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United States Music


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Author Topic: United States Music  (Read 25968 times)
cjvinthechair
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« Reply #150 on: June 10, 2014, 08:56:37 am »

There are several lossless formats (WAVE, FLAC, APE are the most used). Anybody can convert a FLAC file in MP3 if one wants to. But the other way around is impossible : I can't regain the information that was lost in the process of conversion in MP3 format.

Well, no, anyone can't actually - I certainly have tried and failed numerous times ! Possible answer, as on some 'blogs' which make downloads available, is to give the option of both 'flac' & 'mp3'.
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Clive
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« Reply #151 on: June 10, 2014, 09:24:30 am »

Well, no, anyone can't actually - I certainly have tried and failed numerous times !

One can convert any audio file to MP3 format using Sound Forge Pro 11. I use this programm to clean up audio files, but it can also be used as a converter. If one wants a freeware programm, there are several of them. A quick search on the Internet finds these : Format Factory, Free Mp3 Wma Converter, MediaCoder, Switch Sound Format Converter, GX::Transcoder.

Possible answer, as on some 'blogs' which make downloads available, is to give the option of both 'flac' & 'mp3'.

This is actually a good solution too. Avaxhome users often do this. Uploading the CD or LP in two formats : one lossy and one lossless. That seems fine to me.
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Latvian
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« Reply #152 on: June 10, 2014, 10:15:02 pm »

There's some misplaced discussion on the Downloads thread -- it should be taking place here, the other is for downloads only.

While lossless formats are undeniably sonically preferable over "lossy" formats such as MP3, I don't believe the intent of this forum was ever to serve as a source for audiophile material. We just share music for each other's enjoyment and edification. There are many, varied, and complex copyright issues beyond the intended scope of this forum that make uploading top quality transfers problematical.

Unless I'm unaware of some history behind the scenes, I don't recall there has ever been a significant complaint about anything uploaded here (or if there was, the material was immediately removed and nothing further occurred). That could very easily change, though, if someone owning the rights to a record label's material found it being publicly freely distributed here in quality transfers.

Offering them in "sample" formats such as MP3 is, for me at least, a perfectly acceptable means of sharing this wonderful material. I appreciate that some listeners are very sensitive to recording quality and are unhappy with anything less than the optimum format. I just don't feel this is realistic in this environment, and don't want to lose this valuable resource due to legal issues.
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shamus
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« Reply #153 on: June 11, 2014, 04:29:05 am »

Yeah, sort of like "think more on what thou hast than on what thou hast not".
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worov
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« Reply #154 on: June 11, 2014, 07:12:42 am »

There's some misplaced discussion on the Downloads thread -- it should be taking place here, the other is for downloads only.

While lossless formats are undeniably sonically preferable over "lossy" formats such as MP3, I don't believe the intent of this forum was ever to serve as a source for audiophile material. We just share music for each other's enjoyment and edification. There are many, varied, and complex copyright issues beyond the intended scope of this forum that make uploading top quality transfers problematical.

Unless I'm unaware of some history behind the scenes, I don't recall there has ever been a significant complaint about anything uploaded here (or if there was, the material was immediately removed and nothing further occurred). That could very easily change, though, if someone owning the rights to a record label's material found it being publicly freely distributed here in quality transfers.

Offering them in "sample" formats such as MP3 is, for me at least, a perfectly acceptable means of sharing this wonderful material. I appreciate that some listeners are very sensitive to recording quality and are unhappy with anything less than the optimum format. I just don't feel this is realistic in this environment, and don't want to lose this valuable resource due to legal issues.


Hi, Latvian.

I apologize if I posted in the wrong thread. I didn't know where to post this. The moderators may move the discussion if they think it's more appropriate some place else.

Thank you for your answer. I perfectly understand legal issues.

Thank you again for the music.
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Gauk
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« Reply #155 on: June 11, 2014, 08:01:41 am »

The advantages of .mp3 are firstly, smaller file sizes, which can be an advantage if you have to pay for space, and also some music players will play .mp3 but not other formats.
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worov
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« Reply #156 on: June 11, 2014, 08:53:29 am »

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The advantages of .mp3 are firstly, smaller file sizes, which can be an advantage if you have to pay for space, and also some music players will play .mp3 but not other formats.

I don't have space problems since I burn the FLAC files on CD's. My CD player never had any problem to read them.
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Latvian
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« Reply #157 on: June 11, 2014, 03:16:49 pm »

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I don't have space problmes since I burn the FLAC files on CD's. My CD player never had any problem to read them.

I used to burn CDs of all the music I downloaded from this forum (and Unsungcomposers), too. However, there was SO much that even this became a space problem. Now I keep all the MP3s on a high-capacity external hard drive, and only burn CDs of the music I think I'll listen to more than once.

I admit it -- I'm a hoarder!  Smiley
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Latvian
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« Reply #158 on: June 11, 2014, 03:20:09 pm »

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Hi, Latvian.

I apologize if I posted in the wrong thread. I didn't where to post this. The moderators may move the discussion if they think it's more appropriate some place else.

Thank you for your answer. I perfectly understand legal issues.

Thank you again for the music.

No problem! As I've mentioned here before, I get excited when I see unread posts in the Downloads folder, hoping there will be new music to explore, and then I'm disappointed when it turns out to be just discussion.

Welcome to the forum! I hope you find interesting music here and are able to contribute some rarities of your own!
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fr8nks
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« Reply #159 on: June 11, 2014, 03:46:42 pm »

I, for one, prefer music in the highest quality format and it adds to my enjoyment of the music. As far as I know there is no violation of owners' rights to an LP or radio broadcast being uploaded in a high quality transfer versus mp3 format. If it is copyrighted material both are illegal. If space on your computer is a consideration, one could always convert a lossless format to an mp3 format before filing it. But once you receive a file in mp3 format you can never recover the losses.
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worov
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« Reply #160 on: June 11, 2014, 06:45:46 pm »

No problem! As I've mentioned here before, I get excited when I see unread posts in the Downloads folder, hoping there will be new music to explore, and then I'm disappointed when it turns out to be just discussion.

Welcome to the forum! I hope you find interesting music here and are able to contribute some rarities of your own!

Thank you. But I'm afraid most of you already know my records. I mostly have standard classical repertoire. I'm slowly getting into obscure composers. I lately discovered Allan Pettersson, a swedish composer. The symphonies are very interesting. But be prepared his stuff can sometimes pretty be violent.

I, for one, prefer music in the highest quality format and it adds to my enjoyment of the music. As far as I know there is no violation of owners' rights to an LP or radio broadcast being uploaded in a high quality transfer versus mp3 format. If it is copyrighted material both are illegal.

That's the law of my country (France) and I think it makes sense. I don't know about the others countries.
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Jolly Roger
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« Reply #161 on: June 12, 2014, 11:20:07 pm »

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I don't have space problmes since I burn the FLAC files on CD's. My CD player never had any problem to read them.

I used to burn CDs of all the music I downloaded from this forum (and Unsungcomposers), too. However, there was SO much that even this became a space problem. Now I keep all the MP3s on a high-capacity external hard drive, and only burn CDs of the music I think I'll listen to more than once.

I admit it -- I'm a hoarder!  Smiley

My approach exactly..and updating the mp3 tag fields allows me to embed the documentation in the file for inventory purposes.
Since I listen mostly on my mp3 player, no need for anything more robust although I do record mp3 live at 256KB.
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Gauk
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« Reply #162 on: June 13, 2014, 09:43:28 am »

It's not so much a matter of space for files you store locally, as the ones held on internet servers.
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Latvian
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« Reply #163 on: June 16, 2014, 01:46:10 pm »

There's a very good rundown on audio copyright law at http://boingboing.net/2013/02/04/vinyl-vault-lights-fuse-on-cop.html.

Interpretation of copyright law can get very tricky and often the legal implications depend greatly on the willingness and aggressiveness of copyright holders in pursuing their right of ownership. When the laws of more than one country are involved, it gets even messier.

The fact is, whether forum participants like it or not, LPs and broadcasts are copyrighted and have ownership. Often, due to the age of the recordings, and successive mergers and acquisitions, ownership becomes murky and difficult to establish. However, the principle remains -- if you didn't write it or perform it, it's not yours to freely disseminate. In some cases, those owners are very tolerant or supportive of wider distribution of their material, as they may not have the means, motivation, or interest in doing so themselves. That's great -- but we don't always know ahead of time who will turn a blind eye and who will not.

Some copyright owners enforce their rights very strictly. Back in the 1990s, a major recorded music dealership got into very deep legal hot water with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, when the BSO learned that it was reselling CDs of historic BSO concert broadcasts on an import label. "Cease and desist" came into play, and I believe they were fortunate enough to avoid monetary damages due to quick cooperation.

While copyright laws are different for print and recorded material, similar principles still apply. I spent many years as a librarian at a Fortune 500 company and saw firsthand what happened when copyright was abused by rampant photocopying, and the full legal weight of a copyright holder came crashing down. You do NOT want to be on the receiving end of that ton of bricks!

I firmly believe we should continue to exercise great caution here, lest questionable activity show up on someone's radar. If this forum became a home for high quality digitalizations, the likelihood will increase that someone will come upon this forum and make trouble. More likely, if someone downloaded high-quality files here, offered them for resale for profit, and then was sued by the copyright holder, that owner would then trace back the source of the files to here.

Bottom line, as I stated before -- I don't want to lose this tremendous resource!
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jowcol
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« Reply #164 on: September 30, 2014, 11:28:12 am »

Music of James Barnes


"I always tell my students that there are two kinds of music. There's the kind that has integrity, and there's the rest.  And it doesn't matter whether it's bluegrass, or whether it is classical or serious music or jazz or whatever. Music with integrity is a rare thing. "
        James Barnes


Collected from various public sources.

This is a collection of music by the composer James Barnes, who specializes in writing for symphonic band.  As you will see form his program notes, and hear in his music, he has a strong grasp of symphonic form, and I would never pidgeonhole him as a "band" composer.  In particular, his Third Symphony is a very powerful and moving work that will conjures up the same sound worlds as Shostakovitch and darker Vaughan-WIlliams.

Look at the download page for the link....


Works: 
1. Invocation and Toccatta
Woodland High School Wind Symphony
University of Alabama Honor Band Festival
February 5, 2011, Moody Concert Hall.
Under the direction of Chris Shumick and John Herndon


2. Symphonic Essay
Tinley Park High School Symphonic Band
Lemont Music Festival
Feb 23, 2013


3. Trail of Tears
Gunn Symphonic Band, 2013

4. Third Symphony
WISH Wind Orchestra (Date, venue not specified)

5. 4th Symphony (Yellowstone Portraits)
Banda de Música Municipal de Valga
Galatian Bands Contest
November, 2008

I: Dawn on the Yellowstone River
II: Pronghorn Scherzo
III: Inspiration Point

6. Scenes from the Aztecs
Bläserphilharmonie Thum aus dem Verein Jugendblasorchester der Stadt Thum, 2013

7. Second Symphony
(NTNU Band, Shu-Han Yeh, May 31, 2006
 I. Elegaica
II. Variazioni Interrotte
III. Finale

8. Fifth Symphony
Performed by AudioImage Wind Ensemble
Conducted by Samuel Lee
Recorded during the Art of Wind Ensemble 2012


9. Pagan Dances
Windband St.David, Voerendaal,The Netherlands during the
National Championships in 2007 in Hilversum,The Netherlands.
Conductor Steven Walker


10.  Danza Sinfonica
Auburn University Symphonic Band
April 17, 2004,
Dr. Johnnie Vinson Conductor


11. Lonely Beach
Round Rock High School Wind Ensemble   
May 23, 2013 at the
RRISD Performing Arts Center.


Works on YouTube

I have been able to find two other "symphonies" of his on YouTube.
His sixth Symphony is here.  I believe this was a reference recording posted by a music company that has gone out of business.  (And the first company to take over its assets is also gone. )






His "Seventh Symphony " the Symphonic Requiem, is a powerful work based on the American Civil War, commisioned for the US Army Band. They have posted a performance link here:



I belive the last movement is commercially avaialble on one of the US Army band's albums.

It goes without saying that, having heard 6 of his seven symphonies, I would like to hear the first if anyone knows where it may be available...

Program Notes:
All by the composer, unless stated otherwise. At the moment, I've been unable to find any for the Invocation and Tocatta, nor the Second Symphony. I've added any personal observations afterwards in italics.


Symphonic Essay
Symphonic Essay has become a staple of the concert band repertoire. It is a dramatic work featuring brass fanfares, tonal pyramids, and startling polyharmonies. The mysterious undertones of the piece are interwoven with moments of lyricism, counterpoint, and a multiplicity of timbres and creative settings that culminate in a spectacular coda.
(Note: I suspect the above was copy written by Barnes for his music company, and not for a specific performance.  I have found out elsewhere that it orginally was commissioned in 2009 by the Troy Colt Symphonic Band. I'll also add that this stands well compared with Barber's Symphonic essays. )

Trail of Tears
Composed in the summer of 1989, TRAIL OF TEARS, is a tone poem for wind band that describes the 150th anniversary of one of the most cruel, unjust and embarrassing official actions in the history of the United States Government. In 1839-39, Federal troops rounded up many members of the “Five Civilized Indian Tribes” who were living in the Southeastern U.S.: the Cherokees, Choctaws, Creeks, Chickasaws and the Seminoles. Despite a landmark decision rendered by the legendary Supreme Court Justice John Marshall stating that the members of these tribes could not be moved off their sovereign lands because of a prior treaty granting them this territory, troops were ordered to move all of these Native Americans by forced march in the dead of winter over 1500 arduous miles to what was then known s “Indian territory”, now the eastern portion of the state of Okalahoma.

On this tragic journey more than 4,000 Native Americans perished from starvation, exhaustion and exposure to the elements. It is an event that will be forever ingrained in the memory of our Native American; a tragic sequence of events inflamed by political pressure the greed of white settlers for more land, an irrational fear of Indians, And downright racial bigotry.

The music with solo flute, intended to recall the bucolic non-aggressive nature of these “Five civilized Tribes”, who simply wished to be left alone and allowed to live in peace on their ancestral hunting grounds. The faster section portrays the strife between the Indians and the encroaching settler and builds to the ultimate tragic battle scenes of 1838, when the U.S. Army used Calvary to defeat the Indians. The dramatic last scene depicts the agony of the march itself and includes the recitation of a mournful poem in the Cherokee language by members of the ensemble.

"Let us mourn those who have died.
 Let us mourn those who are dying.
 Let us mourn those who must endure."


The work concludes with a final statement of triumph for these Native Americans, who survived the Trail of Tears and have managed to live and prosper in spite of all the odds, and who today stand with pride and great honor as an important and integral part of our nation and it’s severely flawed history in the area of Native American affairs.

I wrote this piece because I believe it is imperative that we remain constantly aware that we are just as capable as any other nation of committing crimes against people who are weaker or different form us, regardless of our form of government and no matter what high aspirations we might espouse every year on the Fourth of July. One needs only to recall the interment in concentrationcamps of  the all Japanese- Americans on the west coast and Hawaii duringthose first dark  months of World Ear II to realize that events such as the Trail of Tears are still within the realm of possibility in the “ Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave.” We must continue to acknowledge these highly distasteful episodes on our history on order to insure that drastic over-reactions such as these do not recur in the future of our nation.




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All download links I have posted are for works, that, to  my knowledge, have never been commercially released in digital form.  Should you find I've been in error, please notify myself or an Administrator.  Please IM me if I've made any errors that require attention, as I may not read replies.

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