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BBC Radio Times digitised archive (1923-2009)


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Author Topic: BBC Radio Times digitised archive (1923-2009)  (Read 183 times)
Albion
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Henry Hugo Pierson (1815-1873)


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« on: May 24, 2015, 10:07:07 am »

Not future broadcasts but a wonderful source of information about previous broadcasts over an 86 year period, including those transmitted on the Third Programme and Radio 3:

http://genome.ch.bbc.co.uk/

 Smiley
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A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

cilgwyn
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« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2015, 12:28:08 pm »

Thank you,Albion! Smiley A very useful resource tool,indeed! I have now been able to verify,once and for all, that Wonder Woman was indeed on BBC1 at teatime on Saturday! My parents being rather highbrow;I was able to watch this program while they were cooking the food. If they did pop in to the living room I could always pretend to be engrossed in the latest edition of Gramophone!
Now to find out whether BBC1 really did broadcast Laurel and Hardy,in the early evenings,on weekdays......around 7pm,I think?!!

Intellectual stuff,to follow,later!! Roll Eyes Grin
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guest54
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2015, 10:23:06 am »

It is - or could be - interesting, Albion, yes. But many of the concerts are listed with details of the performers, but without any information about what was played. The first random example I looked at was the Third Programme for November 9th 1963. An orchestral concert was broadcast in two parts, and later a twenty-five minute string quartet concert. I am almost certain that details of the works they performed would have been printed in the Radio Times of the day. In those days people did not turn on the wireless at random.

"This is a historical record of both the planned output and the BBC services of any given time. It should be viewed in this context and with the understanding that it reflects the attitudes and standards of its time - not those of today."

Timid what? Perhaps this means that in to-day's Britain (as in the nineteenth century) the glamour of the executant is all and the work itself a mere anonymous vehicle supplied by some composer or other whose name hardly matters.

Is this omission really Corporation policy (copyright fears perhaps) or is it the work of some ignorant office-boy who can touch nothing without polluting it?
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Albion
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Henry Hugo Pierson (1815-1873)


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« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2015, 10:41:59 pm »

The reference to the fact that RT copy "should be viewed in the [the] context [of it's time]" probably refers more to television shows such as The Black and White Minstrel Show, Mind Your Language, Are You Being Served? and Love Thy Neighbour. Very often radio programmes were not detailed comprehensively in the RT for reasons of space or the simple fact that the repertoire had not even been finalised at the time of publishing the magazine.

 Wink
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A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

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