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Russian and Soviet Music


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Author Topic: Russian and Soviet Music  (Read 9538 times)
Tartini
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« Reply #30 on: September 17, 2012, 01:21:39 pm »

There is one, maybe hard to find CD: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Shchedrin-Orchestral-Choral-Rodion-Konstantinovich/dp/B000023ZSA/ref=sr_1_16?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1347884358&sr=1-16
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MVS
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« Reply #31 on: September 24, 2012, 09:34:04 pm »

Re:  Arthur Lourie

I was really looking forward to the broadcast of the Lourie Symphony, but it turned out to be a somewhat of a disappointment.  The local FM station at the time used such  heavy-handed compression, that really, there is no difference between the loud and soft passages dynamically - and they were plagued with hiss on some of their broadcasts. ( I suppose with a little work that could be improved.) It blunts the effect of the performance which I don't find as affecting as the Vis performance anyway.  I miss the trumpet clams!  Grin
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« Reply #32 on: October 03, 2012, 09:25:02 am »

I haven't heard  Rakov's name in ages. I knew him (not personally of course) and his music was played somewhat. At least his name was known by teachers and students. I looked for him on the youtube (my favourite place):



Our teachers liked us to play concert studies (whatever they were called). I don't  remember playing Rakov, but it sounds typical of that period. He was a really neglected composer.

Thank you for the information and for thread. It is like going back memory lanes for me.
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« Reply #33 on: October 03, 2012, 09:36:22 am »

This thread sent me into far away places in my memory. Peiko was a known composer. I think I  probably played his music.

I found this violin and piano phantasy on youtube and there are many other things available.



It is strange to listen to this music after so many years and changes. A lot of it sounds good and interesting to me at the moment. Thanks once again for reminding me about Soviet composers.

I have someone here who can play balalaika.  There are people who can play dombra too.  They are a big help to their children who are learning piano (too bad they don't know bass clef).

I just remembered Myaskovsky... There is some interest in him now. He was amazing figure of course and great composer really. There is a new book coming out written by Zuk. He is from Cork and very good pianist too, studied in Cork and Durham and maybe in Moscow and St. Petersburg.

Here is information on Patrick Zuk. http://www.dur.ac.uk/music/staff/?id=4460 I don't know when his book is going to come out but am told that it is very significant book with much information unavailable or not known before. Myaskovsky was in the centre of musical life in Moscow for a very long time and friends with many interesting and significant people of that period. I am waiting for the book too.
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #34 on: October 03, 2012, 11:11:00 am »

Great to see you back posting with us, t-p   Smiley
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« Reply #35 on: October 04, 2012, 09:11:13 am »

Great to be back! This thread made me go back into my memory and also to start looking what happened to some of the composers we used to play. Also one learns a lot by listening and watching how people play. For me it is especially interesting to hear string and other instrumentalists play (and also singers of course).

Also it puts me back in contact with my school so to say (I  do have many influences in my musical development and I did leave Russia rather early). There was an interesting article in the International Piano magazine, called 'Teaching at the top'. There was an interesting panel of pianists discussing different schools and they represented many different schools if I may say so. Now days people of different nationalities are teaching all over the  world and it is pointless to talk about pure schools etc. Never the less one can see and hear differences sometimes.

I was also listening to this Peiko piano Quintet:



Here are some highlights from the article - Hong Kong is a highly commercial society, and many of the students seem to approach piano-playing in the same way, as if they were buying stocks  (Li MIng-Quang).

I have young kids playing repertoire that in my generation very few people could ever master .Eleven-year-olds playing Feux follets in a way that once only Ashkenazy and Berman and Richter could play it (Alexander Barginsky).

If I have to send a student to study abroad, I'd rather send them to Hong Kong than to Moscow . I remember a young pianist from Hong Kong who played Scriabin for me. hers was playing in the old Russian tradition. (Braginsky).

A Peiko symphony is available on youtube (I think it is number one).  It was interesting to hear the Prokofieff and Shostakovich influences there (and how one can combine both).
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Caostotale
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« Reply #36 on: October 23, 2012, 06:28:10 am »

Thank you Sicmu for the Georgi Nyaga symphony. It's not that common to run across Moldovan music of any kind. Here's a stitch of biographical detail:

Born in Bucharest, Romania, the son of composer Stefan Nyaga (1900-1951). He studied violin at the Moscow Conservatory and composition with Leonid Gurov at the Kishinev (now Chisinau) Conservatory, remaining at the latter school as a teacher and administrator. His catalogue covers varied genres from opera to solo instrumental pieces. He wrote 2 other Symphonies, Nos. 1 (1957) and 3 (1983) as well as a Chamber Symphony for Solo Violin, Violins, Piano, Clarinet and Soprano (1982).

A works list is available at:
http://russiancomposers.org.uk/page903.html

A search through Worldcat suggests that his compositions featuring violin were pretty well-received. Aside from that, there's not much info to be found.
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« Reply #37 on: October 23, 2012, 01:27:33 pm »

Thank you Sicmu from me too. I enjoyed Nyaga symphony very much.
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ttle
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« Reply #38 on: October 23, 2012, 10:07:34 pm »

Thank you Sicmu for the Georgi Nyaga symphony. It's not that common to run across Moldovan music of any kind. Here's a stitch of biographical detail:

Born in Bucharest, Romania, the son of composer Stefan Nyaga (1900-1951). He studied violin at the Moscow Conservatory and composition with Leonid Gurov at the Kishinev (now Chisinau) Conservatory, remaining at the latter school as a teacher and administrator. His catalogue covers varied genres from opera to solo instrumental pieces. He wrote 2 other Symphonies, Nos. 1 (1957) and 3 (1983) as well as a Chamber Symphony for Solo Violin, Violins, Piano, Clarinet and Soprano (1982).

A works list is available at:
http://russiancomposers.org.uk/page903.html

A search through Worldcat suggests that his compositions featuring violin were pretty well-received. Aside from that, there's not much info to be found.

Gheorghe Neaga ("Georgi Nyaga" is the standard reverse transliteration of the Russian transliteration...) passed away in 2003 in the USA. I recently found the score of his sonata for violin and piano in London, and shall let you know what I think once I have sight-read through it.
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« Reply #39 on: October 23, 2012, 10:15:15 pm »

I forgot to add that the conductor's full name is Timofei Gurtovoi (conducting the Orchestra simfonică a Filarmonica de Stat din Moldova).
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« Reply #40 on: October 23, 2012, 10:58:51 pm »

Hi guys,

Let me join the chorus to hail Sicmu for this Neaga symphony.
And yes, I realised for the first time that Neaga is a Moldavian and they speak Romanian there. So we should use the Neaga.


Elroel
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« Reply #41 on: October 24, 2012, 10:22:30 am »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moldovan_language

It is probably safe to use Romanian spelling, but it is anyone's guess if his name will  remain with the same spelling. But for now it is ok I think. His name could have metamorphoses similar to Karakaraev. It is vagaries of history if you know what I mean.  Wink
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Caostotale
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« Reply #42 on: October 24, 2012, 03:35:03 pm »

I tend to go with whatever spelling most of their work is published under, so as to ease peoples' pains should they decide to seek out their works. This is probably a bit Russo-centric, but has always made things easier for me.
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Elroel
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« Reply #43 on: October 24, 2012, 04:17:29 pm »

Of course it is sometimes/most of the time (?) easier to use the "old" names. But they are all formed by transliteration to Russian and  from there to English, or whatever other language.
I feel, now that there are several independant countries, we should use the new forms, especially in the cases where the languages are written in Latin letters. Should the Moldavians  release a new cd, they  would use their way of writing the names, in case of Nyaga as Neaga.
We already found recordings from Armenian and Georgian composers in their 'non-russian' form. (Spendyarov is now Spendiarian, to name only one).
We'll see that in the near future more changing of names happen. F.i. the Ukrainian way of transliteration rules are different to the Russian methode.
But than again, it's no big issue.

Elroel

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Sicmu
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« Reply #44 on: October 24, 2012, 04:20:39 pm »

I added the date of Nyaga's death to my post, to my knowledge besides his second symphony, Melodiya only recorded a Poem for orchestra and a string quartet by this very obscure composer. I only have his symphony and it shows once again that DSCH's influence was very strong among the composers of the soviet union.
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