The Art-Music Forum
October 21, 2018, 09:10:03 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Here you may discover hundreds of little-known composers, hear thousands of long-forgotten compositions, contribute your own rare (non-copyright) recordings, and discuss all the Arts in an erudite and decorous atmosphere full of freedom and delight. To participate, simply log in or register.
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Staff List Login Register  

Dodecaphonic works you admire and adore


Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Dodecaphonic works you admire and adore  (Read 2820 times)
Latvian
Level 5
*****

Times thanked: 42
Offline Offline

Posts: 562



View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2013, 07:15:32 pm »

I agree with the Lutoslawski, and would also add Schoenberg's Violin Concerto.
Report Spam   Logged
Jolly Roger
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 47
Offline Offline

Posts: 2006


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2013, 12:23:25 am »

Ok, if you like it, more power to you.
But this is precisely the type of music which has many people thoroughly disliking classical music.
When I am trying to lure someone to listen, this music is absolutely my last choice. And if I suggested
Xenaxis, they would send the men in white coats to pick me up. Music for and of the people, it is not..
Report Spam   Logged
dyn
Level 3
***

Times thanked: 1
Offline Offline

Posts: 135



View Profile
« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2013, 02:52:12 am »

Xenakis wrote some of the most thrilling and appealing music of the past century—for me anyway. On the other hand, the music of Wagner is dull and generally overhyped, and i have given up trying to like it.

I imagine your opinion is exactly the same as mine, just with the names reversed Cheesy


Have to admit of the composers i like i don't have the faintest idea which ones are dodecaphonic and which ones aren't, without looking at the liner notes that is. The methods a composer uses to construct their works are relevant only to them in my opinion—the results are what matter. Stravinsky's "serial" works are among my favourite music ever written, though. especially Threni, Movements, Requiem Canticles (which hopelessly dogged my steps in attempting to write my first choral work).

Schoenberg was no slouch either. i've never warmed in particular to the Boulezerie, but Petrassi's serial works have always struck me as quite underrated.
Report Spam   Logged
Jolly Roger
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 47
Offline Offline

Posts: 2006


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2013, 03:31:47 am »

Petrassi is a fine composer, as is Bruno Bettinelli - the music is abstract. I do not know or care what category the music is, I just like it.
Xenaxis gets my attention, that's for sure. the same way uppers do. If the mood is right..if I need screamed at, he is certainly on tap.
Schnittke and Pettersson are great if I want to wallow in angst, and I do recognize their genius.
So it all depends on our expectations and our mindset..
Despite Wagner's memories now polluted with charges of Anti-semitism, please read what other modern composers have said of Wagner's music (esp Tristan und Isolde). You will realize the hype is valid..he dramatically changed musical world. for the better.

Report Spam   Logged
tapiola
Level 5
*****

Times thanked: 18
Offline Offline

Posts: 614



View Profile
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2013, 05:57:08 am »

I love Kokkonen's Symphonies 1 & 2, Irving Fine's Symphony, Copland's Piano Fantasy, Hugh Wood's Symphony, Rautavaara's 3rd Symphony and......that's about it.  All but Wood were far from devoted serialists though. At Fine's death he was working on a neo-romantic Violin Concerto. I think they all felt too constrained and limited by the process.
Report Spam   Logged
oldfezzi
Level 2
**

Times thanked: 1
Offline Offline

Posts: 41


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2013, 06:10:56 pm »

My list:




Oldfezzi
Report Spam   Logged
Gauk
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 53
Offline Offline

Posts: 1107



View Profile
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2013, 08:11:22 pm »

When I am trying to lure someone to listen, this music is absolutely my last choice.

Actually, I remember well playing some Ligeti to a friend of mine who had no musical knowledge whatever and had no familiarity with any concert music. He was indignant - even angry - that he had never heard such music before, and was almost suggesting that these treasures had been hidden from him by some huge conspiracy.
Report Spam   Logged
Jolly Roger
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 47
Offline Offline

Posts: 2006


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2013, 02:18:29 am »

When I am trying to lure someone to listen, this music is absolutely my last choice.

Actually, I remember well playing some Ligeti to a friend of mine who had no musical knowledge whatever and had no familiarity with any concert music. He was indignant - even angry - that he had never heard such music before, and was almost suggesting that these treasures had been hidden from him by some huge conspiracy.

Atmospheres, I'll bet..Ligiti is quite imaginative,and often accessable.. he did write movie music..
I have a freind who is just the opposite...he savors melody and structure..and dosen't get angry when I play something unique.
Report Spam   Logged
Gauk
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 53
Offline Offline

Posts: 1107



View Profile
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2013, 10:52:52 pm »

Nope, it was the Requiem, and not the well-known bit, either.
Report Spam   Logged
Jolly Roger
Level 8
********

Times thanked: 47
Offline Offline

Posts: 2006


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2013, 11:26:29 pm »

I could not classify Ligiti as unsung...he has quite a wide following.
Another Italian who may be to your liking (in the general category as Petrassi), but not heralded and quite gifted is this man:
Dodecaphonic, atonal, serial..whatever..and perhaps meriting another thread is Bruno Bettinelli:
Report Spam   Logged
Neil McGowan
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 76
Offline Offline

Posts: 1310



View Profile
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2013, 07:01:26 am »

these treasures had been hidden from him by some huge conspiracy.

And they were!!   (See my note about the Straw Man Theory of bogus attacks on unfavoured composers  Grin )
Report Spam   Logged
Gauk
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 53
Offline Offline

Posts: 1107



View Profile
« Reply #26 on: March 25, 2013, 11:38:59 pm »

I could not classify Ligiti as unsung...he has quite a wide following.

I never said he was, nor Lutoslawski, nor Xenakis.
Report Spam   Logged
Karl.Miller
Level 1
*

Times thanked: 2
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: September 12, 2013, 02:15:36 am »

It is quite difficult to label many pieces as strict 12-tone. For example, much of the music of Xenakis is not 12 tone. A piece like the Boulez structures is quite 12 tone, but then he also tried to serialize other aspects of the composition.

For me, the list of works that I admire that have the dodecaphonic technique at whole or part of their construction would indeed be long.

Some examples:

Ginastera: Estudio Sinfonicos; Don Rodrigo; Second Piano Concerto, etc.
Rochberg: Second Symphony
Blackwood: Second Symphony; Piano Concerto
Searle: His Symphonies
Wellesz: His later symphonies
Gerhard: Many of his later works
Stravinsky: Movements; Huxley Variations
Rosenman: The Cobweb (film score)
Copland: Inscape and Connotations (probably my favorite Copland works)

There are many other works that "sound" twelve tone...like the Symphonies of Schnabel, many works by Berio, etc.

For me, there are many non-tonal works I value greatly...Speaking of Berio, Circle and Visage. I find Visage to be one of the masterpieces of music.

Karl

Report Spam   Logged
tapiola
Level 5
*****

Times thanked: 18
Offline Offline

Posts: 614



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: September 12, 2013, 03:06:22 am »

Kokkonen's 1st and 2nd Symphonies, Hugh Wood's Symphony, Copland's Piano Fantasy, Stravinsky's Agon. Just for starters.
I do not consider any of these strictly serial.
Report Spam   Logged
Neil McGowan
Level 7
*******

Times thanked: 76
Offline Offline

Posts: 1310



View Profile
« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2014, 06:58:04 am »

Stravinsky's hugely successful career took a nosedive in his latter years - when he succumbed to the pressure to write dodecaphonic twaddle.

But what is the real legacy of this stuff?  None, as far as I can see.

Twelve-tone composition is simply an intellectual diversion, rather like doing sudoku puzzles. And performing it is rather like giving a public display of sudokus which you have solved.

The actual continuum of twentieth-century composition - Janacek, Strauss, Lutoslawski, Ives, Britten, Tippett, Shostakovich, Prokofiev - has no space for the intellectual affectation of twelve-note composition.  Its influence is a complete 0.

Of course, it's placed on a pedestal by the self-appointed priesthood of 'modern' composers. Although in time, it's as far from "contemporary" music as Haydn was from Wagner.
Report Spam   Logged

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
traffic-masters
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy