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British and Irish Music


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Author Topic: British and Irish Music  (Read 20991 times)
Dundonnell
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« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2012, 07:09:55 pm »

Many, many thanks to Schuylkill for the uploads of the three works by Iain Hamilton Smiley

There is no point in denying that Hamilton's mid-period music-which includes the Concerto for Orchestra "Commedia" and the Violin Concerto No.2 "Amphion"-is "difficult" Grin

But he was an important, and now totally neglected British composer and it is important to be able to preserve these recordings.

Yes...it is a shame that "The Bermudas" is in dreadful sound quality.....but we are highly unlikely to get another chance to hear this Hamilton Cantata Sad
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Albion
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« Reply #31 on: September 10, 2012, 07:36:01 pm »

Yes indeed, many thanks to Edward for the precious recordings of Iain Hamilton's music - I will add these to the archive.

Besides George Dyson's lovely cantata The Canterbury Pilgrims (added today) I will also record and add the otherwise-unrecorded items from this week's Composer of the Week series on Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875-1912) ...

 Smiley
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A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)
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« Reply #32 on: September 13, 2012, 05:33:39 pm »

Sydney, thanks for the three concertante works by Roger Smalley - not a composer whose music I've heard before. Do you have details of the performers? I think that the PC is probably Rolf Hind with the BBC SSO under Richard Bernas (1994), but have drawn a blank with the other two!

 Huh

I've uploaded six of the Coleridge-Taylor partsongs from the ongoing Composer of the Week series (the last is tomorrow). It would have been nice for the BBC to have undertaken some more substantial things, such as the unrecorded suites of incidental music (especially Nero or Herod), the Solemn Prelude, Scenes from an Everyday Romance or Toussaint L'Ouverture, but beggars can't be choosers, I suppose ...

 Roll Eyes
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A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)
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« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2012, 01:53:31 am »

The performers of Smalley's beautiful and Berg-like Konzertstück for violin and orchestra were Erich Gruenberg (violin) with the B.B.C. Symphony Orchestra led by Maurice Brett and conducted by Nicholas Cleobury.

Both the First Piano Concerto and the Cello Concerto come from Australian broadcasts. It was my usual procedure at the time to remove the talk at the beginning and the end, since the announcers were embarrassingly untrained. But my memory is that the Piano Concerto was played in a public concert by the composer himself with the Western Australian orchestra. I'm sorry I cannot remember who the cellist was.

I do have several more broadcasts of Smalley pieces which could be posted: his Oboe Concerto, Second String Quartet, Trio for clarinet viola and piano, Piano Study 1 ("Gamelan"), Crepuscule for piano quartet, Kaleidoscope for 12 players, and the famous Piano Quintet, which incorporates extensive passages of Chopin. If any one would like to hear any of these please let me know.

And in turn I have a request: I have never heard Smalley's Symphony (composed in 1981). It lasts thirty-one minutes and is presumably a magnum opus. If any one has it in a postable form I would be greatly obliged if it could be made available.
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« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2012, 04:14:41 am »

Really enjoyed the 'Canterbury Pilgrims': I was already familiar with the Hickox recording, but lovely to hear a different interpretation. I assume that this was the original version without 'At the Tabard Inn', which I believe Dyson wrote later. Thanks too for the Coleridge-Taylor. Dare we hope for a recording or broadcast of 'Thelma' one day?
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autoharp
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« Reply #35 on: September 15, 2012, 08:25:15 pm »

I do have several more broadcasts of Smalley pieces which could be posted: his Oboe Concerto, Second String Quartet, Trio for clarinet viola and piano, Piano Study 1 ("Gamelan"), Crepuscule for piano quartet, Kaleidoscope for 12 players, and the famous Piano Quintet, which incorporates extensive passages of Chopin. If any one would like to hear any of these please let me know.

And in turn I have a request: I have never heard Smalley's Symphony (composed in 1981). It lasts thirty-one minutes and is presumably a magnum opus. If any one has it in a postable form I would be greatly obliged if it could be made available.

I, for one, would like to hear more. I think I may know the whereabouts of the symphony and will make some enquiries.
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« Reply #36 on: September 18, 2012, 08:55:16 am »

Maybe this is the right place to announce that I recently learnt about Ian Parrott's death on September 4, 2012. He was 96 years old, and we have two of his works in our archives.
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« Reply #37 on: September 19, 2012, 04:47:07 pm »

Oh, Edward....thank you so much for the Leighton Violin Concerto which, I know, I have been nagging you for Grin
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JimL
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« Reply #38 on: September 20, 2012, 02:31:53 am »

Oh, Edward....thank you so much for the Leighton Violin Concerto which, I know, I have been nagging you for Grin
Do you have any information on the piece?  Movements, etc?
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #39 on: September 20, 2012, 03:10:30 am »

I hope this is enough for you Grin Grin Grin

VIOLIN CONCERTO Opus 12 (1952)
Scoring: 2222/2200/timp/perc/strings
Publisher: Novello

Programme Note
Kenneth Leighton: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 12


Allegro con brio (Molto ritmico)
Intermezzo: Moderato con moto
Scherzo: Allegro molto e nervoso
Epilogo: Lento sostenuto ed intenso

The Violin Concerto, first performed in May 1953 in the Third Programme by Frederick Grinke with the St. Cecilia Orchestra under Trevor Harvey, dates from the Spring of 1952. It was written in Italy, under strong emotional compulsion, in the space of three weeks, and is prefixed by some verses of Ada Negri which can be roughly translated 'Today I seek you, and do not find you; you are neither in me nor near me, nor do I know what fault I have committed that you have punished me in the light of your presence'. While reflecting the spirit of the whole work (whose themes - particularly in their 'soaring' upward movement and the significance of moves of a semitone - are interrelated in the four movements), the verses throw particular light on the concluding slow Epilogue, which is the emotional climax of the concerto. The work is a true concerto in the demands it makes on the soloist, yet at the same time it avoids all empty display. The solo part contains little, if anything, that is not thematic, and with much cunning interplay between violinist and orchestra the whole strongly felt argument is expressed with a conciseness and authority that augur extremely well for this composer's future.

The urgent, uprising theme which opens the Allegro con brio at once creates a mood of restless striving. The slightly less busy second subject (announced by the solo violin espressivo and piano) uses all twelve semitones of the chromatic scale as if it were a Schonbergian note-series, but the composer has emphatically stated that this was pure coincidence, that he is note a 'twelve-note' composer, and that all the themes in the work were entirely spontaneous and uncalculated. The cadenza comes as the climax of the development section; the orchestra takes up the soloist's final trills, with arresting effect, by way of a lead back into the recapitulation, in which section the second subject claims attention before the first. Tension is slightly relaxed in the following Intermezzo, though its leading theme (again of strongly marked musical personality) maintains the striving upward movement characteristic of the whole work as it climbs a note higher in each of its opening bars. There is a strong kinship between this theme and the two episodes with which it alternates. The third movement is a Scherzo and Trio, in which the word nervoso qualifying the Allegro molto is the best clue to the kind of highly strung brilliance required in the Scherzo, while the ironico written above the jaunty Trio leaves no doubt as to the composer's mood here. The deeply expressive final Epilogue has the strongest thematic links with the material of the opening movement, and by means of eloquent cantilena from the soloist, solemnly reiterated drum strokes and much sympathetic support from the whole orchestra, rises from a brooding start to an impassioned climax of yearning before sinking into final despair.
© Kenneth Leighton



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t-p
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« Reply #40 on: September 29, 2012, 06:24:49 pm »

Thank you for sharing your Malcolm Arnold Brass Quintet. I am listening to it now.
It goes down well.
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Albion
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« Reply #41 on: September 30, 2012, 11:22:03 am »

The recent broadcast premiere of A Manchester Overture (1989) by Anthony Burgess (1917-1993) is now in the archive.

 Smiley
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A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)
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« Reply #42 on: September 30, 2012, 10:44:34 pm »

Bryan Kelly: Symphony
Ulster Orchestra; Leader - Maurice Kavanagh; Conductor ?

http://www.mediafire.com/download.php?vki4rk7d3e3vih7
(mp3, 217kbps) Somewhat weak left-hand channel

Sound and Music mentions one recording of this symphony by the Ulster Orchestra conducted by Yannis Daras.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #43 on: October 05, 2012, 04:16:03 am »

Bryan Kelly Huh Huh

A completely new name to me.....a what a fine Symphony Smiley Smiley

Why have we not heard more of him Huh Huh
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Albion
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« Reply #44 on: October 05, 2012, 09:19:31 am »

Bryan Kelly (b.1934) studied at the Royal College of Music with Gordon Jacob and Herbert Howells between 1951 and 1955, and later in Paris with Nadia Boulanger. He later taught at both the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and the Royal College of Music (1963-1984).

There is a serious error in Grove's current work-list which includes a solitary Symphony and dates it to 1988. In fact, Kelly wrote two Symphonies (1983 and 1986) and it is the first which has recently been uploaded. I have added broadcast dates and performer details for this and other recent contributions (including the very welcome Edward German broadcasts) to the catalogue.

 Smiley
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A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

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