic/Nino Bonavolonta
Source LP: Phillips S 04571 L

La Bambola Malata "The Sick Doll" (1959)
Rome Philharmonic/Nino Bonavolonta
Source LP: Phillips S 04571 L

Intro
Canti di Stagione (1934)

Nicoletta Panni, soprano
Naples RAI/Nino Bonavolonta
Canti di stagione: 4 liriche per soprano e piccola orchestra (20") (Notte d’inverno, versi di G. Carducci; Mattino d’aprile nel bosco, vocalizzo; Afa, versi di Giuseppe Valentini; Autunnale-Ditirambo, dal Bacco in Toscana di Francesco Redi). Roma, 1933-34. Edizioni Carisch, Milano 1936.


**********Volume 2***********

Intro
Nuraghi, 3 (?) Primitive Sardinian Dances
Outro

Naples RAI/Composer

Concerto dell'Argentarola for Guitar and Orchestra (1953)
Mario Gangi, guitar
Saint Cecillia Orchestra/Composer
[17 January 1954]

Intro
Sonar per Musici, Concerto for Strings and Harpsichord

Naples RAI Orchestra/Franco Caracciolo

Intro
Sonata Drammatica

Lea Caraino Silvestri, Piano
Turin RAI Orchestra/ Dante Ullu
Moderato notturno
Allegro violento
Adagio in modo funebre


Concertino for Trumpet and Orchestra
R. Marini, trumpet

Naples RAI/Nino Bonavolonta


**********Volume 3***********

"E un uomo vinse lo spazio" Orotorio Radiofonico (1938)
Turin RAI Orchestra and Chorus
Massimo Pradella
Title has been machine tranaslated as "And a Man Won the Space", and is
dedicated to the memory of Marconi. It was premiered as a part of series of radio broadcasts that run from 1938 to 1942 to promote "new" classical music.
Text by E. Gianinni



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« Reply #27 on: January 26, 2014, 05:23:36 pm »

Music of Ennio Porrino-- Continued

Bio from composer website (Machine Translation, I've bolded works in this collection for emphasis):
(Cagliari, Roma, 1/20/1910/9/25/1959)

Followed classical studies until the age of seventeen, he devoted himself exclusively to composition later under the guidance of the masters Mulé and Dawson, graduating in 1932 in Rome, at the Conservatory of Santa Cecilia. He attended for three years also the advanced course taught by Ottorino Respighi, which soon becomes the favourite pupil. "His master treats your best: the great skill of the colorist, the technique of orchestration, the capacity of adhesion to the substrate harmonic chant. Everything a plan preserving intact the lyrical quality that comes from pure emotions "(Nicola Valley).

Porrino do you know Roman musical environment in 1931, winning a contest for a Newspaper banned from the lyric of Italy with Traccas and in 1933 another difficult contest, that banned from the Accademia di Santa Cecilia for the 25th anniversary of concerts at the Augustan with the Overture for orchestra Tartarin de Tarascon which Bernardino Molinari heads the 30 April of the same year at the Augustan.

In January, ' 34, the same Augusteo and with the same Director, will take place on a more complete statement with the symphonic poem Sardinia, followed by numerous performances in Italy and abroad under the guidance of the most prestigious conductors, such as Patel, Gui, Stokowski. Sardinia is also included, representing the Italian music programmes of the International Festival of Hamburg ' 35. The work represents, as several following compositions, a tribute to the homeland that has left child Porrino and that will directly only later, but continually felt revived in nostalgic memories of his mother.

After composing the songs of slavery for violin, cello and piano (' 33), seasonal carols for soprano and small orchestra (' 34), the vision of Ezekiel, prelude, choral and orchestral adagio (' 35), cantata for reciter, Proserpine female chorus and small orchestra (' 37) and Three Italian songs for small orchestra (' 39), Porrino, commissioned by the Casa Musicale Sonzogno, he for the first time-with the opera Gli Orazi (libretto by Claudio Guastalla)-with what he believed to be the highest art form and complete: the theatre. So Porrino himself expressed about his work: "this job is not melodrama, in the traditional sense and the 19th century Word, but a modern play between the profane oratorio and sporting spectacle: the approximation to the profane oratory is to define the dryness of the musical language, while the parallel with the sporting spectacle stands for dynamism and passion of the story and the music that arise from the contrast of two warring parties". The Obi should be staged at La Scala in Milan in February of ' 41 with a warm success.

Meanwhile Porrino, became Professor of composition at the Conservatory in Rome, he was appointed a member of the Accademia di Santa Cecilia in Rome and the Accademia Luigi Cherubini of Florence.

From The Orazi Porrino, passes to the nostalgic tones and painful atmosphere of songs of exile, a collection of fifteen poems fruit of painful experience of war and of ' exile ' in the city of Venice, where he was transferred, in ' 43, at the Conservatorio Benedetto Marcello.

After the war, and after a period spent in Naples, first as Director of the library of music s. Pietro a Majella, then as Professor of composition at the same Conservatory and as music critic of the Corriere di Napoli, Porrino returned to Rome in ' 47, taking possession of his professor of composition at the Conservatorio di Santa Cecilia in Rome.

     
Meanwhile, his art is enriched with new works: in ' 47 dramatic Sonata, composed a one-act play based on a text by The Banerjee, for reciter and piano; in ' 48, he met the Abbot Ricciotti-author of the life of Jesus-which proposes the idea of creating a musical work of the Gospel which will be accomplished subject the following year under the title Christ and process will run for the first time in April of ' 52 at the Teatro Argentina in Rome. It is a "symphonic-choral fresco which can be regarded as perhaps the most challenging of his substantial symphonic production" (Tito Aprea), a work characterized by the sharpness of the music, drawing from an airy melodic line and a strong rhythmic pulse. "The composer has managed once again to synthesize his thoughts into a work of considerable assumed, well balanced and firmly built" (Renzo Rossellini). "Next to the traditional ecclesiastical style, we have a modern tonal concept involving sometimes strong dissonance" (Felix Karlinger). "The speech flows wide melodic, sometimes invokes the Gregorian chant and it is flourishing richness of melismas. The instrumentation is rich, varied, colorful "(Ceccherini). "Porrino felt highly the drama of Christ and in his every sound element, in addition to being in the service of a faithful musical interpretation of the text, is blended into a unitary conception in which the artist's spirit lifted from technical engagements, sings, from his mystical religious emotion" (Tito Aprea).

After returning for the first time as an adult in Cagliari in ' 37, on the occasion of the III Congress of SNFM Porrino in 1949, looking for a direct contact with the cultural and musical heritage of his island, he for the first time a real journey in Sardinia. The drama of the landscape and its people, the legendary beauty of the coastline and especially the Interior, with its legacy of ancient cultures and beliefs, the inspiration for the three dances of the Earth, water and fire, collected in the composition for orchestra Nuraghi (' 52). Many will be the performances of this work: among the most important are those of Leopold Stokowski and Claudio Abbado.

Inspired by the sea and a rocky islet at the coast of Monte Argentario, Porrino writes, on Commission of the Accademia di Santa Cecilia, the Argentarola concert for guitar and orchestra, which premiered at the Teatro Argentina, Rome, in January ' 54. In the work there is a clear finding "current use" of the instrument, in addition to a sophisticated, fingering the tambora, blocked any measures, stopped, vibrato, the metal, the harmonic, rasqueado and sounds on ' bridge ' and ' hole ', going by the typical Cadence to the twelve-tone series "(Mario Rinaldi), which the composer enters for the first time in his work without sacrificing his own melodic vein.

     
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« Reply #28 on: January 26, 2014, 05:24:24 pm »



The meeting with Giovanni Artieri and his experience as a traveller and journalist in the Philippines bring him back to the Theatre: the sound pathetic, ' swiped ' by a bamboo organ, the theme of an old aragonese jota, a local history of tainted love and political hatred become the matter of inspiration for the single act The bamboo organ, which premiered in Venice in ' 55 in the XVIII International Festival of contemporary music. Among other revivals of the opera include the Teatro dell'Opera di Roma (' 56) and the Gran Teatro del Liceo in Barcelona (' 58).

In November ' Porrino 56 back in Sardinia, Cagliari, as Director of the Conservatory g. Pierluigi da Palestrina and artistic director of the Ente Lirico and the establishment of the concerts and prestigious but daunting task enthusiastically devotes the last three years of his life, giving a strong impetus to the activities and development of the Conservatory (establishes a Chair of Sardinian etnofonia, open a local branch of the AGIMUS) and laying the groundwork for future major projects, such as creating a stable orchestra and a new venue for the Conservatory of music with its Auditorium, other companies will end after his death.

This is also a period of great creative activity: in ' 58 completes the concerto for strings and harpsichord Sonar for musicians and the one-act opera neon Aesculapius; in ' 59, after a long gestation period and subsequent processing, the final draft of the opera in three acts the Sherden.

Sonar to Musicians written for the popular string complex I Musici will come from this run in long tours in Italy and abroad. For the second time, after the Argentarola concert, the composer addresses the twelve-tone technique but "despite the enigmatismo serial music which allows him to flourishes into the realm of melody, Porrino treats his dodecafonici with themes that art and with that hand that have always distinguished" (Nino Bonavolontà).

With neon and Asclepius with his encounter with the poet Luciano Folgore, author of the libretto, Porrino experimenting for the first time the grotesque: "music easy, we would say ' easygoing ' that suits very well to the subject, with predictable rhythms scanned and refrains, with simple accompaniments and proclaimed" (Mario Rinaldi). "It took Ennio Porrino", says Luciano Folgore, "with his talent, his versatility and his desire to score something unusual and irrational, to make up my mind to write an opera libretto on advertising, especially that related to medicinal products. I didn't imagine that medicinal herbs, vitamins, hormones, carotene, cortisone and other drugs like that would have been able to inspire a musician who had always dealt with serious topics and drama ".

And again by serious and tragic argument is the musical drama in three acts the Sherden (men of nuraghi), composed on a libretto of the same Porrino, which is broadcast in 1958, in a radio adaptation, from the Italian Radio under the title Hutalabì, the war cry of the ancient Sardinian peoples. "In the final stage the Shardana were represented for the first time at the Teatro San Carlo in Naples on March 21, 1959, under the direction of the author himself and had a very great success. In addition to spontaneous applause it counted no fewer than twenty of which several calls directed to the only author. The source of inspiration is largely in the Sardinian folksong. But it serves free Porrino, leading to his personal ways of expression. The harmonic structure is generally clear and tone the author reaches complications only exceptionally when the required complexity of dramatic situation. In addition to the frankness of the Sherden inspiration there is the complete domination of the media "(Nino Fara). "The score reveals a strong and skillful hand of strumentatore and orchestral technique reminiscent of hand respighiana and, in some moments, straussian and which delivers effectively especially the choral part. Without doubt the best is the final page: discounted now action, condemned to immobility, the opera stage still manages to keep alive the listener's attention to that page where there is a touched breath and that sums up, in a sense, and more and better than any other, the ancestral soul of Sardinian people "(Fernando l. Long).

The September 15 ' 59 Porrino is in Venice for the premiere of his latest work The sick doll (La Bambola Malata), a pantomime based on a text by Luciano Folgore, inserted in the show plays and Fables for children, designed by Mario Labby for the XXII International Festival of contemporary music. Ten days later, a meteoric stroncava disease just 49 years the life of the composer.

In addition to the works already mentioned, producing Porrino is comprised of various other compositions that touch many different kinds of music: Symphonic, Chamber music (instrumental and vocal), choral and oratoriale. And again: music for dance, film and the soundtrack to the popular television drama Canne al vento (' 58).

     
Parallel to the activity of composer, Porrino played very early to music critic, publicist and lecturer and, after the years ' 50, he began experimenting, in Italy and abroad, including in conducting, first of his own works, then classical symphonic music by various authors.

Often, moreover, he devoted himself to writing poetry and short stories that became texts or librettos for his music.

His publishers include among others: Remember, Sonzogno, Curci, Carisch and Suvini Zerboni, Universal Edition.

By 1980 was entitled to Ennio Porrino, by the Association Amici della Musica di Cagliari, the "Concorso internazionale Ennio Porrino piano".



Wikipedia Bio:

Ennio Porrino (20 January 1910 – 25 September 1959) was an Italian composer and teacher. Amongst his compositions were orchestral works, an oratorio and several operas and ballets. His best known work is the symphonic poem Sardegna, a tribute to his native Sardinia, which premiered in Florence in 1933.
Life and career

Porrino was born in Cagliari and studied at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia in Rome. He later studied with Ottorino Respighi from 1932 to 1935. According to Alfredo Casella, he became one of Respighi's disciples, championing an Italian national music movement and openly opposing composers such as Casella, Dallapiccola, and Malipiero for their Modernist music.[1][2] After Respighi's death in 1936, Porrino and Respighi's widow Elsa completed his unfinished opera Lucrezia for its posthumous premiere at La Scala in 1937.[3]

In the course of his career, Porrino taught at the conservatories of Rome, Venice, and Naples, and in 1956 became the director of the Cagliari Conservatory. That same year he married Malgari Onnis (born 1935), a painter and theatrical designer. She designed the production of Porrino's last work, the opera I Shardana, which premiered on 21 March 1959, six months before his death. The couple had one daughter, Stefania (born 1957), who became a playwright and stage director.[4][3]

Porrino died in Rome in 1959 at the age of 49. The Concorso Internazionale di Pianoforte Ennio Porrino was established in his memory in 1980.[5]



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« Reply #29 on: January 26, 2014, 11:05:51 pm »

Porrino is largely forgotten here however on him:
http://www.studiodelpoggio.it/lostudio/le-opere/l%E2%80%99eclettismo-musicale-di-ennio-porrino-1910-%E2%80%93-1959
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