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Russian and Soviet Music


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Author Topic: Russian and Soviet Music  (Read 10598 times)
dhibbard
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« Reply #195 on: July 15, 2018, 04:49:00 pm »

Thanks !!
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Hattoff
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« Reply #196 on: July 16, 2018, 08:06:14 am »

That's brilliant. Many Thanks.
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Dundonnell
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« Reply #197 on: July 16, 2018, 06:47:40 pm »

As an administrator of this forum I would like to commend members who take the time to thank others for their contributions in this way

I sometimes forget to do this myself but I also know how gratifying it is to know that others appreciate a post or an upload
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Latvian
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« Reply #198 on: December 22, 2018, 12:03:49 pm »

In the Russian/Soviet downloads folder:

Alexander Goedicke (1877-1957)
Symphony No. 3 in C minor, Op. 30 (1922)
      Adagio -- Allegro moderato
      Andante cantabile
      Allegro
   Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra
   Boris Khaikin, conductor

from LP: Melodiya D-04786/87 (released 1958, never reissued on CD to the best of my knowledge)

A sprawling, conservative symphony in the grand Russian tradition, not overtly nationalistic, from the early years of the Soviet Union.
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Latvian
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« Reply #199 on: December 22, 2018, 12:07:09 pm »

Samuil Feinberg (1890-1962)

Piano Sonata No. 5 in B minor / E minor, Op. 10 (1921)
    Evgeniya Polina, piano

Piano Sonata No. 12 in F-sharp major (1962)
        Sonatina
        Intermezzo
        Improvisation
    Zinaida Ignateva, piano

Preludes, Op. 8 (1922)
        Allegretto (in G major)
        Misterioso (in A minor)
        Tumultoso (in F-sharp minor)
        Con moto (in E-flat major)
    Viktor Bunin, piano

Piano Sonata No. 11 in C major, Op. 40 (1952)
    Vladimir Bunin, piano

    from LP: Melodiya S10-15223/24 (released 1981, never reissued on CD to the best of my knowledge)

A long-defunct collection of Feinberg's piano music with four different pianists.
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Bobyor
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« Reply #200 on: December 22, 2018, 09:36:04 pm »

Many thanks for these. Both Bunin and Ignat'eva were Feinberg's students, and I've heard them both play (the former is still playing a lot of Feinberg, into his 80s). I expect Polina was also one of his students. I have heard that M-A Hamelin recorded sonatas 1-6 last week, and there are rumours that there will be a series or festival dedicated to Feinberg, Medtner and Szymanowski in Helsinki perhaps next year.
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« Reply #201 on: December 22, 2018, 10:41:24 pm »

You're welcome, and thanks for the information on the pianists. I've long thought that these performances were particularly atmospheric, so knowing some of them were students of Feinberg certainly explains their affinity for the music.

This disc was my introduction to Feinberg's music when I found it in a used record shop back in the 1980s, and the 12th Sonata has become one of my favorite piano pieces.
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Bobyor
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« Reply #202 on: December 23, 2018, 08:11:49 am »

For me, the strongest of the sonatas are 1-4, 6-10, 12, especially 2, 6, 7, 8 & 12.
Bunin's other recordings are all top-notch too. He also knew Alexandrov who wrote a concerto and solo pieces for Bunin. I think Golubev wrote for him too.
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christopher
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« Reply #203 on: January 02, 2019, 12:39:50 am »

In the Russian/Soviet downloads folder:

Alexander Goedicke (1877-1957)
Symphony No. 3 in C minor, Op. 30 (1922)
      Adagio -- Allegro moderato
      Andante cantabile
      Allegro
   Moscow Radio Symphony Orchestra
   Boris Khaikin, conductor

from LP: Melodiya D-04786/87 (released 1958, never reissued on CD to the best of my knowledge)

A sprawling, conservative symphony in the grand Russian tradition, not overtly nationalistic, from the early years of the Soviet Union.

Thanks for this Maris.  Do you by any chance have the record cover image as well?
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Latvian
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« Reply #204 on: January 04, 2019, 12:37:25 pm »

Sorry, Christopher, I don't have the LP anymore and no scan or photo. As I recall, though, it was one of Melodiya's generic jackets, though.
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rkhenderson
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« Reply #205 on: January 04, 2019, 01:59:16 pm »

There is a photo of a record sleeve here:
https://www.popsike.com/ALEXANDER-GOEDICKE-Symphony-3-RARE-Melodiya-LP/380205749258.html
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christopher
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« Reply #206 on: January 06, 2019, 12:55:28 pm »


Thanks for this!
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christopher
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« Reply #207 on: December 10, 2019, 12:57:50 pm »

Hasanov, Gotfrid Alidin xva (1900-1965)

Also spelt Gasanov.

From the republic of Dagestan within Russia.

He wrote the first Dagestani opera "Khochbar" and I have finally managed to locate a copy and put in the Downloads section.  The quality sound is very low though, so if anyone has a converter system to improve the volume that would be much appreciated!

It is from the archives of the State-Radio company of Dagestan.

Hasanov has been mentioned here before, and his piano concerto has been posted up here (and on youtube) and been described as Rachmaninovian.


HISTORY and SYNOPSIS of the opera (via google translate of the opera's wikipedia page - https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Хочбар_(опера)):

Story and plot
Khochbar with his detachment raided all the way to Khunzakh, took the loot from the rich and distributed to all the poor. The Khunzakh khan understood that the war of the Hydatlins could not be defeated, he decided by decoy to decapitate their resistance - to destroy the leader of the Hydatlins. Mindful that they didn’t refuse an invitation in the mountains, he called Khochbar to his “wedding”. When he comes, the khan’s entourage binds him and the khan decides to put Khochbar to death — burning him at the stake. Before his death, Khochbar breaks out and takes two small children of the khan with him to the fire.

Staging the opera
The opera was staged in 1995 by the Dagestan State Philharmonic Society, the choir of the Dagestan State Pedagogical University, and the choir of the Makhachkala Music College. Later, with the opening in 1998. Dagestan State Opera and Ballet Theater, the opera was staged by the forces of this theater. From this premiere, the theater began to exist.


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christopher
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« Reply #208 on: December 10, 2019, 12:58:58 pm »

Hasanov, Gotfrid Alidin xva (1900-1965)  (continued...)

NOTES ON HYDATLINS AND NUKERS:  

Nukers
Hydatlins
The Hydatli Free Society was a political entity that existed on the territory of Avaria (present-day Dagestan).

Gidatl - a free voluntary (jamaat) society (an independent state formation, with a republican form of organization of public administration), consisting of 7 associations of rural communities:

Etymology
There is no consensus on the origin of the name "Hyde" (Hydatlins) in folk etymology. There are various versions [3]:

According to one version, the name comes from the Avar word "gyy", which means boiled grain (beans, corn, peas, wheat together).
Another version says that the amazing beauty of the nature of the Hydatlinsky valley supposedly gave occasion to neighbors to compare figuratively to compare with the Gyinda Valley in India.
According to the next version, the name "Guid" is considered to be going back to the Hindu word "Hyde", which in Hindi means freedom-loving, independent. It is believed that the freedom-loving nature and independent spirit of the Hydatlins caused this name.
According to another version, the name "Gyid" is an abbreviated Arabic word for "Gyayd." Which means leadership, leadership, leadership. A kind of leading position of the Hydatlins (or Gydatlins) among their neighbors was supposedly the reason for the appearance of such a name.
Geography
Gidatl is located on the territory of the current Shamil region. The main river is Gichinoor.

Administrative division
The free community of Gidatl consisted of eight villages: Ghent, Machad, Nakitl, Tidib, Tlyach, Urad, Khotoda and Khuchad.

Story
Hydatlins, according to historical, toponic and ethnographic data, in ancient times lived in 25 settlements, spread over a vast ethnic territory. In the X-XI centuries. n e. in Gidatl, a process of compact residence, the merger of several small but well-fortified settlements and the formation of villages took place. So, for example, from 4 small settlements - Rosakh, Solo, Churda, Ritli and Shulata, the village of Choloda was formed (now the village of Machada). Thus, in due time, modern hydatlinsky villages arose, except for Khuchad and Nakitl [3].

It is also known that people from Hydatl were originally founded with Urib (Shamilsky district), with. Urukh-sota (Charodinsky district), with. Kulab (Gunibsky district), with. Kedi (Tsumadinsky district), with. Gidatli (Tlyarotinsky district) and with. Chirkey (Buinaksk district).

Gidatlinskaya land gave Dagestan the legendary Khochbar.

Gidatl is the birthplace of two Imams (Gazi Magomed and Shamil). It is known that their paternal ancestors came from Hydatl [4].

The Hydatlins made a significant contribution to the defeat of the troops of Nadir Shah. In this regard, it should be noted that Ibrahim-Haji al Gidatli (great-grandfather on the paternal side of the first Imam of Dagestan, Gazi-Muhammad), using his great authority among the spiritual leaders of Dagestan, wrote 16 appeals to various accident societies. Thanks to this, all I6 Accident societies were mobilized into a single Avar militia and organizedly opposed the enemy, and this played a role in the victory over Nadir Shah. More than 300 people from Gidatl died the death of the brave and became martyrs in the struggle for freedom and independence of Dagestan under the leadership of our illustrious imams against tsarist Russia.

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christopher
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« Reply #209 on: December 10, 2019, 12:59:20 pm »

Hasanov, Gotfrid Alidin xva (1900-1965)  (continued...)

Population
The population of Hydatl was mono-ethnic and monoconfessional. It was inhabited by Avars, professing Sunni Islam. The local Avars spoke in the Hydatli dialect of the Avar language. The earliest written information about the number of Hydatlins dates back to the second half of the 19th century. According to statistics on the Caucasus in 1864, there were 3458 people in Gidatl. And according to the statistical survey of the Dagestan region for 1903 - 4565 people. According to the 1989 census, 4992 people lived in the villages of Hydatli, and more than 5 thousand people lived outside of Hydatl [3]. Today, the total number of Hydatlins is approaching 15 thousand people.
                                                                                                                                    
Religion
Before the adoption of Islam, the Hydatlins professed Orthodox Christianity, which was brought in from Georgia. Islam was adopted by the Hydatlins from the first Muslim in Gidatl, Sheikh Hadji Udurat from s. Choloda (now the village of Machada) in 1475-76

At present, the names of more than 80 large and well-known Arab scholars from Hydatl XVI - beginning XX centuries

In #Hidatl, there are 33 ziarats of the holy fathers of Islam - 13 vali and 20 sheikhs [5].

Hydatlins in art
Gidatl (Khotoda aul) was the birthplace of the brave abrek Khochbar - the protagonist of The Legend of Khochbar (published in the Collection of Information about the Caucasian Highlanders in 1870), based on which the first Dagestan national opera Khochbar was staged in 1937, Rasul Gamzatov wrote the poem "The Legend of Khochbar" (published in 1975), and Askhab Abakarov directed the film "The Legend of the Brave Khochbar" in 1984. The plot node of all these works is the independence of Hidatli.

NUKERS:
Nuker [1] (from the Mong. Nөkhөr; Kalm. Nөkr - friend, comrade, Bur. Nukher - friend, assistant) - combatant in the service of the feudalized nobility during the formation of feudalism in Mongolia. During the war, the nukers acted as warriors in the army of their overlord, in peacetime they became guards, “house people”, close associates. Initially, the nukers received full maintenance and equipment for their service, then part of the military booty and land grants with peasant settlers (peculiar benefits), which helped to turn them into ordinary vassals of large feudal lords. In the XIV-XX centuries. the term "nuker" began to be used among the peoples of the Front (particularly in the Caucasus) and Central Asia in the meaning of "servant", "military servant" [2].

G. Gubarev considers the social term of the Cossacks “military comrade” as the rudiment of the Horde Institute of Nukers, which indicates that the Cossacks — the nukers of the Crimean khans — having left them and settled in the Sich, only glorified the former name, which determines their position in military society.
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