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United States Music


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« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2012, 05:47:12 pm »

Ben Weber: Piano Concerto, Op 52 (1960)


William Masselos, Piano
NY Philharmonic Orchestra
Leonard Bernstein, conductor
Radio broadcast, March 26, 1961

From the collection of Karl Miller

The article referenced below is quite interesting, and contains two paragraphs that talk about the creation of this piano concerto.

THE STRANGE LIFE OF BEN WEBER - Article by Roger Tréfousse

http://www.composers.com/content/strange-life-ben-weber-roger-tr%C3%A9fousse
« Last Edit: October 01, 2012, 01:44:36 am by the Administration » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2012, 02:03:19 pm »

Four versions of In C by Terry Riley


1.  In C Excerpt
 from Rites of Summer Concert, July 4, 2011
Led by Jed Distler (toy piano), Corey Dargel and Mellissa Hughes (vocals); Peter Flin (accordion); Caleb Burhans (melodica);  Gene Pritsker (electric guitar), and others.

Audio taken from portions posted on YouTube. 

2.  In C Full version
William Patterson University New Music Ensemble
Led by Peter Jarvis
November 30. 2009
Audio taken from portions of video  posted on YouTube by Peter Jarvis, video recorded by David Saperstein.

3-5:  Full version with radio intro and outro from the Small World Podcast. 
Freeform Ensemble, Led by "Bazooka Joe"
http://www.podfeed.net/episode/small+WORLD+Studio+Sessions+Terry+Rileys+In+C/477771

6.  Excerpt (Doom Version)
by the group Orobous is Broken
Free download offered by group.

Score for In C included with download.


I've looked around for some freely available versions of Terry Riley's seminal work "In C", which was arguably the first major work of the "Minimalist" school.  As you all may know, the score (shown above) has 53 small "modules", and may be played by any ensemble with any instruments.  Each play is to repeat a module as many times as they wish, but once they move the the next module, they may not go back.  One musician typically provides a rhythmic pulse of a C octave in 8th notes.  Riley also encouraged sharing of the score.  The result is that no two versions of "In C" are every the same, and each group and ensemble can put its own creative stamp on the work.   My current favorite commercial version is by the group Bang on a Can, but there are so many directions one can go with this work.

Some words about the versions:


From a review of the Rites of Summer concert, July 3 2011, New York Times
2011 review: Summertime Anarchy but of the Guided Kind

Posted on July 4, 2011 by Blair
 By STEVE SMITH
Published: July 3, 2011


What better time to kick off a contemporary-classical concert series? The Rite of Summer music festival, assembled by the pianists Pam Goldberg and Blair McMillen, is relatively modest in its first year: three free concerts in three months. On Saturday afternoon the series got off to a merry start with two performances of “In C,” Terry Riley’s Minimalist milestone from 1964, by roughly 40 players from some of New York’s most industrious new-music ensembles.

In a way you could hardly ask for a piece better suited to celebrating Independence Day. “In C” consists of 53 short musical motifs that can be repeated an arbitrary number of times or sometimes skipped outright. A rendition can last 20 minutes or several hours. In effect Mr. Riley’s work boils liberty, equality and community down to a blissful hippie ideal: If it feels good, do it.

That is not to say that the work is entirely chaotic. One instrument, here a glockenspiel, is assigned to play a steady, ceaseless stream of octave C’s. And with a conductor the piece will often show a coordination and nuance that can otherwise be lost.

During the first performance there was no question that Jed Distler, a pianist, composer and concert organizer, was shaping what was heard by an audience of a few hundred hardy listeners and many more passersby. An old hand at “In C,” Mr. Distler has led previous accounts at the Cornelia Street Café and on the street outside that club. Facing the ensemble at a toy piano he plunked and patted sporadically, Mr. Distler raised a finger to summon conspiratorial hushes, and leapt, arms outspread, to urge climaxes.

No two performances of “In C” are alike, and this one stood out for its vibrant, variegated colors: the voices of Corey Dargel and Mellissa Hughes; Peter Flint’s accordion; Caleb Burhans’s melodica; subtle percussion from a clutch of players. Probably no one had more fun than the guitarist Gene Pritsker, who provided slick wah-wah licks and pinched fuzz-tone riffs, and ran an can't-tell-you along the strings as an impromptu slide to waft Pink Floyd-style space probes into the summer air.


Peter Jarvis

Director of the New Music Series at William Paterson University and the New Jersey Percussion Ensemble, Peter Jarvis is active as a teacher, percussionist, conductor, director, clinician, composer and copyist. He has performed as a soloist, chamber musician and conductor with any number of new music groups in New York, New Jersey, throughout the USA and abroad. Countless pieces have been composed for him and/or his ensemble by composers from all over the world. He has premiered well over 100 pieces and has recorded extensively for, NAXOS, Kotch International, CRI and several other recording labels. His compositions are published by Calabrese Brothers Music.



the Freeform Ensemble perform Terry Riley's In CThis episode is work safe.California composer Terry Riley launched what is now known as the Minimalist movement with his revolutionary classic In C in 1964. This seminal work provided the conception for a form comprised of interlocking repetitive patterns that was to change the course of 20th century music and strongly influence the works of Steve Reich, Philip Glass and John Adams as well as rock groups such as The Who, The Soft Machine, Curved Air, Tangerine Dream and many others.When I first started having bands on my show at WMFO I was heavily into hardcore, punk, industrial, hip hop, anything that was aggro and in your face. But after a few years I got bored with that format and embraced my freeform roots. The live performances I had on my show reflected that change. I started inviting blues or jazz or pop bands to play over the air.At one point I wanted to have a small orchestra perform a piece over the air. But the challenge was what piece could I choose that a bunch of musicians could easily learn that didn't require that they be a virtuoso on their instruments?A friend suggested Terry Riley's In C.Let me explain how In C works so you can appreciate this month's installment of the Small World Studio Sessions.In C is an aleatoric musical piece composed by Terry Riley in 1964. By aleatory we mean music in which some element of the composition is left to chance or some primary element of a composed work's realization is left to the determination of its performers. In the case of In C, the piece can be performed by a group of 35 musicians or smaller. As the title suggests, the piece is in the key of C.From Wikipedia:"In C consists of 53 short, numbered musical phrases; each phrase may be repeated an arbitrary number of times. Each musician has control over which phrase he or she plays: and players are encouraged to play the phrases starting at different times, even if they are playing the same phrase. The performance directions state that the musical ensemble should try to stay within two to three phrases of each other. The phrases must be played in order, although some may be skipped. As detailed in some editions of the score, it is customary for one musician ('traditionally played by a beautiful girl,' Riley notes) to play the note C (in octaves) in repeated eighth notes. This drone functions as a metronome and is referred to as 'The Pulse.'"In C has no set duration; performances can last as little as fifteen minutes or as long as several hours, although Riley indicates 'performances normally average between 45 minutes and an hour and a half.'"The concept of In C was exciting to me and after hearing a recording of In C I decided to form an ensemble to perform the piece.I roamed the streets of Boston and Cambridge for a month, inviting musicians to play In C. Some were friends. Some were friends of friends. Other were street performers. In the end I had gather 15 musicans to perform In C.The next stage was to rehearse In C. Getting that many people together at once is a challenge, particularly with musicians. I decided to break up the ensemble into two groups and had them rehearse at my friend Matt's place, since he had enough room for that many musicians.Finally we were ready.One Saturday night I had everyone meet at WMFO to perform In C in our small recording studio. Getting a band of five musicians in there was a challenge but to have an ensemble of 15 people, plus all their instruments and the microphones, was almost more of a feat then putting the ensemble together.I wanted to be a purist about this performance but I compromised by inviting musicians who played the electric guitar and the keyboard. As long as they staid true to the score I would be happy. Unfortunately, at one point the guitar player decided to improve during the performance. In the end it wasn't a terrible thing and I'm just glad we managed to pull of In C.As I mentioned earlier, a beautiful girl is supposed to function as the metronome for the score. Despite our best efforts, we had forgotten that essential part of In C.Instead of a beautiful girl we had a bearded man act as the metronome. The pulses were played by Michael Bloom, who volunteered to act as the metronome by playing the pulses on his marimba.Michael had rented a station wagon so he could transport his marimba to the station. Then he had to lug it up three flights of stairs into the studio. His marimba was like a large xylophone so having Michael just play the pulse was a waste but someone had to do it. Thank you again, Michael.I was a deejay at WMFO for 17 years and performance of Terry Riley's Thank you again, Michael. is the moment I am proudest of. I'd like to thank Vera Beren for rescuing the performance and transferring it from a DAT cassette to a CD. I'd also like to thank all 15 of the musicians who made the performance if In C possible.



Orobous is Broken


I don't know much about this group, but they are part of the "Doom" genre of rock, which typically emphasize very slow tempo, downtuned electric intstruments, and fairly long songs. (The seminal album in the genre, Sleep's Jerusalem, for example, in a continuous 45 minute suite.) Orobous is Broken has released albums with catchy titles such as Grave Desecration and The Satanic Spear of Destiny. Although I follow some of the current underground rock scene, I can't say I am a big fan of the Doom genre.  I will give Orobous is Broken credit for making an arrangement of "In C", and also sharing it freely.  While I don't think they captured the pulse that Riley had in mind, if they get one person to investigate the work further, I would consider it a success.






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« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2012, 01:50:28 am »

In reply fifteen above, the quotation of M. Tréfousse's text in its entirety has been replaced by a direct link, since the original article is prominently marked "© Copyright 2012 Roger Tréfousse. All rights reserved," and the non-observance of such declarations can easily trigger trouble. For further information about how to handle copyright on reviews and programme notes please read THIS MESSAGE.

With thanks to all members for their understanding.
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« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2012, 04:09:43 pm »

In reply fifteen above, the quotation of M. Tréfousse's text in its entirety has been replaced by a direct link, since the original article is prominently marked "© Copyright 2012 Roger Tréfousse. All rights reserved," and the non-observance of such declarations can easily trigger trouble. For further information about how to handle copyright on reviews and programme notes please read THIS MESSAGE.

With thanks to all members for their understanding.


Thanks very much for the catch, and remedying it!   I'll be applying more caution in the future, but also am grateful to be in a forum where matters like these are a shared concern.
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« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2012, 06:35:39 pm »

Many thanks for the upload of the Stucky Symphony lescamil. Will look forward to listening to it later.
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« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2012, 03:50:31 pm »

Music of Gardner Read #1


This collection of music has  been pulled together  from several private collections and radio broadcasts by Karl Miller , who has also applied a large amount of pitch collection and other restoration.

To the best of my knowledge, none of these recordings are commercially available in any form. 

Karl's Notes:
Most of these recordings come from the collection of Paul Snook. Read was a
guest on Paul’s radio show and Paul got copies of some of Read’s personal
recordings.
 
The performance of the Second Symphony was not broadcast. It was put on disc for
Read.  Other recordings were probably in house as well, but, as you will hear,
the rest of the recordings were either featured in broadcast programs devoted to
the music of Read or from direct broadcasts. This is especially true of the
program with Arthur Cohn that may have featured some performances broadcast only
on that program. You will hear the voice of Paul Snook at the opening of the
Steinberg performance of the Third Symphony.
 
The performance of the First Symphony suffers from substantial cross talk and is
incomplete. From what I can tell, a complete performance can be found at the
Eastman Archives, which houses the Read Archives. They also have two sets of
discs of the Second Symphony.
 
I am trying to convince the NY Phil and the Boston Symphony to get copies of
their respective performances from Eastman. We shall see. The Barbirolli Society
is checking their copy of the First Symphony, to see if it is complete.
 
Pitching of these recordings was difficult. The Fleisher Collection refused to
make available any photocopies of the score for the unpublished Second Symphony.
So much for their devotion to research! The tape I have of the First Symphony
was pitched incorrectly, with the First movement being off by a certain amount
and the other movements being off by differing amounts. Needless to say, this
has taken several weeks to do the restoration and get the performance
information correct.
 
Special thanks to Paul Snook. Also thanks to conductor Peter Bay who caught one
of the side overlaps I missed, and who caught mistakes in the pitching…he had
scores!
 
All are MP3 @ 192 kbps
 
Karl

Contents of the Collection:


Music of Gardner Read #1

 
Symphony No.1, Op.30(incomplete)(1934-36)
1. Lento Mistico-Allegro molto deciso;
2. Largo e molto espressivo;
3. Allegro Vivace;
4. Allegro feroce (portion)
New York Philharmonic/Sir John Barbirolli
[4 November 1937]

Symphony No.2, Op.45 (1940-42)
5. Presto asssai e molto feroce;
6. Adagio;
7. Largamente – Allegro Risoluto e Molto
Energico
(alternate tempi indications)Presto assai e molto feroce; Adagio e molto mesto;
Allegro frenetico.

Boston Symphony Orchestra
Composer, conductor
[27 November 1943]-First performance

8-10 Same source recording with different noise reduction applied
(both from the collection of Paul Snook)
 

 
 
Music of Gardner Read #2
 
1Commentary

Symphony No.3, Op.75 (1946-48)

2. Introduction and Passacaglia;
3. Scherzo;
4. Chorale and Fugue
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
William Steinberg, conductor
[2 March 1962]-First performance

5. Commentary
6-11. The Temptation of St. Anthony, Op.56 (1940-47)
Boston Symphony Orchestra
Composer, conductor
[19 March 1954]
(both from the collection of Paul Snook)

12Commentary
13- 15.  Pennsylvaniana Suite, Op.67 (1946-47)
I. Dunlap's Creek, II. I'm a Beggar, III. John Riley
Pittsburgh Symphony
Loren Maazel, conductor
[12/14 April 1996]
 

Music of Gardner Read #3
 
Symphony No.3, Op.75 (1946-48)
1. Introduction and Passacaglia;
2. Scherzo;
3. Chorale and Fugue
National Gallery Orchestra
Richard Bales, conductor
[27 May 1979]
4. Commentary

5. Commentary (Gardner Read and Arthur Cohn
6. First Overture, Op.58 (1943)
Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra/Guy Fraser Harrison
[13 February 1947]

7.  Commentary
8. Threnody, Op.66 (1946)
George Hambrecht, flute
Eastman Rochester Symphony/Howard Hanson,
[12 May 1949]

9. Commentary
10. Soundpiece for Brass and Percussion, Op.82
Cincinnati Brass Ensemble/Ernest Glover
[15 November 1950]

11/12Commentary

13. Prelude and Toccata, Op.43 (1936-37)
Pittsburgh Symphony/Fritz Reiner
[2 November 1945]
14. Commentary
(from the collection of Edward McMahan)
 
 
Music of Gardner Read #4
 
The Prophet, Op.110
1-12: Prologue: The Coming of the Ship; On Love; On Marriage; On Children 
II O Joy and Sorrow; On Reason and Passion; On Pain 
III On Teaching; On Beauty; On Death;
Epilogue, The Farewell,
Text by Gibran
William Cavness, narr.; Eunice Alberts, Mac Morgan, soloists
Boston University Chorus and Orchestra
Composer, conducting
[23 February 1977]
(from the Pizer collection)
 

Music of Gardner Read #5
 
1. Arioso Elegiaca, Op.91 (1950-51)
Zimbler String Sinfonietta
[8 April 1953]
(from the collection of Bret Johnson]

2Commentary
3. Night Flight, Op.44
Boston Symphony Orchestra
Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor
[16/18 April 1970]

4. Commentary
5. Concerto for Cello and Orchestra, Op.55 (1939-45)
Barry Sills, cello
New Haven Symphony Orchestra/Eric Kunzel
[14 October 1975]-First performance
(from the collection of Paul Snook)
 

 
 
Music of Gardner Read #6
 
1. Prelude and Toccata, Op.43 (1936-37)
National Gallery Orchestra/Richard Bales
[21 March 1976]
2. Commentary

3. Commentary
4. Prelude and Toccata, Op.43 (1936-37)
Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra/Fabien Sevitzky
[7 January 1943]
(from the collection of Fred Fellars)

5 -7.  Pennsylvaniana Suite, Op.67 (1946-47)
I. Dunlap's Creek, II. I'm a Beggar, III. John Riley
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra/Fritz Reiner
[21 November 1947]
(from the collection of Paul Snook)

8.  Dance of the Locomotives, Op.57a
Boston Pops/Arthur Fiedler
[20 May 1978]
(from the collection of Paul Snook)
 

Background Material about Gardner Read


From Wikipedia: 
Gardner Read (January 2, 1913 in Evanston, Illinois – November 10, 2005 in Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts) was an American composer and musical scholar.

His first musical studies were in piano and organ, and he also took lessons in counterpoint and composition at the School of Music at Northwestern University. In 1932 he was awarded a four-year scholarship to the Eastman School of Music, where he studied with Bernard Rogers and Howard Hanson. In the late 1930s he also studied briefly with Ildebrando Pizzetti, Jean Sibelius and Aaron Copland.

After heading the composition departments of the St. Louis Institute of Music, the Kansas City Conservatory of Music and the Cleveland Institute of Music, Read became Composer-in-Residence and Professor of Composition at the School of Music at Boston University. He remained in this post until his retirement in 1978.

His Symphony No. 1, op. 30 (1937, premiered by Sir John Barbirolli) won first prize at the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Society's American Composers' Contest, while his second symphony (op. 45, 1943) won first prize in the Paderewski Fund Competition. Another first prize came in the 1986 National Association of Teachers of Singing Art Song Competition, won by his Nocturnal Visions, op. 145. He wrote one opera, Villon, in 1967.

His book Music Notation: A Manual of Modern Practice is a standard text at most music schools and conservatories in the United States. It is considered by many to be a place of first (and last) authority when trying to determine the proper method of notating musical performance techniques, ideas and gestures.


Bio from the Gardner Read Website:


Biography

Composer, teacher, conductor, and author Gardner Read was born January 2, 1913, in Evanston Illinois. As a high school student, he studied piano and organ privately and took lessons in composition and counterpoint at Northwestern University’s School of Music. During the summers of 1932 and 1933, he studied composition and conducting at the National Music Camp, Interlochen, Michigan, to which he returned in 1940 to teach composition and orchestration.

In 1932, he was awarded a four year scholarship to the Eastman School of Music, where his principal teachers were Bernard Rogers and Howard Hanson. In 1938, on a Cromwell Traveling Fellowship to Europe, he studied with Ildebrando Pizzetti in Rome and briefly with Jan Sibelius in Finland just prior to the outbreak of war in 1939. A 1941 fellowship to the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood enabled him to study with Aaron Copland.

From 1941 to 1948, Read headed the composition departments at the St. Louis Institute of Music, the Kansas City Conservatory of Music, and the Cleveland Institute of Music. In 1948, he was appointed Composer-in-Residence and Professor of Composition at the School of Music, Boston University, retiring as Professor Emeritus in 1978. In 1966, he was a visiting professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Read has held resident fellowships at both the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, and the Huntington Hartford Foundation in California. In 1964, he was awarded an honorary doctorate in music by Doane College. His major awards include first prize in the 1937 New York Philharmonic-Symphony Society’s American Composers Contest for his Symphony No. 1, Op. 30, which was premiered by the orchestra under the baton of Sir John Barbirolli; first prize in the 1943 Paderewski Fund Competition for his Symphony No. 2, Op. 45, given its first performance by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, conducted by the composer; the Eastman School of Music Alumni Achievement Award in 1982; and first prize in the 1986 National Association of Teachers of Singing Art Song Competition for his Nocturnal Visions, Op. 145.

Read was Principal Conductor with the St. Louis Philharmonic Orchestra in 1943 and 1944, and he has been guest conductor with the Boston Symphony, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Kansas City Philharmonic, and various university orchestras in his own works. In 1957 and 1964, he conducted and lectured throughout Mexico on grants from the U. S. State Department.

In 1996, Greenwood Press published Gardner Read: A Bio-Bibliography by Mary Ann Dodd and Jayson Rod Engquist (ISBN 0313293848), which includes an annotated and indexed catalog of Read’s compositions, performances, literary writings, and recorded works, as well as a biography, reviews, and other extensive information about Read’s life and work.

Gardner Read passed away at his home in Manchester by the Sea, Massachusetts, on November 10, 2005.

Interview
There is an transcript of a very informative interview with Read by Bruce Duffie here:
http://www.bruceduffie.com/read3.html



Finally:
I know I've dropped off the radar the last few weeks-- I've had a lot of other projects and commitments keeping me busy, but you should be seeing more posts from me soon enough.

 

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« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2012, 03:50:35 am »

I apologise....this is a lot to take in Grin

Can I assume that the performances of

Symphony No.2
Symphony No.3(Bales)
Threnody
First Overture
Prelude and Toccata(Reiner)
The Prophet

are the same recordings as those previously added to this site Huh

From my catalogue I think that they are Smiley  You may recall that I spent a lot of time cataloguing all of the American music uploaded for UC.....but, of course, that catalogue is now lost to me Angry Angry
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« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2012, 01:51:42 pm »

Thank you, thank you, thank you, for the treasure trove of Gardner Read!
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« Reply #23 on: November 21, 2012, 01:39:31 pm »

I apologise....this is a lot to take in Grin

Can I assume that the performances of

Symphony No.2
Symphony No.3(Bales)
Threnody
First Overture
Prelude and Toccata(Reiner)
The Prophet

are the same recordings as those previously added to this site Huh

From my catalogue I think that they are Smiley  You may recall that I spent a lot of time cataloguing all of the American music uploaded for UC.....but, of course, that catalogue is now lost to me Angry Angry

Colin-  I did not find any postings of any Gardner Read works on this site (or reposting links).  I may have searched wrong. If the links are on UC, I am assuming they don't exist.  (and certainly won't forever...)   

If they have been added here, could you send me a link?   Thanks.
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« Reply #24 on: November 21, 2012, 01:49:02 pm »

Symphonies 4 and 5 by David Van Vactor



1. Symphony No. 5 (1976)
A symphony written for the Bicentennial, and featuring the Vactor family’s roots in the revolutionary war.
Knoxville Symphony Orchestra/ Arpad Joo
World premiere, private recording.

2-4:  Symphony No.4 “Walden”

Maryville College Choir
Knoxville Symphony Orchestra
Premiere, Conducted by Composer, private recording of performance.

From the collection of Karl Miller

Wiki Bio:
David Van Vactor (May 8, 1906 – March 24, 1994) was an American composer of contemporary classical music.

He was born in Plymouth, Indiana, and received Bachelor of Music (1928) and Master of Music (1935) degrees from Northwestern University. He studied with Arne Oldberg, Mark Wessel, Ernst Nolte, Leo Sowerby, Paul Dukas, Franz Schmidt, and Arnold Schoenberg.

He was the assistant conductor of the Chicago Civic Orchestra (1933–34) and was both the flute section leader and assistant conductor the Kansas City Philharmonic Orchestra from 1943 to 1947.[1] He served as the conductor of the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra from 1947 until 1972.[2] He also appeared as guest conductor with the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the London Philharmonic Orchestra, the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, and the orchestras of Rio de Janeiro and Santiago, Chile.[1]

He composed well over one hundred major works, including seven symphonies, nine concertos, five large pieces for chorus and orchestra, many orchestral, chamber and vocal works, and four pieces for symphonic band.[3] In 1938 his Symphony in D won the Second Annual Competition of the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Society for a major symphonic work by a U. S. composer (his former teacher Mark Wessel received the sole Honorable Mention in the same competition).[4] The Symphony was premiered on January 19, 1939 by the Philharmonic-Symphony, conducted by the composer.[5] His music was recorded by the conductor William Strickland.

He was Professor Emeritus of Composition and Flute at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.[3] He taught at the University of Tennessee. His notable students include the "Van Vactor Five":[6] Gilbert Trythall, Richard Trythall,[6] David P. Sartor, Jesse Ayers,[6] and Doug Davis.[7] He died in Los Angeles, California, in 1994.

The David Van Vactor Collection is held by the University of Tennessee Special Collections Library in Knoxville, Tennessee.


Other Resources:

Good history of Vactor  and Knoxville Symphony Orchestra  here:
http://www.knoxvillesymphony.com/our-history/david-van-vactor/

Bio PDF from Roger Rhodes Music:
http://www.rogerrhodesmusic.com/Bio-rev.pdf

Bruce Duffie Interview
http://www.bruceduffie.com/vanvactor.html




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« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2012, 03:43:55 pm »

I apologise....this is a lot to take in Grin

Can I assume that the performances of

Symphony No.2
Symphony No.3(Bales)
Threnody
First Overture
Prelude and Toccata(Reiner)
The Prophet

are the same recordings as those previously added to this site Huh

From my catalogue I think that they are Smiley  You may recall that I spent a lot of time cataloguing all of the American music uploaded for UC.....but, of course, that catalogue is now lost to me Angry Angry

You know, their may be a way to retrieve your catalogs from the UC site and set them up here, so you can continue the great work you've done on them in the past. 

You also may wish to note in the catalog (sorry, yank spelling), that Karl has spent a good time of restoring/re-pitching the recordings, so we may wish to make these the canonical versions.

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All download links I have posted are for works, that, to  my knowledge, have never been commercially released in digital form.  Should you find I've been in error, please notify myself or an Administrator.  Please IM me if I've made any errors that require attention, as I may not read replies.
Dundonnell
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« Reply #26 on: November 21, 2012, 05:58:57 pm »

Ah....I THINK that I now understand Huh

When Sydney said that he had "taken a snapshot" of UC before the "apocalypse" he did not mean to imply that the links to downloads had been moved to this site-with the notable exception of the entire British Music Archive which Albion had backed-up and was able to move in toto.

The links to which he refers are still the same links available on that site. Where a link has disappeared from UC he has been notifying us and requesting re-uploads(which have all-I think-been provided to date Huh). Otherwise members here are being redirected to UC for the link.

Fortunately-for ME- that is Grin I do not need to be so redirected: (1) because I wouldn't get into that site since I am "excluded" even as a "guest" and (2) because I downloaded virtually everything from the site in any case before I was carted off to the scaffold.

So....in the case of the Gardner Read, I had the previous incarnations of the links from UC. If, however, as you say, Karl has improved the sound quality then I shall download the lot again Smiley
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« Reply #27 on: November 21, 2012, 06:12:16 pm »

before I was carted off to the scaffold
Weren't you permitted to march thereto, in true symphonic manner as would have befitted you?(!)...

Speaking of American music and symphonies, how did you get on with Carter's A Symphony of Three Orchestras, by the way?
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« Reply #28 on: November 21, 2012, 06:15:33 pm »

Ah....I THINK that I now understand Huh

When Sydney said that he had "taken a snapshot" of UC before the "apocalypse" he did not mean to imply that the links to downloads had been moved to this site-with the notable exception of the entire British Music Archive which Albion had backed-up and was able to move in toto.

The links to which he refers are still the same links available on that site. Where a link has disappeared from UC he has been notifying us and requesting re-uploads(which have all-I think-been provided to date Huh). Otherwise members here are being redirected to UC for the link.

Fortunately-for ME- that is Grin I do not need to be so redirected: (1) because I wouldn't get into that site since I am "excluded" even as a "guest" and (2) because I downloaded virtually everything from the site in any case before I was carted off to the scaffold.

So....in the case of the Gardner Read, I had the previous incarnations of the links from UC. If, however, as you say, Karl has improved the sound quality then I shall download the lot again Smiley
You're like me,Dundonnell. I have a 'grab-it-while-you-can' policy. I even downloaded the Foulds World Requiem the moment I saw it here. Next minute,for copyright reasons,it was gone! I still haven't listened to it yet & it's safely in my personal vault! It won't get out!
Hope I don't get banned for revealing this?!! Sad
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ahinton
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« Reply #29 on: November 21, 2012, 06:22:40 pm »

I even downloaded the Foulds World Requiem the moment I saw it here. Next minute,for copyright reasons,it was gone! I still haven't listened to it yet & it's safely in my personal vault! It won't get out!

Hope I don't get banned for revealing this?!! Sad
But surely it's out of copyright now anyway?
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