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What all the fuss was about


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Author Topic: What all the fuss was about  (Read 392 times)
Neil McGowan
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« on: May 07, 2012, 08:51:44 am »

While searching for something else, I happened across this performance of LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPS - which allegedly recreates the (lost) choreography of the premiere.  It's worth a look, I feel?

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« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2012, 01:51:41 am »

Thank you! It actually comes in three parts, and I was able easily to download them all with "YouTube Downloader."

The first part includes a title sequence, in the course of which we are told - among a great deal else - that the orchestra is that of the National Theatre of Prague, conducted by Allan Lewis.

And what we wonder is the significance of turning the toes in - something done here by not only the old but also the young?
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ahinton
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« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2012, 07:43:49 am »

The success of the individual in politics is often dependent upon being the right offspring.

Much of the weather in Britain lately has suggested that this year has had a write-off spring.

As you were.

Sorry.

I wasn't there at the première of this masterwork (and despite being no great admirer of most of its composer's music I still accept the monumental status of this piece), but I've never yet figured out what the fuss was about - but then I wasn't at the rather earlier premières of Verklärte Nacht or its composer's D minor string quartet either...
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« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2012, 11:47:14 am »

It has now perhaps been forgotten that during his life-time Shtrafinsci had a very bad reputation. In the '-fifties of the last century I acquired a long-playing recording of one of his symphonies, which bore on its card-board cover this photo-graph. None of my aunts could bear to look upon it. They were repulsed and horrified by the mere sight of his face, and I hid it from their presence. They regarded him as a depraved and evil person. And no doubt they were right.


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ahinton
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« Reply #4 on: May 08, 2012, 01:17:02 pm »

It has now perhaps been forgotten that during his life-time Shtrafinsci had a very bad reputation. In the '-fifties of the last century I acquired a long-playing recording of one of his symphonies, which bore on its card-board cover this photo-graph. None of my aunts could bear to look upon it. They were repulsed and horrified by the mere sight of his face, and I hid it from their presence. They regarded him as a depraved and evil person. And no doubt they were right.

Misstor Seednay Grue, apart from the fact that your tipickly bizar speling of that pertickalar Russian composer's name really will not do, the nature of Stravinsky's reputation at any time and whether of not it may since have been forgotten or his appearance in one particular (admittedly far from flattering) unhyphenated photograph or any of your aunts' responses to it and how they accordingly regarded the composer are hardly germane to the subject matter under discussion, any more than was your attemtped "diversion" in the thread about Sorabji's Fifth Piano Symphony; whatever "all the fuss was about", it certainly wasn't about the composer's reputation or appearance or about your aunts' reaction to photographs and view of Stravinsky's personality.
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Baziron
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« Reply #5 on: May 08, 2012, 01:39:45 pm »

I don't think he was that much of an ogre - he did smile sometimes you know!

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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2012, 02:03:11 pm »

Stravinsky is another Russian composer whose personal signature has come down to us - in many consistently-spelt examples. 



There seems to be no doubt as to the spelling the composer himself endorsed Smiley
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Neil McGowan
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« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2012, 02:05:36 pm »

I don't think he was that much of an ogre - he did smile sometimes you know!

We're most charmed to see you here again, Baz Smiley  I wonder if you'd share your opinions with us on the "Bach's symoblic motifs" thread too? Smiley
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« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2012, 02:49:28 pm »

. . . whatever "all the fuss was about", it certainly wasn't about the composer's reputation or appearance or about your aunts' reaction to photographs and view of Stravinsky's personality.

Just to clarify that point, upon which I think you have misunderstood me: it was of course in the first instance not his appearance of which my aunts did not approve. (The photo-graph just reminded them of his existence.) When I say "his bad reputation" it was indeed his music which worried them. Quite simply they were upset by his noisy modernisms. By his "disruptions" if I may borrow that word! And also I suppose the immorality and primitive horror of the Rite. Such things used not to be spoken of among civilized people. And was all that not - at least in part - precisely what "all the fuss was about", and is not my contribution thus very much germane to the subject matter?
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ahinton
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« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2012, 04:12:05 pm »

. . . whatever "all the fuss was about", it certainly wasn't about the composer's reputation or appearance or about your aunts' reaction to photographs and view of Stravinsky's personality.

Just to clarify that point, upon which I think you have misunderstood me: it was of course in the first instance not his appearance of which my aunts did not approve. (The photo-graph just reminded them of his existence.) When I say "his bad reputation" it was indeed his music which worried them. Quite simply they were upset by his noisy modernisms. By his "disruptions" if I may borrow that word! And also I suppose the immorality and primitive horror of the Rite. Such things used not to be spoken of among civilized people. And was all that not - at least in part - precisely what "all the fuss was about", and is not my contribution thus very much germane to the subject matter?
Well, that was not the way that you put it first tome around, now, was it? In any case, my understanding of what the fuss was all about had more to do with the choreography than the music, which is a recognisable extension of that for l'Oiseau de Feu in any case. I cannot comment on what your aunts might or might not have chosen to speak about; however, at least pone composer has stated that listening to what might even have been the US première of Le Sacre du Printemps was what made him want to be a composer and, since he has now been composing for at least 83 years, you'll know of whom I write without my needing to mention his name.
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